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A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”


I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.


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Mary Rack's insight:

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching - 

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Our Physical World
Over, under, and around the earth and the skies
Curated by Mary Rack
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Volcanic Eruption

"WebCams de Mexico archives the best of webcam videos in Mexico."


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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 17, 3:53 PM

Impressionnant

Mr Inniss's curator insight, March 20, 9:28 AM

watch an eruption in action

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 12:43 PM

It almost reminds me of a blemish that needs to be tended to on the face of the earth and it just couldn't handle the pressure anymore. My fascination with the way the earth does things blows my mind. 

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Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | Our Physical World | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 10, 4:39 PM

This is a great set of images showing the human impact on the environment, with a special nod to our neighbors for the north.  These images have an artistic beauty and I hope every geographer maintains a sense of wonder at the details and beauty of the Earth. 


TagsCanada, images, art, remote sensing, land use, landscape

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 23, 1:02 AM
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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

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4 animations that show what's really going on with our climate

4 animations that show what's really going on with our climate | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

"Trying to understand what’s actually going on in the world’s climate seems like it might be truly impossible. For one thing, there are so many different factors at work. Everything from how light travels through the atmosphere to how the winds move the ocean around to how rain hits the ground has an effect on what actually happens on Earth both now and in the future. That also means there’s absolutely no use in looking at each piece individually … to understand what’s really going on, the climate jigsaw puzzle needs to be complete.

That, says climate scientist Gavin Schmidt, is where climate modeling comes in. The discipline synthesizes data from multiple sources, including satellites, weather stations, even from people camping in the Arctic and submitting measurements of the ice they see around them. Climate modeling, Schmidt says, gives us our best chance of understanding the bigger picture of the world around us. 'We take all of the things we can see are going on, put them together with our best estimates of how processes work, and then see if we can understand and explain the emergent properties of climate systems,' he says. These four silent animations show what he means."


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica, climate change.


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 6:59 PM

This makes me think of so many more things than just Geography and climate!

Nathalie Mercken's curator insight, February 11, 3:33 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 11:22 AM

All about climate change...

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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Gravitational Pull

Gravitational Pull | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

"Revolution and rotation are the terms we use to describe the motions of the earth and moon. Revolution is the movement of the earth in an orbit around the sun.  The Earth completes one revolution around the sun every 365 days. The moon revolves around the Earth about once every month." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:24 PM

Understanding the relationships between the Sun, Earth and moon are critical for for understanding the seasons, climate and other geographic factors.  This interactive simulates gravity unlike anything I've every seen on a computer screen. 


To exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.

Barbara Goebel's curator insight, December 23, 2014 10:41 AM

Writing prompt: Specify a set of objects to put in motion, have them observe the interactions of the objects, then write to describe. For younger students, supply an observation organizer note sheet. For older students, the descriptions can be as technical as their math understanding will allow. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 9:06 PM

It's pretty simple, the bigger the particle is, the bigger it's atmosphere is to allow more gravity. For example, Jupiter is the largest planet which is in favor to Earth. The reason why is because Jupiter uses it's large mass to protect Earth from oncoming meteors and comets. It uses it's large atmosphere to absorb comets and meteors onto Jupiter instead of allowing them to crash onto Earth. 

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Why Does Earth Have Deserts?


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Catherine Buckman's curator insight, December 16, 2014 2:22 PM

Interesting short video  explaining Hadley Cells and why the earth rain forests on Equator and deserts above and below. 

Gordon de Snoo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:05 PM

Good explaination

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 10:27 PM

Deserts are pretty much important for bringing warm air towards the equator which cools and causes rain to form rain forests. As the cool air hits the stratosphere, it warms up again because of it's hot temperature and it spreads throughout the stratosphere 30 degrees north and 30 degrees south in latitude from the equator. When it dries, it lowers back to earth forming a dry desert. I now notice that there are no deserts along the equator and there are rain forests pretty much along the equator. The Hadley Cells are pretty much like cycles allowing rain forests and deserts to occur.

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What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic?

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic? | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding is that the Arctic and Antarctic are similar. One’s in the north and the other is in the south; but other than that, they’re the same, right? No, this couldn’t be more wrong. These polar opposites are literally polar opposites.
For starters, the Arctic is a small, shallow ocean surrounded by land: Eurasia, Greenland, Canada and the United States. It’s only about 5 ½ million square miles, which is five times smaller than the Atlantic and 11 times smaller than the Pacific. Antarctica, on the other hand, is a continent surrounded by the entire Southern Ocean.

