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Ownership in Collaboration
Who is the author of a collabortive piece? Who gets credit?
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Why Collaboration Is Key

Why Collaboration Is Key | Ownership in Collaboration | Scoop.it
Ideas are worthless until they're out of your head and in front of others.
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Annotated Bibliography

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Intellectual Property Rights Debate

This rousing debate broke out during a discussion section at FEE's Freedom University i Seminar. June 4, 2009.
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Innovation Expert John Seely Brown on New Ways of Learning in a Rapidly-Changing World

John Seely Brown is a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California and the independent co-chairman of the Deloitte Center for the Edge. He has w...
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WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM by Steven Johnson

One of our most innovative, popular thinkers takes on-in exhilarating style-one of our key questions: Where do good ideas come from? With Where Good Ideas Co...
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CODE: Ch. 15 Key Quotes; Definition of Intellectual Entity

p. 292

 

An intellectual entity is an artefact :

- constructed under control of human mind(s);

- using other such constructs, and signals or information extracted from the physical world;

- that can be made perceptible to other human beings, or executed to control technical processes;

- and that can be separated from the carrier or signal that embodies it.

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Quote - Davidson

“Attention blindness is the fundamental structuring principle of the brain, and I believe that it presents us with a tremendous opportunity. My take is different from that of many neuroscientists: Where they perceive the shortcomings of the individual, I sense opportunity for collaboration… Because focus means selection… it leaves us with blind spots, and we need methods for working around them. Fortunately, given the interactive nature of most of our lives in the digital age, we have the tools to harness our different forms of attention and take advantage of them” (Davidson 3).

 

“We need a strategy for working in tandem – a method I call “collaboration by difference”… If we can trust our partner to focus in one direction, we can keep our attention in another, and together we can have more options than we ever imagined before” (Davidson 20).

 

“…collaboration by difference is the open-source and open-access principle upon which the Internet and the World Wide Web were originally created and by which they continued to be governed. It is based on the idea that productive collaboration requires not just a lot of participation by many different kinds of people but a form of collaboration that is as open, unstructured, and flexible as possible, in its design, principles, and motivation… this form of crowdsourced collaboration is based on the idea that if you allow people to contribute in as many different ways as they want, offering points of view as distinctive as possible, the whole outcome is more innovative, stronger, better, and more ambitious than if you start with a goal or mission and then structure each contribution as a deliberate step toward fulfillment of that goal” (Davidson 192).

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Quote - Gee

“Research from different disciplines work collaboratively on shared “themes” or “challenges” that require multiple methods and inventions of new shared methods and language” (Gee 63).

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Quote - Friedlander

Amy Friedlander (2009) explains, “collaboration is a social as well as an intellectual process and can be difficult for many reasons, some of them having to do with institutional and disciplinary cultures, language and terminology, mental models about the research process, trust, appropriate credit, and a sensible allocation of tasks” (6).

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OER Commons

OER Commons | Ownership in Collaboration | Scoop.it
Open Education Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials freely available online for everyone to use, whether you are an instructor, student, or self-learner.
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Central Scholars

Collaboration:
Colin Lankshear and Michele Knobel

Laura McGrath

Henry Jenkins

Cathy N. Davidson

James Paul Gee

Elisabeth R. Hayes

Howard Rheingold

John Hagel II

IJohn Seely Brown

 

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Concerning Intellectual Property: A Conversation Between Pat Aufderheide and Ellen Seiter (Part Two)

Concerning Intellectual Property: A Conversation Between Pat Aufderheide and Ellen Seiter (Part Two) | Ownership in Collaboration | Scoop.it
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CODE: Ch. 15; Direct Rights

p. 293

 

Examples of Direct Rights

R1 To create new intellectual entities, including by making use of preexisting ones.

R2 To make one’s creation public (original meaning of publishing).

R3 To be acknowledged as creator of all or part of an intellectual entity.

R4 To obtain economic or noneconomic reward for one’s creation, in proportion 8 to the interest others show for it.

R5 To access any intellectual entity that has been made public.

R6 To quote extract(s) 9 of an intellectual entity whatever its media, for the purpose of information, analysis, critique, teaching, research, or the creation of other intellectual entities.

R7 To redress mistakes, libellous statements, false information, or erroneous attributions.

R8 To give reference, link to, or create inventories of intellectual entities produced by others as soon as they have been made public.

