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Public Art & Establishments
Makers whose art is enhanced by innovative public displays
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"Breathing Trees" at the London Olympic Games

"Breathing Trees" at the London Olympic Games | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

A London public display that ran for weeks prior to the Olympic Games and up to the opening ceremonies set out to show citizens firsthand the benefits of trees in urban environments. Trees remove pollution and harmful carbon compounds from the air that could be damaging to human health, and their presence in urban atmospheres is estimated to save over 2 billion euros in healthcare expenses. Green environments are also proven to increase property values, lower obesity, and contribute to reduced criminal activity.

 

This knowledge was the base for the Russell Square exhibit "Breathing Trees" -- transforming the urban park into "the lungs of the city". Digital art company Creatmosphere partnered with the Camden Borough Council on the project, which implanted colored LED lights into the two largest trees in Russell Square. The visual effect combines with sound installations to create the inflating and defaulting movements of the lungs set against the sounds of a beating human heart.

 

“Breathing trees in not just a visual audio spectacle…it will reinforce our message that our natural environment must be protected,” said Councillor Phil Jones, who is Camden's cabinet member for sustainability.

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Art Exhibition Features Work Crowdsourced By Tweets | AdFlipoff

Art Exhibition Features Work Crowdsourced By Tweets | AdFlipoff | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Wrapping up today is the 'Tweet-A-Brief' exhibit sponsored by Handsome Frank Illustration Agency in London. The first exhibition for the Agency was certainly unique, as it invited the world of Twitter to submit proposals for the artists in the standard 160-characters-or-less format using the hashtag #hftab. "We received a huge response, a beguiling and intriguing mix of the weird and wonderful," stated Handsome Frank on its website.

 

Each of the 25 participating artists selected a Tweet from the over 200 entries and created a piece of original artwork based on its content. See thumbnails of featured pieces here: http://flippies.com/adflipoff/archives/30694.

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The story of a community - Face 2 Face

The story of a community - Face 2 Face | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

See anyone you know? The faces above are just three of thousands displayed as public artwork through the community project Face 2 Face, and while these images are from Glen Innes, New Zealand, analagous projects have been implemented or are underway on all six inhabited continents.

 

Launched in 2011, the international public art project Inside Out invites communities from all around the world to "use black and white photographic portraits to discover, reveal and share the untold stories and images of people around the world" (https://www.facebook.com/InsideOutProject). The photos are uploaded online, turned into posters, and mailed back to the project directors to be exhibited in their own communities. Anyone can participate, either individually or as part of a larger group, and the posters can be displayed in arenas ranging from one window pane to a full building front. Exhibitions are documented and can be viewed online via Inside Out's site, http://www.insideoutproject.net/.

 

Word of the project has been spread using social media, and upon learning of it, Tamati and Veeshayne Patuwai of Glen Innes, who run Mad Ave Studios, "a community cultural development organisation [that] . . . works on storytelling and communications projects" knew it was a movement to which they wanted to contribute.

 

On June 28, the Patuwais invited members of their community to participate in a spoken word and movement workshop. The individuals bonded while sharing both personal and communal experiences and learned about a variety of creative artistic outlets through they can continue to  express their stories, before having their photos taken for the Face 2 Face project. After a series of these workshops, the portraits will be displayed in Glen Innes at the end of July (http://www.madavestudios.co.nz/news/face2face/25794).

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Art Saves a City: 5-Story Elephant Prowls the Streets - Huffington Post (blog)

Art Saves a City: 5-Story Elephant Prowls the Streets - Huffington Post (blog) | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Nantes, France -- "a middling-sized city re-thought, re-imagined, re-built on the notion that public art is a smart investment that promotes itself as France's most bizarre city" -- has quickly assumed position as the "hot spot" of the European art scene this summer.

