OUR WEIRD WORLD
Follow
326 views | +0 today
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications
onto OUR WEIRD WORLD
Scoop.it!

The Six Things That Make Stories Go Viral Will Amaze, and Maybe Infuriate, You

The Six Things That Make Stories Go Viral Will Amaze, and Maybe Infuriate, You | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
In scientific research on what makes articles go viral, amusing stories were shared more frequently than less amusing ones.

Via Danielle M. Villegas
Leonardo Wild's insight:

Interesting for those who wish to attract attention to their social media network or topic of discussion.

more...
Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, January 23, 8:32 AM

This is a fascinating article from the New Yorker that was posted on Google+. It's interesting that it's not SEO keywords as dictated by an artificial logorithm that does it, but mostly through emotional means. Definitely an article worth reading, especially for all content writers, whether they write for blogs or other content. 

--techcommgeekmom

Agatha's curator insight, January 26, 3:02 AM

diffuser une histoire

viral

OUR WEIRD WORLD
Reality is stranger than fiction, and that applies to all areas of human endeavor.
Curated by Leonardo Wild
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications
Scoop.it!

The Six Things That Make Stories Go Viral Will Amaze, and Maybe Infuriate, You

The Six Things That Make Stories Go Viral Will Amaze, and Maybe Infuriate, You | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
In scientific research on what makes articles go viral, amusing stories were shared more frequently than less amusing ones.

Via Danielle M. Villegas
Leonardo Wild's insight:

Interesting for those who wish to attract attention to their social media network or topic of discussion.

more...
Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, January 23, 8:32 AM

This is a fascinating article from the New Yorker that was posted on Google+. It's interesting that it's not SEO keywords as dictated by an artificial logorithm that does it, but mostly through emotional means. Definitely an article worth reading, especially for all content writers, whether they write for blogs or other content. 

--techcommgeekmom

Agatha's curator insight, January 26, 3:02 AM

diffuser une histoire

viral

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

A Wikipedia for robots allowing them to share knowledge and experience worldwide

A Wikipedia for robots allowing them to share knowledge and experience worldwide | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

European scientists from six institutes and two universities have developed an online platform where robots can learn new skills from each other worldwide — a kind of “Wikipedia for robots.” The objective is to help develop robots better at helping elders with caring and household tasks. “The problem right now is that robots are often developed specifically for one task”, says René van de Molengraft, TU/e researcher and RoboEarth project leader.


“RoboEarth simply lets robots learn new tasks and situations from each other. All their knowledge and experience are shared worldwide on a central, online database.” In addition, some computing and “thinking” tasks can be carried out by the system’s “cloud engine,” he said, “so the robot doesn’t need to have as much computing or battery power on‑board.”


For example, a robot can image a hospital room and upload the resulting map to RoboEarth. Another robot, which doesn’t know the room, can use that map on RoboEarth to locate a glass of water immediately, without having to search for it endlessly. In the same way a task like opening a box of pills can be shared on RoboEarth, so other robots can also do it without having to be programmed for that specific type of box.

 

RoboEarth is based on four years of research by a team of scientists from six European research institutes (TU/e, Philips, ETH Zürich, TU München and the universities of Zaragoza and Stuttgart).


 

Robots learn from each other on 'Wiki for robots'


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Between 2005 and 2011, nearly half of all new drugs were FDA approved without demonstration of tangible benefits

Between 2005 and 2011, nearly half of all new drugs were FDA approved without demonstration of tangible benefits | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

Between 2005 and 2011, nearly half of all new drug formulations in the US were approved without companies having to demonstrate a tangible benefit, such as relieving disease symptoms, extending life, or improving someone’s ability to go about normal activities.

 

What patients really want is evidence that the drug they are taking will actually improve their condition. But the FDA, the American drug regulator, doesn’t routinely consider this for new molecular entities (NMEs) – drugs that have innovative chemical structures that have never been marketed before.