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CODE: Ch. 15 Key Quotes; History

Chapter 15: Positive Intellectual Rights and Information Exchanges

 

A Historical Prologue p. 288-289

 

"It is only in the 1980s that it became apparent that two powerful and contradictory processes had been set into motion. The first process is the creation of a new realm of free creation and exchange of information, with extremely low transaction costs, and a huge multiplicity and diversity of contributors."

 

"However, in parallel, the second process saw huge industries being reshaped (pharmaceuticals, agro-food, centralized media) or born (proprietary packaged software). These industries have become highly dependent on the ability to gain property or control usage of information and knowledge entities."

 

"The system of intellectual property has developed into a huge machine, largely out of control, and ever more aggressive as it fails to stop the floodwater of information from breaking through the barriers it tries to erect."

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What is Open Source? - Computer Floss

This introductory edition of Computer Floss explains what open source software actually is, why it matters, and throws in a bit of history as well.
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Case Against Intellectual Property

Adam explains how the very concept of "intellectual property" is a fiction, a scam. And it flies in the face of real property rights. But that won't stop the...
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Howard Rheingold: Way-new collaboration

http://www.ted.com Howard Rheingold talks about the coming world of collaboration, participatory media and collective action -- and how Wikipedia is really a...
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Henry Jenkins on Collaborative Learning

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Quote - DeVoss, Eidman-Aadahl & Hicks

“Although ‘authorship and ownership’ make up only one of the ethical dimensions of online experiences, academic institutions often focus on these particular issues, which attach to the concept of academic honesty and its negative corollary: plagiarism” (DeVoss, Eidman-Aadahl, and Hicks 78)

 

“The focus on the single author and his or her solitary genius is, in academia, of the utmost importance… However, much digital writing is done… collaboratively, across time and space as well as across documents, and with what Lawrence Lessig has called ‘remixing’ as a key practice for invention and composing – this, writing by appropriation: taking bits, pieces, and ideas and compiling and remixing them in new and innovative ways” (DeVoss, Eidman-Aadahl, and Hicks 80).

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Quote - Burgess and Green

“…various forms of cultural, social, and economic values are collectively produced by users en mass, via their consumption, evaluation, and entrepreneurial activities. Consumer co-creation is fundamental to YouTube’s [and most new media platforms] value proposition as well as to its disruptive influence on established media business models… For YouTube [and most new media platforms], participatory culture is not a gimmick or a sideshow; it is absolutely core business” (Burgess and Green 5 – 6).

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Quote - Lankshear and Knobel

“…because web architecture now provides a sophisticated participatory medium that is widely used for purposes of sharing, it can support multiple modes of learning...” (Lankshear and Knobel 216)

 

“…there is no such thing as a private language. Rather, language – and hence mind, and hence ‘I’, and hence ‘knowledge’ – is public: in the ways that Gee (1992) speaks of ‘the social mind’. With Freire (1974/2007: 124), it shares the view that ‘it is the “we think” which establishes the “I think” and not the contrary. It is within and through shared practice that meanings – significance – ideas, categories, evidence, tools, tests, techniques, and all the other things that constitute knowledge come into being” (Lankshear and Knobel 218).

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Quote - McGrath

“Collaboration refers to partnerships of various sizes and durations that bring individuals together around teaching, research, or scholarly projects; intellectual problems; or questions of shared interest, with the objective of producing an end product, such as a new pedagogical approach, a digital archive, or some other deliverable. Such collaborations may involve formal methods as well as informal approaches, such as play or “tinkering”’ (McGrath 2)

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Representative Examples

Collaboration
www.wikipedia.org

www.oercommons.org

http://www.macfound.org/

http://hastac.org/

http://www.ted.com

 

Ownership
http://www.mla.org/

http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/ahrpa/opa/museum/1intell.htmhttp://plato.stanford.edu/entries/intellectual-property/

 

 

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Concerning Intellectual Property: A Conversation Between Ellen Seiter and Pat Aufderheide (Part One)

Concerning Intellectual Property: A Conversation Between Ellen Seiter and Pat Aufderheide (Part One) | Ownership in Collaboration | Scoop.it
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Soonr - Collaboration for Professionals

Soonr - Collaboration for Professionals | Ownership in Collaboration | Scoop.it
Collaborating with one another online is pretty much a prerequisite these days for small businesses, large enterprises and the humble college assignment group.
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