 

In the wake of industry shutdowns, the mayor of Nantes proposed an idea to reawaken the sleepy city: art. And not just the standard museum sort, but huge, edgy, newfangled public art displays, including but certainly not limited to: an 18th century stonefront house that appears to viewers to be half sunken into the bordering Loire River; a nearly intact WWII U-Boat and submarine station constructed by German troops with a series of gardens and a tropical canal installed atop; and a 5-story tall mechanical elephant.

 

The illusionary house, created by theater producer Jean-Luc Courcoult; offputting rooftop gardens, installed by landscape designer Gilles Clémont; and elephant, part of a series of works for the project by French company La Machine, are all part of an effort called "A Voyage to Nantes" that seeks to boost tourism to the region up from its already staggering 200,000 person and 42 million Euros marks of last summer . . . and to force those visitors to look contemporary art straight in the face.

 

Amazing photos of these exhibitions are viewable from the Huffington Post here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/frank-browning/nantes-elephant-art_b_1614553.html.

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Ghost estate turned into outdoor art exhibition - The Score

Ghost estate turned into outdoor art exhibition - The Score | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

The teamwork of a German artist and 57 Irish school children has transformed this abandoned Irish estate into a public art project. Considered an eyesore in an otherwise picturesque village, the ghost estate was a disgrace to the locals, who feared it would prevent the town's success in the annual Irish Tidy Towns Competition.

 

In the months leading up to the 2012 competition, Jochen Gersz decided to do something about it. Gersz, who was born in Berlin but has worked and made art in countries all around the world, took the issue to a particular group that he thought had the potential to turn the eyesore into something beautiful: children. He presented his idea in schools in Sneem, Ireland, and the local children painted 22 original images, which were then put on display in the windows of the abandoned estate project.

 

"There are 2,000 developments in receivership in Ireland. This project looks at ways we might make them easier to look at," explains Gersz. "Its joyful, make a sad thing into something people like to see and look at."

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Children's Book-Themed Party Decor

Children's Book-Themed Party Decor | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Check out these wildly creative party decorations based on timeless children's book favorites! Featured books include Charlotte's Web, Goodnight Moon, Curious George, and even the Hunger Games, and each has been brought to life to add flair to birthday bashes, baby showers, baptisms, and tea parties alike. The full list, complete with photos, is viewable at: http://www.tipjunkie.com/book-birthday/.

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Artworks with Coffee Cups | Fubiz™

Artworks with Coffee Cups | Fubiz™ | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Découverte de Red Hong, une artiste originaire de Malaysie.


Via MikAn
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Painted Pig Public Art Display Back In Cincinnati

Painted Pig Public Art Display Back In Cincinnati | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

The pigs are back. An organized effort to revive Ohio's pig public art display is in full effect. Known as "Porkopolis" because of its history as a "hog-butchering center," Cincinnati will soon host displays of oversized painted pigs, 12 years after artists first placed over 400 individual pigs across the city.

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Queens Students Speak Out On Community Issues Through Art In ... - Western Queens Gazette

Queens Students Speak Out On Community Issues Through Art In ... - Western Queens Gazette | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

The largest student art exhibition in the history of New York City and the first to span each borough, LeAp's Public Art Exhibition features work from 10 schools across the city. The art, activist in nature and mostly presented on lunch tables, deals with topics ranging from bullying to drug use.

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Preview: In Indianapolis, Moving Art Outdoors Attracts More Museum Visitors | Art Beat: PBS NewsHour

Preview: In Indianapolis, Moving Art Outdoors Attracts More Museum Visitors  | Art Beat: PBS NewsHour | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it
In a city that known more for its sports teams than for its art scene, the Indianapolis Museum of Art is making moves to redefine itself as a center for contemporary art with the addition of a new art park.
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Ginny Ruffner - Urban Garden

Ginny Ruffner - Urban Garden | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