 

The findings come in a new paper by Nicholas Downing of Yale University and colleagues, part of a series on the drug approval process published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), that found there was wide variation in the quality of evidence considered by the FDA. They also found that nearly two out of five drugs approved by the FDA was brought to market after a single pivotal trial.

 

A second paper in the series documented the lack of data required by the FDA when it considers approvals for medical devices – the study found that only 14% of high-risk medical devices, such as pacemakers and other cardiovascular implants, were assessed in one randomised control trial.

 

Both studies strongly suggest that the FDA is approving products that may not have accurate risk-benefit profiles, which could place patients at risk.

 

Since the 1960s, the total number of drugs approved has been falling on average, according to data collated by The Conversation. This is happening at the same time as the cost of research and development is going up. In another study in the JAMA series, six FDA scientists looked at the reasons why approvals for drugs might be delayed or denied. According to the paper, between 2000 and 2012 a half of NMEs were approved when first submitted to the agency and nearly 75% were ultimately approved. Some of the reasons why new compounds failed to earn FDA approval included inadequate performance and problems with doses.

 

It’s a hugely important paper because information from the FDA on why drugs aren’t approved is limited, due to data sharing issues despite recommendations from its own transparency taskforce. 

As Marcia Angell, former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, has observed, “there is growing evidence that … [the FDA] has become the servant of the industry it regulates.”

 

Taken together, the articles support calls for the FDA to be more robust in the surveillance of marketed drugs and medical products. Simply stated, we need to know if the products we are using actually work. As the Downing study shows, the FDA’s pre-market review process isn’t clear on this and the public remain none the wiser,


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Carlos Garcia Pando's comment, January 23, 12:35 PM
Well done! Invest in useless drugs and leave those "rare" diseases or conditions unattended.
The Gp Tutor's curator insight, January 23, 4:11 PM

Will it get any easier for the consumer when customized medicines eventually become main stream?

Jose Mejia R's comment, January 24, 5:52 AM
there is growing evidence that … [the FDA] has become the servant of the industry it regulates.” So sad to confirm it.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty

Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
Thirty years ago, the states with the deepest poverty were all clustered in dixie. But the rest of the country has been playing catchup.

 

So how did poverty stop being a Southern specialty? You've had, deindustrialization in the Midwest and Northeast. And you've had fast growing Hispanic populations, which tend to be poorer, in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Colorado (as well as North Carolina and Georgia, which could explain their presence on the list above).  Meanwhile, the Southeast has made some economic progress by attracting foreign manufacturing, among other efforts.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 28, 10:09 AM

When Americans think of poverty, they often times think of the southern states. However, that was most accurate 30 years ago. As time progesses, other states, especially New York, have been catching up drastically. Poverty is not only a southern thing, but a factor in on the growing rates of low income households across the United States. Although the quality of life among the states of low income households may vary, the povery levels do not.

Etd11's curator insight, February 17, 12:08 AM

is there a widening income disparity in the US? What are the reasons for this disparity?

viknesh's curator insight, March 2, 6:42 AM

When Americans think of poverty, they often times think of the southern states. However, that was most accurate 30 years ago. As time progesses, other states, especially New York, have been catching up drastically. Poverty is not only a southern thing, but a factor in on the growing rates of low income households across the United States. Although the quality of life among the states of low income households may vary, the povery levels do not.

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Office Environments Of The Future
Scoop.it!

Generation Y Rebels Against Company Tech Rules

Generation Y Rebels Against Company Tech Rules | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
Study finds Generation Y breaking company policies on technology use in the workplace.

Via Color-Art
more...
Chris Farrance's curator insight, January 17, 1:14 AM

Wrong people or wrong policies for a 2020 Digital Business?

Chris Bantock's curator insight, January 17, 3:00 AM

One of the challenges of transforming a company into the Digital world  

Chris Bantock's comment, January 17, 3:02 AM
Definately the wrong policies.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Natural 3D Counterpart to Graphene Discovered

Natural 3D Counterpart to Graphene Discovered | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

The discovery of what is essentially a 3D version of graphene – the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon – promises exciting new things to come for the high-tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives. A collaboration of researchers at the U.S Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has discovered that sodium bismuthate can exist as a form of quantum matter called a three-dimensional topological Dirac semi-metal (3DTDS). This is the first experimental confirmation of 3D Dirac fermions in the interior or bulk of a material, a novel state that was only recently proposed by theorists.

