Our community and us, how do we protect it?
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Indigenous Protected Areas

Indigenous Protected Areas | Our community and us, how do we protect it? | Scoop.it
Besney Zhong's insight:

An Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) is an area of Indigenous-owned land or sea where there is an agreement between the traditional owners and the Australian Government. The agreement aims to promote biodiversity and cultural resource conservation.  These Indigenous Protected Areas are maintained by Indigenous Aboriginal communities, allowing them to protect their cultural values and land for future generations.

 

Activity: Students are given time in the computer labs/library to explore the website further and discover where there are IPAs around Australia. Print out a big map of Australia and as a class, get each student to pin/colour/mark where there are IPAs (http://www.environment.gov.au/indigenous/ipa/map.html). After that, each student can choose one of the areas to research on (http://www.environment.gov.au/indigenous/ipa/declared/index.html). Students should include:

-          A map marking where exactly the area is located in Australia

-          Who are the traditional owners of that area?

-          Who looks after that piece of land?

-          How do they protect their land?

-          What is significance of that particular area to the Indigenous People?

-          How has IPA helped?

-          What are some interesting facts about the area?

 

Excursion Idea: If possible, it would be a great experience for students to visit an Indigenous Protected Area, a great part of the website (http://www.environment.gov.au/indigenous/ipa/visiting.html) explains what people should be aware of when they are visiting an IPA. Respecting people’s privacy, respecting restrictions,  talking to Indigenous people, taking photographs and filming, and taking home a memento. These are all very important rules and guidelines that need to be followed in order to be respectful to the land. Students should have a read of these guidelines and understand why these guidelines are set.

 

This activity and resource will be useful for classrooms in Stage 2 HSIE.

Outcome: ENS2.6 Describes people’s interactions with environments and identifies responsible ways of interacting with environments

Dot Point: Local and other Australian communities

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

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Community gardens - City of Sydney

Community gardens - City of Sydney | Our community and us, how do we protect it? | Scoop.it
Your neighbourhood spirit will bloom if you set up a community garden.
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Local Community Gardens

 

This is a City of Sydney Council website which focuses on a particular community activity which has been implemented in the area. It explores what a community garden is, where these gardens can be found and how you can participate in it. This is a good website which demonstrates how local communities interact with their local area and ways they are being responsible when dealing with their environment. It is especially helpful as it lists local communities which have community gardens and other community gardens that are further out.

 

Activity for students: (After a thorough look through the website) Students brainstorm the positives that will come of having a community garden and potential negatives and how to overcome them. As a class/stage/school community, the school can set up their own community garden within their school. Students will need to brainstorm what materials they will need and work out the costs associated with creating their own community garden. Students can write out all their research and plans in report-format (similar to a business plan/proposal). This can be done as a class or teachers can have students perform group work, and collate everyone’s information and ideas to create one proposal which everyone is happy with.

 

Some important points to consider in the proposal:

-          Are there any rules that people need to follow whilst in the garden?

-          How will the garden be maintained – will there be a set roster?

-          Can people from other communities take part in your community garden?

-          Who does the community contact if any problems arise?

-          Is the community garden inclusive of everyone in the community? What if  someone is in a wheelchair, is the garden wheelchair-accessible?

-          How will the garden be set out? Will there be separate garden beds for fruits and vegetables?

-          How safe is the garden? Are there any potential hazards?

-          How will you promote your garden and invite people to visit and take part?

 

Assessment: Students will be assessed on their planning skills, this can be through observation during classroom discussions and the report/proposal they produce.

 

This activity and resource will be useful for classrooms in Stage 2 HSIE.

Outcome: ENS2.6 Describes people’s interactions with environments and identifies responsible ways of interacting with environments

Dot Point: Local and other Australian communities

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

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UNESCO World Heritage Centre - World Heritage List

UNESCO World Heritage Centre - World Heritage List | Our community and us, how do we protect it? | Scoop.it
UNESCO World Heritage Centre
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A Global Perspective

 

About the site: The UNESCO website has a list of the World Heritage List of all the countries around the world that has a World Heritage Site. This list is sorted by country which allows the viewer to see all the World Heritage Sites in particular countries. It also has an interactive map which has a map of the world and all the locations of the Heritage Sites are marked on it.

 

Activity: Students can use this website to explore the list of World Heritage Sites, there is a hyperlink on each Heritage Site listed, which includes lots of information and pictures students can view. After defining what a World Heritage Site is, and how places are considered to be a World Heritage site, teachers can then form discussion groups as there could be students which have been overseas to other countries and may have visited some of the sites and/or heard of some of the places before. Groups should be organised so that there is at least 1 student in each group which has seen or heard of a World Heritage Site. Students then share their own experiences and stories and brainstorm ways in which local communities can help protect and look after the site.