This may seem like no big deal, but it makes all the difference in the world. It takes a lot of energy to change water temperature compared to what it takes to change land temperature, which means Arctic seawater isn’t as cold as the continental ice sheet covering Antarctica. So, the Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) is about 10 feet thick, whereas the Antarctic ice sheet (compacted freshwater ice) is over a mile thick."

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 12, 2014 9:05 PM

It would be nice to keep both

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, November 17, 2014 2:51 PM

If we are

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The Science of Earthquakes

The Science of Earthquakes | Our Physical World | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.


Tags: disasters, geomorphology, physical, infographic.


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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 29, 2014 11:03 AM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 1:46 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Mr. Twining's curator insight, November 25, 2014 3:58 PM

Infographic for teaching about the science behind earthquakes.

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Earth From the ISS

"Watch along with Expedition 38 crew members Mike Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio as they look at various cities across the globe from the vantage point of the cupola on board the International Space Station."  

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, images, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.


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World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Our Physical World | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.

 

For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2014 1:16 PM

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.

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GE Teach

"Overview video for GE Teach http://geteach.com/maps."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2014 3:51 PM

GE Teach is a powerful mapping platform that harnesses the power of Google Earth into a user-friendly format.  I've you've ever wanted multiple maps on the screen to compare and contrast, this is great tool.  Designed by an APHG teacher, this is a great way to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom.  With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this becomes an interactive globe.  Click here for the video tutorial.  


Tags: googlemapping, virtual tours, geospatialAPHG, edtech.

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How to Follow the Iceland and Papua New Guinea Volcano Eruptions

How to Follow the Iceland and Papua New Guinea Volcano Eruptions | Our Physical World | Scoop.it
Webcams, Twitter, and data visualizations show you what's going on with Bárðarbunga and Mount Tavurvur.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 10:50 AM

Air travel was almost all in code red when Iceland’s volcano Bárðarbunga and Papa New Guinea’s volcano Tavurvur erupted at the same time one day. All of Europe was in code red and also the Middle East, East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Australia, Russia, parts in Africa, and even in parts of South America. All other places such as the United States, United Kingdom and Canada were all in code orange. I’m not sure if this happened by coincidence since Papa New Guinea’s volcano is very active or that it is somehow connected, But I was looking at the tectonic plates and it doesn’t seem like they are connected, but there are plate lines located exactly where the volcanos are. I am guessing this happened dues to both of those plates moving at the same time, creating a simultaneous eruption.

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What Happens When a Hurricane Meets a Volcano?

What Happens When a Hurricane Meets a Volcano? | Our Physical World | Scoop.it
When Iselle crosses the Big Island of Hawaii, it will offer a rare glimpse at a clash of the titans

 

Tags: disasters, Oceania, physical, weather and climate.


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Cassie Brannan's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:55 AM

When Hurricane Iselle crosses Hawaii, people will wonder what will happen to the Kilauea Volcano. The gases and particles that pour out of the volcano could make the hurricane severe and it could put people in great danger. Change in pressure from a large storm can generate earthquakes. Most of the volcano's actions take place underground and it would make the Earthquake less threatening.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:35 AM
The Kilauea volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park erupts sporadically, oozing lava and sending up white plumes of volcanic gases. So, the people of Hawaii are used to little hit from nature every now and then, but they are foreign to hurricanes in Hawaii. So, when Hurricane Iselle passes through, scientists are not sure how it will affect the volcano or if there will be any effect. Even though there has been a rarity of hurricanes in Hawaii, scientists do not expect it will have much of an effect on the volcano because previous storms with a lot of rainfall have had no effect on lava eruption in the past. Studies have shown that particles from volcanic emissions have caused water in storm clouds to divide. Therefore, scientists are predicting that the gases and particles pouring out of the volcano could make the hurricane more intense. Scientists are very interested to see what could happen when these two forces of nature clash with one another. 
Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 9:33 PM

While reading this article I felt as if I had no idea what to think since a volcano can affect a hurricane so much of vice versa, who would have thought that because a volcano cause the hurricane to worsen while a hurricane can cause a volcano to erupt with lava and volcanic gasses to escape. 

 The people in Hawaii must have to prepare for the worst because they really do not know what will happen because hurricanes rarely hit this specific area.Recently there was a 4.5 magnitude hurricane as stated in the article that people are assuming was cause by the hurricane. It is crazy to think that a hurricane can do so much damage to one place in such a short amount of time. it is also scary to think that just a tiny shift in pressure can cause the such a dramatic change in someone life, affecting their homes, lives and living conditions.

Hopefully this article is correct in saying "When it strikes its going to be ferocious, but as it passes over it’s going to be very disrupted,” said by Businger.