 

“A 3DTDS is a natural three-dimensional counterpart to graphene with similar or even better electron mobility and velocity,” says Yulin Chen, a physicist from the University of Oxford who led this study working with Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) . “Because of its 3D Dirac fermions in the bulk, a 3DTDS also features intriguing non-saturating linear magnetoresistance that can be orders of magnitude higher than the materials now used in hard drives, and it opens the door to more efficient optical sensors.”

 

Chen is the corresponding author of a paper in Science reporting the discovery. The paper is titled “Discovery of a Three-dimensional Topological Dirac Semimetal, Na3Bi.”

 

Two of the most exciting new materials in the world of high technology today are graphene and topological insulators, crystalline materials that are electrically insulating in the bulk but conducting on the surface. Both feature 2D Dirac fermions (fermions that aren’t their own antiparticle), which give rise to extraordinary and highly coveted physical properties. Topological insulators also possess a unique electronic structure, in which bulk electrons behave like those in an insulator while surface electrons behave like those in graphene.

 

“The swift development of graphene and topological insulators has raised questions as to whether there are 3D counterparts and other materials with unusual topology in their electronic structure,” says Chen. “Our discovery answers both questions. In the sodium bismuthate we studied, the bulk conduction and valence bands touch only at discrete points and disperse linearly along all three momentum directions to form bulk 3D Dirac fermions. Furthermore, the topology of a 3DTSD electronic structure is also as unique as those of topological insulators.”

 

The discovery was made at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a DOE national user facility housed at Berkeley Lab, using beamline 10.0.1, which is optimized for electron structure studies. The collaborating research team first developed a special procedure to properly synthesize and transport the sodium bismuthate, a semi-metal compound identified as a strong 3DTDS candidate by co-authors Fang and Dai, theorists with the Chinese Academy of Sciences.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Dolphins Stay Awake for Two Weeks by Sleeping Only with Half of their Brain

Dolphins Stay Awake for Two Weeks by Sleeping Only with Half of their Brain | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

Unlike land mammals, dolphins sleep with only part of their brains at any time, past research has suggested. Half of their brains rest, while the other half remains "awake," and dolphins regularly switch which side is active. These findings suggest how dolphins can keep on the constant lookout for sharks, investigators added.


"After being awake for many hours or days, humans and other animals are forced to stop all activity and sleep," said researcher Brian Branstetter, a marine biologist at the National Marine Mammal Foundation in San Diego. "Dolphins do not have this restriction, and if they did, they would probably drown or become easy prey."


To see just how mindful dolphins are with just half a brain, researchers tested their ability to scan the environment. Dolphins use echolocation to map the world, a biological form of sonar where they emit clicks and listen for their echoes to probe murky, dark surroundings. Sleep Tight! Snoozing Animals Gallery.

 

The researchers set up a portable floating pen outfitted with eight modules, each consisting of an underwater sound projector and microphone. When a dolphin scanned any of these modules using echolocation clicks, they could respond with sounds mimicking echoes of those clicks from remote surfaces. Essentially, these modules could behave as "phantom targets" -- illusions that acoustically simulated physical objects.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Katherine Martinez's comment, January 27, 3:51 PM
This article is about how dolphins have half of their brain asleep and the other half active. Dolphins apparently to this to be alerted if any one of them was to prey on. If they did not have this, then they would be easily preyed on or they might even drown. Honestly I can't believe that dolphins can do this. This actually scares me, because animals can do stuff that we can not. It's just so weird to think of a human sleeping with half of the brain asleep. This truly shocked me, because this shows how incredible the brain is. Imagine the stuff we will figure out that animals can do in the future.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Writing Craft
Scoop.it!