 

Excursion idea: Opera House in Sydney, Circular Quay. One of the World Heritage Sites in Australia, New South Wales.  

 

Assessment idea: Students can make a poster about a World Heritage Site and have them include pictures, facts and figures, interesting facts, location/maps, tourism and how the site is maintained by both local communities and organisations. Every student will choose and research a different World Heritage Site of their choice. Students will then share their poster and findings and present it to the class.

 

This activity and resource will be useful for classrooms in Stage 2 HSIE.

Outcome: ENS2.6 Describes people’s interactions with environments and identifies responsible ways of interacting with environments

Dot Point: Local and other Australian communities

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

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World Heritage

World Heritage | Our community and us, how do we protect it? | Scoop.it
The Great Barrier Reef has been at the centre of a big fight recently. The argument revolves around whether some development work there might lead to damage of the natural World Heritage site. Tash found out what being a 'World Heritage Listed' site means and where both sides stand.
Besney Zhong's insight:

Other Australian Communities & Environments

 

The Great Barrier Reef is on the World Heritage List. However, the government is risking harming the Great Barrier Reef by dumping sand, silt and clay in areas very close to the Great Barrier Reef and people believe that this will harm the Great Barrier Reef.

 

Use it in the classroom: Before viewing the video as a class, point out to students to keep an ear out for key words such as “dredging” “world heritage list/site” “UNESCO” “resources” “coal port” “drift” “tourism” and “economic value”. If needed, show the video in class twice. Get students to complete the table on KWL (linked below) whilst watching the video.

 

After the video, discuss what the government is doing and why do they think they have made this decision. What advantages does dredging have in this situation? What do you think of dredging in the Great Barrier Reef? Do you think they should be doing this? Do you agree or disagree with the Government’s decision? Why? Do you think this is a responsible way of interacting with the environment?

Collate all the student’s responses on the “What I want to know” column and put it up on the IWB/whiteboard/blackboard so all students can see. Divide students into groups of 4 or 5 and assign one or two “What I want to learn” questions to each group and give them time to research and find answers to them. Students then come back together and present what they have discovered. After answering all questions students have and discussing both views to the issues, students are to write a discussion on the topic. Teacher can also have the students prepare and hold a debate.

 

KWL Table:

http://www.eduplace.com/graphicorganizer/pdf/kwl.pdf

 

This activity and resource will be useful for classrooms in Stage 2 HSIE.

Outcome: ENS2.6 Describes people’s interactions with environments and identifies responsible ways of interacting with environments

Dot Point: Local and other Australian communities

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

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Indigenous Protected Areas -- Environment - YouTube

Indigenous communities manage Indigenous Protected Areas to protect their significant natural values for future generations. Australia Indigenous Protected A...
Besney Zhong's insight:

Aboriginal Perspective

 

This video explores the Indigenous community in Paruku, Western Australia. It is an Indigenous Protected Area (IPA), the IPA helps manage the land in traditional ways and provides support to the local community. As teachers, we need to introduce Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander Perspectives into the classroom, and this video is great in the way that it has local Aboriginal people talking about their land and what their land means to them. It also shows the importance of maintaining the land that their ancestors had once lived in, and how the whole community contributes and works together.

 

Activity ideas: After watching the video, brainstorm what the students saw was happening in the community and how did each person contribute to maintaining their land. Important question: “Why is it significant that Aboriginal People have a role in helping maintain that area?” “What does the land mean to Aboriginal People? What is the significance?”

Organise group work (in groups of 5/6 students), on a piece of butcher’s paper, draw out a table with 3 columns:

First column: How do Indigenous Aboriginals look after their land?

Second column: Why do you think it is important for them to look after their land?

Third column: How can we help after our land?

 

Allow students to share their work with the rest of the class, this allows for students to gain a wider view and other possible points they may not have considered.

 

To look for more information on what the IPA does, visit:

http://www.environment.gov.au/indigenous/ipa/

 

For more information on Paruku and its community, visit:

http://www.environment.gov.au/indigenous/ipa/declared/paruku.html

 

This activity and resource will be useful for classrooms in Stage 2 HSIE.

Outcome: ENS2.6 Describes people’s interactions with environments and identifies responsible ways of interacting with environments

Dot Point: Local and other Australian communities

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society & Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

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