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Net Fix: 8 burning questions about Net neutrality - CNET

Net Fix: 8 burning questions about Net neutrality - CNET | Our Physical World | Scoop.it
With the FCC set to vote this week on new rules governing the Internet, CNET breaks down everything you need to know about complicated, but critical, issue.
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(8) Sometimes our intuition fails us, or our data is... - Birgit Pauli-Haack

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Have Humans Really Created a New Geologic Age?

Have Humans Really Created a New Geologic Age? | Our Physical World | Scoop.it
We are living in the Anthropocene. But no one can agree when it started or how human activity will be preserved

 

Tags: ESRI, anthropocene, environment depend, sustainability. 


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Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, January 6, 3:27 AM

Ako vzniká antroposféra...

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Mapping World Religions


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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, March 17, 1:30 AM

This shows the major world religions and their diffusion and current impacts and geography across the world, contrasting the far reaching religions of Christianity and Islam to more isolated religions like Hinduism, which still has many followers, but just in one specific area.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

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Gravitational Pull

Gravitational Pull | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

"Revolution and rotation are the terms we use to describe the motions of the earth and moon. Revolution is the movement of the earth in an orbit around the sun.  The Earth completes one revolution around the sun every 365 days. The moon revolves around the Earth about once every month." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:24 PM

Understanding the relationships between the Sun, Earth and moon are critical for for understanding the seasons, climate and other geographic factors.  This interactive simulates gravity unlike anything I've every seen on a computer screen. 


To exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.

Barbara Goebel's curator insight, December 23, 2014 10:41 AM

Writing prompt: Specify a set of objects to put in motion, have them observe the interactions of the objects, then write to describe. For younger students, supply an observation organizer note sheet. For older students, the descriptions can be as technical as their math understanding will allow. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 9:06 PM

It's pretty simple, the bigger the particle is, the bigger it's atmosphere is to allow more gravity. For example, Jupiter is the largest planet which is in favor to Earth. The reason why is because Jupiter uses it's large mass to protect Earth from oncoming meteors and comets. It uses it's large atmosphere to absorb comets and meteors onto Jupiter instead of allowing them to crash onto Earth. 

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Arizona canyon photo sells for record $6.5 million

Arizona canyon photo sells for record $6.5 million | Our Physical World | Scoop.it
PHOENIX — The world's most expensive photo depicts Arizona's Antelope Canyon, near Page on the Navajo Reservation. Landscape Photographer Peter Lik sold his print, titled "Phantom," for $6.5 million to a
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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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NORWAY - A Time-Lapse Adventure

www.rustadmedia.com Please watch in HD with good speakers for the optimal experience. You can watch it in 4K here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Scxs7L0vhZ4 This…

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Neighborfood - Code Michigan 2014 - YouTube

Our team took on the Farm to Table challenge at Code Michigan 2014. The outcome is Neighborfood.
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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Helen Rowling's curator insight, September 28, 2014 6:30 PM

Use updates to filter through and be collated in your most frequented tools.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

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Earth's Cosmic Context

"Superclusters – regions of space that are densely packed with galaxies – are the biggest structures in the Universe. But scientists have struggled to define exactly where one supercluster ends and another begins. Now, a team based in Hawaii has come up with a new technique that maps the Universe according to the flow of galaxies across space. Redrawing the boundaries of the cosmic map, they redefine our home supercluster and name it Laniakea, which means ‘immeasurable heaven’ in Hawaiian.  Read the research paper here."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2014 2:30 PM

Spatial thinking and geographic exploration is constantly seeking to understand place in context to other places.  More often than not, that is done without every venturing beyond this planet, but in many respects, space is the greatest of contexts on the grandest of scales for us to understand ourselves.  I first saw this video embedded in an NPR article and it filled me with wonder to think about the immensities of space and that the Earth is such a small little corner of the universe. 


Tags: space, scale, perspective

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Worst Hurricane

Worst Hurricane | Our Physical World | Scoop.it

"What's the worst Hurricane anyone in your town remembers?""


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 24, 2014 7:59 PM

Andrew  was bad, Katrina was most memorable

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:24 AM

The worst Hurricane that I remember is Hurricane "Katrina" in 2005. I was living in Puerto Rico but I remember seen the devastating news. The largest number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, which was flooded because its levee system failed. Also "Katrina" was the hurricane that has caused more economic damage as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States. It was a very sad event. I hope that does not happen again.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:51 PM

My father is actually good friends with a guy who he went to school with that specifically help clean up after natural disasters such as hurricanes. I got to talk to him for a little bit about hurricane Katrina, since that was his most recent natural disaster that he helped with at the time. He said it was probably one of the, if not the worst of the natural disaster to help clean and rebuild. He spent the most time with that natural disaster than any others he said. From de-flooding homes, to destroying homes, to rebuilding homes was one of the most strenuous things he has ever had to do in his career.