Kurt Vonnegut on the Shapes of Stories and Good News vs. Bad News

Kurt Vonnegut on the Shapes of Stories and Good News vs. Bad News | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
"The truth is, we know so little about life, we don't really know what the good news is and what the bad news is." This season has been r (Creative writing lesson from Kurt Vonnegut http://t.co/qu5c4pqT...

Via Lorrie Porter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Best
Scoop.it!

A Comprehensive List of MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) Providers

A Comprehensive List of MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) Providers | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

The recent emergence of Massive Open Online Courses, commonly known as MOOCs, is revolutionizing the online education world and is having a profound impact on higher education. With the growing adoption of MOOCs, the number of MOOC providers has also increased many folds.  Below is a comprehensive and up-to-date list of MOOC providers; might be helpful to all interested.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Usein González's curator insight, January 14, 6:51 PM

Una de las nuevas metodologías de aprendizaje colaborativo está tomando fuerza a nivel mundial mi experiencia en estos cursos son muy didacticos, excelentes videos de apoyo y bien documentados.

asli telli's curator insight, January 15, 1:20 AM

list of lists for MOOC...

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Dolphins Have "Names," Respond When Called

Dolphins Have "Names," Respond When Called | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
Dolphins respond to recordings of their own whistles—suggesting they use names to communicate in the wild, a new study says.

 

We already knew that bottlenose dolphins can follow "recipes" in preparing mollusks, help other species in distress, and possibly do math. So it may come as no surprise that the marine mammals also call each other by whistles that act as names.


Past studies have shown that individual dolphins have a unique whistle, called a "signature whistle," that they often use in big group settings, like when several pods of dolphins meet at sea.

 

The idea that dolphins have a name in the form of a whistle has been around since the 1960s, and studies of captive dolphins have shown that the animals are responsive to the whistles of dolphins they know.

 

But a new study takes the theory a step further by asserting that a dolphin will respond when it hears the sound of its own signature whistle, repeating that whistle back in a way that seems to say, "Yup, I'm here—did you call my name?" explained Whitney Friedman, a dolphin-behavior expert at the University of California, San Diego.

 

It's "compelling evidence" that the dolphin indeed uses the sound as a name, according to the study, published July 22 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

The research was performed by a group of scientists on a boat off eastern Scotland who joined up with a group of wild dolphins. When one of the dolphins announced itself with its signature whistle—the equivalent of "Joey!" for instance—the researchers recorded that sound.

 

Later, the team played that same "Joey!" call back to the dolphins, and a significant portion of the time, the dolphin they called Joey responded with the same call—as if Joey was saying, "Yup, I'm here."

 

The dolphins responded a little when the scientists played recordings of whistles of familiar dolphins from the same population, but did not respond at all to unfamiliar dolphins from a different population. (Watch video: "Dolphin Talk Decoded.")


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

BBC: Timeline of the far future — What we can expect in a billion and more years...

BBC: Timeline of the far future — What we can expect in a billion and more years... | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
What do we expect will happen in one thousand years time? Or one million years? Or even one billion? As our amazing timeline shows, there may be trouble ahead.

 

The Earth's oceans will disappear in about one billion years due to increased temperatures from a maturing sun. However,  the Earth's problems may begin in half that time because of falling levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, according to a Penn State researcher.


"The sun, like all main sequence stars, is getting brighter with time and that affects the Earth's climate," says Dr. James F. Kasting, professor of meteorology and geosciences. "Eventually temperatures will become high enough so that the oceans evaporate." At 140 degrees Fahrenheit, water becomes a major constituent of the atmosphere. Much of this water migrates to the stratosphere where it is lost to the vacuum. Eventually, the oceans will evaporate into space.


"Astronomers always knew that the oceans would evaporate, but they typically thought it would occur only when the sun left the main sequence," Kasting told attendees today (Feb. 20) at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. "That will be in 5 billion years."