On display on the corner of 7th Avenue and Union Street in downtown Seattle since July 2011, "Urban Garden" presents a cheerful, 27-foot tall steel flower pot with a yellow daisy, purple tulip, and bluebell flowers that open and close accordingly as a bright red watering can spills water onto them. This welcome display in the notably not-always-sunny Seattle is the work of artist Ginny Ruffner, who has helped pioneer the lampworked glass art scene in America and abroad. In addition to her stunning glass sculptures (check them out here: http://www.ginnyruffner.com/the-work/glass), many of which focus on floral and natural themes, Ruffner has branched into the world of metalworking, public installations, and pop-up books ("The Cycle of Imagination" is beautiful in concept and design). Much of this brilliant work remarkably came after Ruffner survived a car accident that left her in a coma for five weeks and in the hospital for nearly half a year. ShadowCatcher Entertainment's premier feature-length documentary about Ruffner's personal and creative triumphs, aptly titled: "Ginny Ruffner: A Not So Still Life" debuted in 2010 and was co-winner of the Golden Space Needle Award for Best Documentary at the 2010 Seattle International Film Festival. You can view the trailer here: http://vimeo.com/12832522, and upcoming screenings are featured on http://www.ginnyruffner.com.

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Berndnaut Smilde: Meet the man who can control the weather

Berndnaut Smilde: Meet the man who can control the weather | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

The print in this image, "Nimbus II 2012, cloud in room" by Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde, is the only proof that this cloud ever existed. Using a smoke machine, the moisture of the indoor space, and the effects of light, Smilde has been creating clouds inside like this since 2010. The clouds exist for just few short moments before dissipating, as this art of bringing the outdoors in can allow for only the briefest period of inversion.

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See Refrigerators Turned Into Public Art | Co.Create: Creativity ...

See Refrigerators Turned Into Public Art | Co.Create: Creativity ... | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Utility and power company ComEd has partnered with Chicago-based advertising agency Leo Burnett to make coolers, well . . . cool. As a follow-up to the 2010 "Fine Art Fridges" exhibition, 2012 has brought "MetamorFridges" -- a public art display that commissioned the work of local artists to create ten interactive installations from old refrigerators and their disassembled parts. The exhibition has a dual mission: to share reburbished, newfangled artwork with Chicago residents and visitors, as well as to promote ComEd's Fridge and Freezer Recycle Rewards Program.

 

The exhibition will be open through August 19, 2012. A slideshow featuring some of the works on display is viewable here: http://www.fastcocreate.com/1681188/see-refrigerators-turned-into-public-art#4.

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Art On Track: The World's Largest Mobile Gallery - Huffington Post

Art On Track: The World's Largest Mobile Gallery - Huffington Post | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Every year in Chicago, a six-car train is provided as a canvas for a local artist . . . for one night only. Celebrating its fifth year on Saturday, September 22, 2012, the "world's largest mobile art gallery" will feature a made-up train car looping around an elevated track.

 

An unparalleled opportunity for the chosen artist, certainly -- but not one without its unique challenges. As the mastermind behind the Art on Track project, Tristan Hummel, told The Huffington Post: "Around 250,000 people commute via train in Chicago so a large spectrum of people (with varying degrees of sensitivities and opinions) will be exposed to the work. Artwork has to be appropriate for anyone aged 6-60, so the challenge here is to show exciting work, engaging work, that won't piss anyone off." (Easier said than done!) Add to that the physical limitations imposed by the Chicago Transit Authority -- no drilling, no duct tape, no suction cups, etc. -- and a mere few hours' installation time right before takeoff (and only 45 minutes to uninstall, while the train is in motion, afterwards), and you have yourself a seemingly impossible feat.

 

But 12 different artist groups made the cut for this year's exhibition, and are currently working (both mentally and physically) to prepare for the September displays, and the official list of participants will be available on July 20 on the Art on Track website. Hummel has revealed that one of the cars will feature a miniature film festival playing four-minute films, just enough to be watched in the time it takes for a train to travel from one station to another. The trick is that it is going to be filmed as the train is moving: "The train car has two doors which open to let people onboard the art exhibition. If you enter through one you enter the film festival screening area which has been decked out to look like a movie theater. You can sit down and watch a four-minute film. If you enter through the other train door you enter an area that is partitioned off form the screening area. In this part of the train we are rotating in and out young directors who will be making four-minute films using our audience as actors. Four minutes is the exact amount of time it takes the train to travel between a station. Our audience suddenly finds themselves acting in a movie, which is filmed, cut, and put on reel between stations. When we reach the station they can leave the "acting area" of the train and enter the other side where they and other attendees get to watch the movie they just made. The process then repeats for the length of the show. So the film festival actually revolves around the natural rhythm of the train."

