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Robo-pets may contribute to quality of life for those with dementia

Robo-pets may contribute to quality of life for those with dementia | OT & Dementia | Scoop.it

A study has found that interacting with a therapeutic robot companion made people with mid- to late-stage dementia less anxious and also had a positive influence on their quality of life.  

 

The pilot study, a collaboration led by Professor Wendy Moyle from Griffith University, Australia and involving Northumbria University’s Professor Glenda Cook and researchers from institutions in Germany, investigated the effect of interacting with PARO – a robotic harp seal – compared with participation in a reading group. The study built on Professor Cook’s previous ethnographic work carried out in care homes in North East England.

PARO is fitted with artificial intelligence software and tactile sensors that allow it to respond to touch and sound. It can show emotions such as surprise, happiness and anger, can learn its own name and learns to respond to words that its owner uses frequently.

 

Eighteen participants, living in a residential aged care facility in Queensland, Australia, took part in activities with PARO for five weeks and also participated in a control reading group activity for the same period. Following both trial periods the impact was assessed, using recognised clinical dementia measurements, for how the activities had influenced the participants’ quality of life, tendency to wander, level of apathy, levels of depression and anxiety ratings.


Via Ashish Umre
Claire Morrisby's insight:

If you want to see PARO in real life there's a couple at Alzheimers WA. They are used to great effect in the Mary Chester Centre in Shenton Park. 

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Brain Implants Could Help Alzheimer’s and Others with Severe Memory Damage | MIT Technology Review

Brain Implants Could Help Alzheimer’s and Others with Severe Memory Damage | MIT Technology Review | OT & Dementia | Scoop.it
A maverick neuroscientist believes he has deciphered the code by which the brain forms long-term memories.
Claire Morrisby's insight:

Technology is advancing at such a great rate; this research has implications for people with dementia as well other forms of brain damage.

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Don't Trust Online Tests for Alzheimer's Disease

Don't Trust Online Tests for Alzheimer's Disease | OT & Dementia | Scoop.it
A new report calls online quizzes unethical and criticizes their hosts for preying on vulnerable older surfers.
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Death: what are your choices? - Health & Wellbeing

Death: what are your choices? - Health & Wellbeing | OT & Dementia | Scoop.it
Most of us avoid thinking and talking about death, but that needs to change if we want any say over the kind of death we have.
Claire Morrisby's insight:

Dying well is an important part of peoples journy through Dementia. It is especially important to have these conversations early in in the process as the legal documents mentioned (EPG & ACD) need to be completed while the person is judged to be competent to make these decisions.

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Mistreated nursing home residents 'better off in a concentration camp' - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Mistreated nursing home residents 'better off in a concentration camp' - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | OT & Dementia | Scoop.it
The ABC has uncovered shocking claims that people are being left to die unnecessarily because of a lack of critical staff and training in nursing homes.
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Study: Later retirement may help prevent dementia

Study: Later retirement may help prevent dementia | OT & Dementia | Scoop.it
BOSTON (AP) — New research boosts the "use it or lose it" theory about brainpower and staying mentally sharp.
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Rescooped by Claire Morrisby from Social Foraging
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Robo-pets may contribute to quality of life for those with dementia

Robo-pets may contribute to quality of life for those with dementia | OT & Dementia | Scoop.it

A study has found that interacting with a therapeutic robot companion made people with mid- to late-stage dementia less anxious and also had a positive influence on their quality of life.  

 

The pilot study, a collaboration led by Professor Wendy Moyle from Griffith University, Australia and involving Northumbria University’s Professor Glenda Cook and researchers from institutions in Germany, investigated the effect of interacting with PARO – a robotic harp seal – compared with participation in a reading group. The study built on Professor Cook’s previous ethnographic work carried out in care homes in North East England.

PARO is fitted with artificial intelligence software and tactile sensors that allow it to respond to touch and sound. It can show emotions such as surprise, happiness and anger, can learn its own name and learns to respond to words that its owner uses frequently.

 

Eighteen participants, living in a residential aged care facility in Queensland, Australia, took part in activities with PARO for five weeks and also participated in a control reading group activity for the same period. Following both trial periods the impact was assessed, using recognised clinical dementia measurements, for how the activities had influenced the participants’ quality of life, tendency to wander, level of apathy, levels of depression and anxiety ratings.


Via Ashish Umre
Claire Morrisby's insight:

If you want to see PARO in real life there's a couple at Alzheimers WA. They are used to great effect in the Mary Chester Centre in Shenton Park. 

more...
No comment yet.