Stars leave the main sequence when they stop burning hydrogen. The sun, a yellow, G-2 star, will then become a red giant encompassing the orbit of Mercury. Mercury will disappear and Venus will lose its atmosphere and become a burnt out planet. The Earth will suffer the same fate, even though it is outside the red giant’s immediate reach. "However, the oceans may evaporate much earlier," says Kasting, a faculty member with the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences. "My calculations are somewhat pessimistic and present a worst case scenario that does not include the effects of clouds, but they say a billion years."


This model was developed with Ken Caldeira, now at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Things may go bad long before the Earth is a waterless desert. As the climate becomes warmer, the cycle of silicate rock weathering speeds up. This cycle removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sequesters it in the oceans as calcium carbonate.


"The silicate weathering cycle stabilizes the Earth’s climate for a time," says Kasting. "Eventually, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels will become so low that it will not be able to do so, but before then, there will not be sufficient carbon dioxide to sustain most plants."


Plants use carbon dioxide in photosynthesis to convert the sun's energy to sugars and other carbohydrates. Two main kinds of photosynthesis exist, C3 and C4. In a half billion years, the models predict that carbon dioxide will be at the compensation point for C3 plants which make up 95 percent of all plants. Below the compensation point, carbon dioxide is not concentrated enough for these plants to photosynthesize. C3 plants include trees and most crops.


C4 plants, which include corn, sugar cane and other tropical grasses, can still photosynthesize because they have an internal mechanism to concentrate carbon dioxide, but these plants cannot sustain the biosphere as we know it today.


"If carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere continue to increase over the next few centuries, they could remain high for a very long time," says Kasting. "Then, after fossil fuels run out, it would take a million years or so for levels to return to present."


But even if there is a pulse of high carbon dioxide in the near future, by a half billion years, levels will be too low for productive plant life. "Obviously, a billion, even a half billion years, are a long way off in the future," says Kasting. "However, these models can help us refine our understanding of the time that a planet remains in an orbit where life can exist."


Only a narrow spherical shell of space exists at a distance from a star that is neither too cold nor too warm for life. As a sun matures and brightens, that spherical shell moves outward. A planet must remain in the livable shell for long enough for life to evolve, even while that band moves outward. If planets lose their water supply, a mandatory requirement for life, earlier than previously thought, then that creates a shorter window for livable planets.


"If we calculated correctly, Earth has been habitable for 4.5 billion years and only has a half billion years left," says Kasting.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
odysseas spyroglou's curator insight, January 12, 11:44 PM

Is it any easier today with all the tools that we have at hand to predict future ?

Anne Fleischman's curator insight, January 13, 7:12 AM

Un exercice de prospective à très très très long terme. Dommage on ne sera plus là pour vérifier...

Jose Mejia R's curator insight, January 13, 10:13 AM

 I find it interesting that these assumptions , almost certainly based on scientific speculations indicate that if it is not consumed by a swollen sun after 5.4 billion years , the Earth's orbit would eventually collapse and plunge into the sun.

The doctrine of evolutionary creation states that in a solar system like ours , a myriad of primeval virgin spirits originates or emanates ' from the Central Sun, " discriminates evolutionarily in such generating means and then is ejected to different orbits at different periods time to adjust itself in vibrant radiant globes. Finally, in different cosmic periods each balloon will evolve into a more complex steps and become a planet as it is now known to and through a process of evolutionary creation, first regress to sink into the matterl in successive continuing times and then slowly evolve from matter as omnipotent and omniscient individual spiritual self-aware entities, thus returning to " the mansions of the Father ," whose visible symbol is the Sun, with respect to our planetary system. JMR


 

Me parece interesante que estas suposiciones, casi con toda seguridad basadas en especulaciones científicas, indican que si no es consumida por un Sol hinchado luego de 5,4 mil millones de años, la órbita de la Tierra finalmente colapsaría y sería zambullida en el sol.