 

Additional information about the Art on Track project is available at its official site: http://www.builtontrack.com/.

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Stop, look at some art, go: NDMC gets creative at signals - Deccan Herald

Stop, look at some art, go: NDMC gets creative at signals - Deccan Herald | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Traffic intersections, roundabouts, park corners, gates to public buildings, walkways . . . these are just the beginning of avenues in which Indian artists are being invited to display their work through a new public art initiative by the New Delhi Municipal Council. The project is "aimed at promoting Indian art apart from giving a facelift to traffic junctions" and artist submissions are currently being submitted. In submissions, artists are asked to specify where they would like their work displayed, as the grand scheme is to pair artwork so that "it is in sync with the selected location and its surroundings" and is both "exciting and thought provoking," NDMC officials report.

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Pianos on Parade: "Your Keys to the City" in Homewood, Illinois

Pianos on Parade: "Your Keys to the City" in Homewood, Illinois | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

The sound of music will fill the streets of Homewood, Illinois this summer, thanks to the interactive public art display aptly titled "Your Keys to the City". Tens of pianos, decorated by local arists, have been placed outside shops and businesses for anyone passing by to stop and play at their leisure. The public pianos have recently been featured on ABC7 News and Patch.com and appear to have been received favorably by Homewood residents and summer visitors.

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A Sweater for a Plane « The Craft Project

A Sweater for a Plane « The Craft Project | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

LitCouture recently featured the yarn-bombing of visual artist Juliana Santacruz Herrera on its blog branch, English Majors Unite (http://bit.ly/N8JOaa). Artist, writer, and philanthropist Amber Church is part of an analogous project with Yarn Bomb Yukon (https://yarnbombyukon.wordpress.com/), setting out to break the world record for the largest transportation yarn bomb in history.

 

Currently hard at work for the project using the "largest ball of yarn" she's ever encountered, Church details the ambitious undertaking on her blog: "The Douglas DC-3 is an fixed-wing propeller-driven airliner, the speed and range of which revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s. Its lasting impact on the airline industry and WWII makes it one of the most significant transport aircraft ever made. Whitehorse’s DC-3 lives on a pedestal outside of the Whitehorse airport and acts as the world’s largest weather vane. And we’re going to cover it with yarn" (https://craftchick.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/a-sweater-for-a-plane/).

 

The project, put on in partnership with the Yukon Transportation Museum and the Yukon Arts Centre Public Art Gallery, aims to transform the aircraft into a public art display and boost appreciation for the skill and craft of knitting and crocheting. The pattern for the blankets used in the yarn bombing was created by Mary Ellen Reed of Northern Front Studios, and the 4 x 6 foot blankets will be completed by adult and child artists worldwide by mid-July. Then, the pattern will be assembled between July 23 and August 10, with the installation taking place on August 11 and 12, 2012 and remaining on display for airport visitors until the 27th. Upon completion, blankets will be donated to local charities and shelters.

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MIT Museum Announces New Exhibition of Holograms

MIT Museum Announces New Exhibition of Holograms | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

The MIT Museum will open a new exhibition on June 27, 2012 entitled "The Jeweled Net: Views of Contemporary Holography" that will offer visitors the rare opportunity to view a showcase of the some of the world's finest artistic and technical works in the up-and-coming field of holography. An expert panel of curators has selected the items for the exhibition, representing a wide range of artists from Germany, Italy, the UK, Canada, Australia, Japan, and the United States.