 

 

 

La doctrina de la creación evolutiva afirma que en un sistema solar como el nuestro, una miríada de espíritus virginales primigenia proviene o es emanada ' en el Sol Central ', se discrimina evolutivamente en tales medios generatrices y luego es expulsada a órbitas diferentes en diferentes períodos de tiempo para ajustarse a sí misma en vibrante globos radiantes. Finalmente, en diferentes períodos cósmicos cada globo va a evolucionar a otro etapas más complejas y se convertirá en un planeta como es conocido ahora con el fin de y por medio de un proceso de creación evolutiva, primeramente involucionar al sumirse en la materia en sucesivas y continuas épocas y luego evolucionar lentamente desde la materia como omnipotentes y omniscientes entidades individuales espirituales, conscientes de sí mismas, volviendo así a " las mansiones del Padre", cuyo símbolo visible es nuestro Sol , en lo que respecta a nuestro sistema planetario . JMR .


 

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Docomo Demonstrates Glasses That Translate Foreign Languages Right In Front Of Your Eyes

Docomo Demonstrates Glasses That Translate Foreign Languages Right In Front Of Your Eyes | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
If Star Trek or Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy have the right of it, language will be a negligible barrier when we begin fraternizing with aliens.

 

Many of us are already familiar with the translation part. Google effortlessly translates words, phrases, and webpages. But lugging around your laptop while sightseeing in Tokyo isn’t exactly convenient.

 

The next most obvious solution would be something mobile, like a smartphone. But according to Docomo’s Shinji Kimura, “We’d already developed this augmented reality app for smartphones which translated text where you pointed your camera. But it felt really unnatural.”

 

Smart glasses make more sense for translation. They live outside your pocket and are positioned to take in the world like you do. Cameras, microphones, speakers, and augmented reality displays might work in concert to pick up spoken and written words, translate them, and someday transmit a response.

 

For now, of course, the technology is still being developed. Docomo’s translation app sends visual information recorded by the glasses’ camera to a server in the cloud. Character recognition software reads the text, translates it, and sends the translation back to the glasses’ viewfinder—overlaying it on the document, a menu, for example.

 

Docomo plans to refine the app and thinks it might be a hit with visitors to the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. Wearing a pair of smart glasses equipped with their translation app, tourists might more easily read menus and signs—and no doubt be mightily entertained by a few humorous mistranslations.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 7:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Social Media Bites!
Scoop.it!

Which Social Networks Should You Care About in 2014? - Digital Europe

Which Social Networks Should You Care About in 2014? - Digital Europe | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
It’s hard to believe that Facebook will be ten years old this February and yet social media still seems new to many of us.

Via David Blundell
more...
Ana Melo's curator insight, March 12, 2:41 AM

Great info graphic portrait of digital Europe.

sobrie01's curator insight, April 9, 11:35 AM

How can we better leverage these options in learning? How do we leverage these to show best practices, quick bites of information for a particular group or use it in the classroom for application learning through video and discussion of that video. Interesting. Anyone doing it?

YOBSN Money's curator insight, April 30, 10:14 AM

This should be very interesting great looking infographic agree?

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Facing the Intelligence Explosion: There is Plenty of Room Above

Facing the Intelligence Explosion: There is Plenty of Room Above | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

Why are AIs in movies so often of roughly human-level intelligence? One reason is that we almost always fail to see non-humans as non-human. We anthropomorphize. That’s why aliens and robots in fiction are basically just humans with big eyes or green skin or some special power. Another reason is that it’s hard for a writer to write characters that are smarter than the writer. How exactly would a superintelligent machine solve problem X?


The human capacity for efficient cross-domain optimization is not a natural plateau for intelligence. It’s a narrow, accidental, temporary marker created by evolution due to things like the slow rate of neuronal firing and how large a skull can fit through a primate’s birth canal. Einstein may seem vastly more intelligent than a village idiot, but this difference is dwarfed by the difference between the village idiot and a mouse.


As Vernor Vinge put it: The best answer to the question, “Will computers ever be as smart as humans?” is probably “Yes, but only briefly.”[1]  How could an AI surpass human abilities? Let us count the ways:


Speed. Our axons carry signals at seventy-five meters per second or slower. A machine can pass signals along about four million times more quickly.Serial depth. The human brain can’t rapidly perform any computation that requires more than one hundred sequential steps; thus, it relies on massively parallel computation.[2] More is possible when both parallel and deep serial computations can be performed.Computational resources. The brain’s size and neuron count are constrained by skull size, metabolism, and other factors. AIs could be built on the scale of buildings or cities or larger. When we can make circuits no smaller, we can just add more of them.Rationality. As we explored earlier, human brains do nothing like optimal belief formation or goal achievement. Machines can be built from the ground up using (computable approximations of) optimal Bayesian decision networks, and indeed this is already a leading paradigm in artificial agent design.Introspective access/editability. We humans have almost no introspective access to our cognitive algorithms, and cannot easily edit and improve them. Machines can already do this (read about EURISKO and metaheuristics). A limited hack like the method of loci greatly improves human memory; machines can do this kind of thing in spades.

 

REFERENCES:

1Vernor Vinge, “Signs of the Singularity,” IEEE Spectrum, June 2008, http://spectrum.ieee.org/biomedical/ethics/signs-of-the-singularity.

2J. A. Feldman and Dana H. Ballard, “Connectionist Models and Their Properties,” Cognitive Science 6 (3 1982): 205–254, doi: 10.1207/s15516709cog0603_1.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 3:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 1:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 10:35 AM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Health Trends and Advancements
Scoop.it!

Live 3D Organ Holograms Give an Unprecedented View to Surgeons (singularityweblog.com)

Live 3D Organ Holograms Give an Unprecedented View to Surgeons (singularityweblog.com) | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

An Israeli firm has developed 3D holographic imaging technology that allows doctors to see a patient’s anatomy ”floating” in mid-air during real time medical procedures. The company says successful trials of its system demonstrate that science fiction has become science fact.


Via Belinda Suvaal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 25, 7:06 AM

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 1:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 12:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Social
Scoop.it!

Devil Baby Will Haunt New Yorkers' Dreams [VIDEO]

Devil Baby Will Haunt New Yorkers' Dreams [VIDEO] | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
Watch a remote-controlled, posessed baby prank unsuspecting New Yorkers, leaving them terrified.

Via Christina Guenther
more...
Jon Koob's curator insight, January 14, 12:39 PM

Just watch. Please Please watch. So worth it. 

M. R. RAO's curator insight, January 16, 10:25 PM

Entertaining, though scary

Marta's curator insight, January 23, 4:17 AM

Un ejemplo de creatividad sin límites.

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Christophe CESETTI's curator insight, January 23, 2:37 PM

Pearltree "Géographie" http://pear.ly/cqIbP

Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 11:30 AM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Best
Scoop.it!

A Comprehensive List of MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) Providers

A Comprehensive List of MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) Providers | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

The recent emergence of Massive Open Online Courses, commonly known as MOOCs, is revolutionizing the online education world and is having a profound impact on higher education. With the growing adoption of MOOCs, the number of MOOC providers has also increased many folds.  Below is a comprehensive and up-to-date list of MOOC providers; might be helpful to all interested.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Usein González's curator insight, January 14, 6:51 PM

Una de las nuevas metodologías de aprendizaje colaborativo está tomando fuerza a nivel mundial mi experiencia en estos cursos son muy didacticos, excelentes videos de apoyo y bien documentados.

asli telli's curator insight, January 15, 1:20 AM

list of lists for MOOC...

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Best
Scoop.it!

A Comprehensive List of MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) Providers

A Comprehensive List of MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) Providers | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

The recent emergence of Massive Open Online Courses, commonly known as MOOCs, is revolutionizing the online education world and is having a profound impact on higher education. With the growing adoption of MOOCs, the number of MOOC providers has also increased many folds.  Below is a comprehensive and up-to-date list of MOOC providers; might be helpful to all interested.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Usein González's curator insight, January 14, 6:51 PM

Una de las nuevas metodologías de aprendizaje colaborativo está tomando fuerza a nivel mundial mi experiencia en estos cursos son muy didacticos, excelentes videos de apoyo y bien documentados.

asli telli's curator insight, January 15, 1:20 AM

list of lists for MOOC...