 

A product of mainly the past half-century, holography has created a niche community in the science world, focusing on transferring human vision into the three-dimensional sphere. Holograms are certainly still uncommon, and viewers often find themselves suprised and perplexed by how they are created. Seth Riskin, the MIT Museum's Manager of Emerging Technologies and Holography/Spatial Imaging Initiatives, explains that a hologram "represents how the human brain and light information interact to create the experience of three-dimensional space. Holography represents deeper technological access into light's capacity as an image and information carrier" (http://centralsquare.com/blog/?p=1749).

 

Further explanation on what exactly it is that we see when we look at a hologram is available from the MIT Museum's website: http://web.mit.edu/museum/collections/holography.html, as is a gallery of select works from the collection, which will be on display through September 2013: http://webmuseum.mit.edu/info.php?&v=1&s=7&type=exh&t=exhibitions.

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International piano exhibit comes to Salt Lake City - Deseret News

International piano exhibit comes to Salt Lake City - Deseret News | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Luke Jerram has placed more than 500 pianos in 22 cities across the globe, and his latest stop is Salt Lake City, Utah. As part of his worldwide "Play Me, I'm Yours" exhibit, Jerram will be leaving 10 pianos, painted by local artists, on sidewalks in downtown Salt Lake City for the public to play for two weeks. Once the exhibit is finished, the pianos will be donated to local charities.

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Cairo, revolution street art in photos. | Breakaway Backpacker

Cairo, revolution street art in photos. | Breakaway Backpacker | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

As Egypt holds its first competitive presidential elections, artists have taken to the streets to express their views--an act of defiance against a government that restricts the free speech of its citizens. Tahir Square, in downtown Cairo, has become the heart of the Egyptian street art movement. Most notable is the "Martyrs Wall," a tribute to those who have died in the name of freedom and revolutionary change.

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The Summer Guide to Finding Public Art All Over Los Angeles

The Summer Guide to Finding Public Art All Over Los Angeles | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Curbed's comprehensive look at outdoor art in Los Angeles cover 28 works of art, including controversial pieces like Forever Marilyn, a 26-foot-tall Marilyn Monroe structure that has been displayed in cities across America.

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Weekend in New York: Street Art - To the Trained Eye, Museum Pieces Lurk Everywhere - Travel

Weekend in New York: Street Art - To the Trained Eye, Museum Pieces Lurk Everywhere - Travel | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Art can be found anywhere, especially on the streets of Manhattan and Brooklyn, The New York Times reports. This brief guide to New York street art demolishes the artistic establishment's understanding of what constitutes art, as artists continually work to democraticize all artforms. New York, a hotspot for traveling artists, has become a prime destination for street artists who seek to leave their mark before returning home. Some of these radical artists can be followed on sites like Streetsy (http://www.streetsy.com/) and Wooster (http://www.woostercollective.com/#grid-view), which actively seek out new public displays in the five boroughs. 

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DISPATCHWORK: Iconic Art Installation

DISPATCHWORK: Iconic Art Installation | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

Jan Vormann is an internationally recognized artist who fills holes in the wall with legos....

 

What is it that you do? How do you define your work? 

 

I work on a variety of subjects, using very different materials. Over the course of the last 5 years, it has become clearer to me, what my focus rests on: I generally work on two fields; for inside gallery spaces I develop kinetic objects and outside, in the streets, I try to intervene in people's daily routines with installations in public space, which sometimes just happen to be kinetic mechanisms as well. Within both fields you might recognize my interest in the examination of "the ephemeral" or, in other words, dealing with decay over certain periods of time. 

For me, it is important to use recognizable objects, or objects of symbolic value, in order to permit an emotional access to the work. Whereas some artists develop works which are meant to be understood by "insiders" only, I am flattered if my works mean something to people who are both "insiders" or "outsiders" to the art world. I also believe that in arts, there shouldn´t be people left out on purpose. Of course, for some of my works you need a bit of background information, but for some you plainly don't, because they are easy to "enter.”


I think that, for example, my work revolving around soapbubbles or plastic toy construction pieces bears an "emotional access" to many spectators worldwide, because both are "global obects" with high value of recognition; without having facts for back-up – based solely on my experiences while travelling - I estimate that the vast majority of the world population has at least once in their childhood held these toys in their own hands and has played with them. Having said that, I believe that it is generally possible to find, in the western world especially, emotional connections to these "little plastic bricks.” Now, if you want, the project can be seen as more than just plainly repairing walls with toys. First, I think, it establishes a link between the gathering of basic architectural principles while playing as a kid, with the consequential use of this playful study later in life: the construction of walls in order to survive (essential for houses to live in, in order to keep vicious natural elements outside - I am not talking about walls as structures for separation between humans!) Secondly, the project shows the contrasting ideas of the perfect environment to raise kids in and the format we are then willing to live in ourselves as adults: Toys for kids are mostly very shiny and colorful - our cities, especially metropolises, are mostly dull and grey. There are people who try to change this discrepancy - e.g. streetartists - but they are mostly doing it on their own costs and with the risk of getting caught. Maybe, to change the discrepancy, we should do it the other way around, and sell grey toys to the people who enjoy living in grey cities, so they can raise their kids to get "the right idea" about what to expect later in life.

 

What inspired you? How did you get started? 


The world is full of inspiration. Everything has the potential to inspire somebody. My "problem" is that I get inspired very easily. What I mean is, that if I talk to a mathematician who enthusiastically speaks about his work, I can easily get carried away and forget, for example, that, the day before, an enthusiastic gardener inspired me to let myself get carried away by thoughts about his domain. Nonetheless, I don´t think that this is the worst flaw to have, if you want to call it a flaw at all. So, for my works, the inspiration lays somewhere hidden out there, just waiting to jump into appearance. 

In terms of what has inspired me in the field of arts, the historical inspiration, there have been many artists in the past, and there are many contemporary artists I enjoy. I have let myself be influenced a great deal by surrealist painters and poets of the absurde: Magritte, Vian, Ionesco... and constructivist sculptors like Gabo and Tatlin.  It is absurd when Eugene Ionesco writes about how a whole city physically transforms into rhinoceroses, or when the train tracks in Boris Vian's book "Autumn in Bejing" lead exactly through the one solemn house in the middle of nowhere - and all the little details in their stories, that seem to not bear any truth or connection and be purely fictional and irrational. Nonetheless, I think that the human mind is capable of reading in between these sometimes rationally confusing lines and find out what is really meant by the author. In a way, I think this silent, cryptic manner of writing is sometimes a more comprehensible approach for the understanding and perception of the (sometimes seemingly absurd) world we live in, as opposed to just plainly trying to formulate what one estimates to be "the truth" in simple, understandable words and commonly used factual terminology and then going out and screaming about it as loud as possible.

To get back to the Dispatchwork project: the inspiration for that project came when I strolled through the little city of Bocchignano in Italy. The foundation walls there are made from construction materials dating back to the times of the Roman empire. As I come from Bamberg, a little "medieval city" in Germany, where restoration of the buildings has a big importance, I am familiar with restoration practices. In Bocchignano, these walls of old substance were reconstructed in the course of time lead by the necessity of a stable house to live in, and by no means by the visual appearance and design. As construction materials have changed since, and also availability in terms of financial possibility, of course people couldn´t care less about the appearance - they wanted to ensure a secure shelter for their families. This given patchwork then, lead me to the assumption, that, as a kid, I did the same thing while building structures: When trying to build structures, and a certain stone of the matching color wasn´t available (or I couldn´t find it somewhere deep down in the box) I just had to help myself by using one of a different color - giving up visual unison but gaining structural integrity. So this is the reason, why for the project I am intentionally not trying to use stones of colors that match the walls, but trying to achieve exactly the opposite: to build patches where, in itself, no stone of a certain color, sits next to one of the same color - making it as colorful as possible. 

I am very fond of street-art/Graffity/Art in Urban Spaces. Having lived and worked in Berlin for the last years, I have constantly been around people, involved or exposed to "putting colorful stuff on walls" - But instead of becoming subject to persecution by law-enforcement, I wanted to create a "clean" project: One that wasn´t considered "vandalism" (in fact, Dispatchwork is a form of repair!) and further, to develop a project that even people who despise street-art/graffity culture might appreciate.

 

 

How has your process evolved over the years?  


When the project was first up on the Internet, it gave people from all over the world the possibility to see it. Some of them reacted in a very positive way and invited me to their locations. With the generous support of many private persons or institutions (find the complete list here: http://www.dispatchwork.info/links ;) I was then able to recreate the project in many cities. The concept since has been the same: although pretty much every city has a different architecture, the basic principles, of course, are the same: A brick, placed on top of another brick - with decay being a universal fact anyways. What happened further is that at some point people started sending in their own repairs. The first one was sent to me from Australia. I remember very well, because from Germany, it is literally on the other side of the planet. I was overwhelmed about the distance that the knowing about my project had traveled through the internet, and then kind of "jumped out of cyberspace" and was materialized by the hands of other people. This had never happened to me so far. I think, for example, a musician feels the same when he hears people singing a song that he once wrote. It´s truly amazing. I am so thankful for all the positive responses I have gotten so far!
 
 

Tell us about your favorite or most recent project. 


Of course I enjoy the positive effects of the Dispatchwork Project, which means traveling to different places, getting to know friendly people, playing/working with them in the streets... Still, my most favorite project is generally always the latest, newest project. So, at the moment, it is the SLEM4 - the soapbubble life extension machine 4. In 2007 I have started to design these SLEM devices which would maintain a standard (commercially available) Soapbubble. Every SLEM is considered a prototype in the search for the longest lifespan-extension of a medium-sized soapbubble. The longest so far achieved period is 4,5 hours, on 4th July 2009. Again, using a globally recognizable object: the soapbubble, my intention here lays in the examination of the ephemeral. Undoubtedly one of the most fragile objects (if not THE most fragile) in the world is tried to be kept intact. It is an absurd wish - I see a bit of a parallel with Terry Schiavo, a lady which was kept "alive" for the sake of the beauty of life itself somewhat beyond reason - she was clinically dead long before the machines for her life support were turned off (The story was in the news a couple of years ago.) Besides this, and more importantly from the point of view of a sculptor, I was motivated by the idea to include the soapfilm as a material itself inside the sculpture. Of course the material, following its properties, breaks quickly - then, the object/sculpture is itself "broken.” Probably, if a collector bought the machine while the object was containing a soapbubble, and the bubble bursted, it could be a case for insurance - although, it is very unlikely that any insurance would at all insure an object that included a soapbubble as for damage.

 

 

How do you get your best ideas? 


I recently read an article about creative processes - some scientists say, that in order to create new ideas, you need to be subject to a couple of circumstances: First, to be free, or open enough in your mind to reconnect existing data in a new way - without fear of "making mistakes" meaning to create nonsense or to lose productive time. I agree with this first point, as well as with the second: you need leisure-time in order for your mind to be able to settle down, and to let yourself be distracted from essential necessities / the daily routine for accomplishing the necessary.

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Lilliput - "an art treasure hunt" for High Line visitors

Lilliput - "an art treasure hunt" for High Line visitors | Public Art & Establishments | Scoop.it

"Lilliput" is the High Line's first group art exhibition, and will run through next April. Taking its name from the mythical island in Gulliver's Travels, "Lilliput" challenges the conception of public art as grand in scale and schematic, presenting miniature sculptures inserted in unexpected places along the paths of the High Line. The featured sculptures are the works of six artists from around the world: Berlin-based Austrian artist Oliver Laric; LA-based Italian artist Alessandro Pessoli; Japanese artist Tomoaki Suzuki; UK-based New Zealand artist Francis Upritchard; Brazilian artist Erika Verzutti; and New York-based artist Allyson Vieira.

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