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Big maq attack

Big maq attack | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

"A 50-year-old export industry that provides millions of jobs has to reinvent itself quickly to stay competitive."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 7:32 AM

A maquiladora is a term that often used to describe a factory in Northern Mexico that enjoys special tax breaks for eport-driven production. Northern Mexico is an ideal location for this type of industry because 1) access to American markets is high and 2) labor costs are relatively low.  The Mexican Maquiladoras can no longer compete in a ‘race to the bottom’ for the lowest skill jobs, but they can produce higher-end goods and compete with China to supply more innovative consumer goods.  Labor costs in China are on the rise, making Mexico able to compete more effectively with them on the open market.  The total value of Mexican maquiladoras exports has grown by more than 50% in the last 5 years; more foreign corporations are investing money into Mexico.  Some of the more innovative and aggressive maquiladoras are attempting to become more involved in the research and development end of production; essentially they want to start competing with European and American companies on the lucrative high-end of the commodity chain instead of fighting for the scraps at the bottom. 


TagsMexicomanufacturing, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

John Slifko's curator insight, January 13, 1:02 PM

In addition to commerce what are the democratic and civil society institutions and social mvoements involved, or not involved, in this transiation now apparently underway?  

Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Quantum mechanics explains efficiency of photosynthesis

Quantum mechanics explains efficiency of photosynthesis | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it

Light-gathering macromolecules in plant cells transfer energy by taking advantage of molecular vibrations whose physical descriptions have no equivalents in classical physics, according to the first unambiguous theoretical evidence of quantum effects in photosynthesis published today in the journal Nature Communications. Scientists have observed previously the quantum character of light transport through the molecular machines at work in natural photosynthesis.

 

The majority of light-gathering macromolecules are composed of chromophores (responsible for the colour of molecules) attached to proteins, which carry out the first step of photosynthesis, capturing sunlight and transferring the associated energy highly efficiently. Previous experiments suggest that energy is transferred in a wave-like manner, exploiting quantum phenomena, but crucially, a non-classical explanation could not be conclusively proved as the phenomena identified could equally be described using classical physics.

 

Often, to observe or exploit quantum mechanical phenomena systems need to be cooled to very low temperatures. This however does not seem to be the case in some biological systems, which display quantum properties even at ambient temperatures.

 

Now, a team at UCL have attempted to identify features in these biological systems which can only be predicted by quantum physics, and for which no classical analogues exist.

 

"Energy transfer in light-harvesting macromolecules is assisted by specific vibrational motions of the chromophores," said Alexandra Olaya-Castro (UCL Physics & Astronomy), supervisor and co-author of the research. "We found that the properties of some of the chromophore vibrations that assist energy transfer during photosynthesis can never be described with classical laws, and moreover, this non-classical behaviour enhances the efficiency of the energy transfer."

 

Molecular vibrations are periodic motions of the atoms in a molecule, like the motion of a mass attached to a spring. When the energy of a collective vibration of two chromphores matches the energy difference between the electronic transitions of these chromophores a resonance occurs and efficient energy exchange between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom takes place.

 

Providing that the energy associated to the vibration is higher than the temperature scale, only a discrete unit or quantum of energy is exchanged. Consequently, as energy is transferred from one chromophore to the other, the collective vibration displays properties that have no classical counterpart.

 

The UCL team found the unambiguous signature of non-classicality is given by a negative joint probability of finding the chromophores with certain relative positions and momenta. In classical physics, probability distributions are always positive.

 

"The negative values in these probability distributions are a manifestation of a truly quantum feature, that is, the coherent exchange of a single quantum of energy," explained Edward O'Reilly (UCL Physics & Astronomy), first author of the study. "When this happens electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom are jointly and transiently in a superposition of quantum states, a feature that can never be predicted with classical physics."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonardo Wild from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | OUR WEIRD WORLD | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 6:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 5:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 3:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates.