Origins and Backgrounds of People in the Local Community (Cabramatta)
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52 suburbs: suburb no. 5: Cabramatta

52 suburbs: suburb no. 5: Cabramatta | Origins and Backgrounds of People in the Local Community (Cabramatta) | Scoop.it
Jessica Goldstein's insight:

This website, “A Search for Beauty in the Sydney Burbs,” is dedicated to a photographic exploration of 52 Sydney suburbs by the artist, Louise Hawson. Within this broad framework, Hawson has compiled a beautiful selection of images to explore the multicultural suburb of Cabramatta. Students in Stage 2 HSIE could use this resource to explore and discuss the different cultures of people who live in their local community of Cabramatta. It is a valuable online resource because it features a good range of both visual and written information to engage students through a variety of modes, which could be very useful to developing literacy across both visual and written texts.

 

The website features photographs and brief descriptions of a range of Cabramatta’s local people of different ages, cultures and religions with different beliefs and dress; it features elements of cultural practices and diverse places of worship; significant buildings and rituals; images from the local celebration for Chinese Moon Festival; commercial shops; artworks; healing medicines; and foods from the area. Students could use this online resource as a starting point to discuss their own responses to their local area, and to share what they recognise and/or think is missing from the website. Students could then be given a photographic project of their own—to build their own visual representation and community profile of the people in their local area.

 

Afterwards, students can be encouraged to broaden their study to engage with global perspectives, by using the link on the left hand side of the website ( entitled “52 Suburbs Around the World”), to view Hawson’s photographic profiles of suburbs from around the world. An assessment could be set whereby students draw a comparison between people’s lives and backgrounds in a suburb overseas with those in their own community.

 

Relevant for the 'cultural' strand of HSIE studies with children in Stage Two. Following outcomes: * CUS2.3: Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities; and * CUS2.4: Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities. Specific content descriptor: “Origins and backgrounds of people in the local community.” 

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Australian Social Trends, 2014: Where Do Migrants Live?

Australian Social Trends, 2014: Where Do Migrants Live? | Origins and Backgrounds of People in the Local Community (Cabramatta) | Scoop.it
Jessica Goldstein's insight:

This resource is useful for exploring the importance and effects of migration within the Australian Community. It includes information about the large number of people in Cabramatta who have a migrant background, and looks at the broad trends related to where people who migrate to Australia tend to settle. The website gives interesting national statistics on diversity. For example, it states that in 2011 there were more than 5.3 million migrants in Australia and hence one in every four (26%) Australian residents were born overseas. Students could be encouraged to compare such national statistics to their own suburb, and then to suburbs overseas.

 

This resource may be useful for use in a Stage 2 learning environment for a whole range of reasons, including helping a student to build their numeracy skills by collecting data and comparing numbers and statistics to build a profile of their own community. Students could then compare their profile to other surrounding and/or distant communities, gaining a global perspective of migration. Overall, the website looks at where people from different countries tend to settle, and students can look at the number of people settling in urban versus rural areas. Particularly useful is the table featured in the resource entitled: “Top Suburbs for Migrants in Australia By Capital City”, in which Cabramatta features with a percentage of 68.4%. Also useful is a map which visually shows where high numbers of migrants settle. Students can develop their map reading skills and learn to link visual information with the written information provided on the site. Students can also be encouraged to design and perform their own survey to research where people in their class/school/local communities come from.

 

>>> Stage 2. Cultural strand of NSW HSIE Syllabus. Following outcomes * CUS2.3: Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities; and * CUS2.4: Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities. Specific content descriptor: “Origins and backgrounds of people in the local community.” 

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Aboriginal people and place - Barani

Aboriginal people and place - Barani | Origins and Backgrounds of People in the Local Community (Cabramatta) | Scoop.it
Jessica Goldstein's insight:

This resource holds a wide range of information on the histories of Sydney with a focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The page entitled ‘Aboriginal People and Place’, written by Anita Heiss and Melodie-Jane Gibson, would be useful for a student to look at the range of Aboriginal groups in the Sydney area. The information shows, for example, that the Cabramatta region is ‘Cabrogal’ land, with the language group of this clan or band being the ‘Dharug’. Students can be supported to compare the different language groups and through doing so, begin to explore the diversity of Indigenous Australian communities. Students can learn to look at the map of Indigenous linguistic groups in Australia in 1788, and see where the Cabrogal land is in association with the land on which other groups lived. This historical information could then be built upon by engaging students on excursions to visit members of the local Indigenous community in their local area of Cabramatta.

 

The website also gives an important timeline of events in the Sydney region that are of importance to Indigenous and Torres Strait Islanders from 1770 onwards, which would assist students to build a historical framework for understanding Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander people’s experiences in different parts of Sydney. Overall, the site includes a wide range of information and resources about diverse experiences in Sydney that could be accessed by students throughout their ongoing studies, and the website gives full acknowledgement to contributors, and thus seems an ethical choice for including in the classroom.

 

>>> Stage 2. Cultural strand of NSW HSIE Syllabus. Following outcomes * CUS2.3: Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities; and * CUS2.4: Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities. Specific content descriptor: “Origins and backgrounds of people in the local community.” 

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Growing up in Cabramatta - Luke Nguyen

Growing up in Cabramatta - Luke Nguyen | Origins and Backgrounds of People in the Local Community (Cabramatta) | Scoop.it
Childhood. Luke grew up in Cabrammatta where he first learned to cook his family's Vietnamese recipes.
Jessica Goldstein's insight:

This is an online interview with Luke Nguyen, the well-known chef and owner of the "Red Lantern" restaurant in Sydney. In the interview, Nguyen describes his migrant family background and his experiences of growing up in his home suburb of Cabramatta.  He describes how his family migrated from Vietnam to Australia and supported themselves by running a restaurant;  how his family had a strong work ethic, and how he, like many children of migrant parents, was required to work hard from an early age to the support his family. Nguyen’s interview talks of the rich Vietnamese community in Cabramatta that maintains a strong connection to cultural heritage, and he emphasises his attachment to both culture and country of Australia and Vietnam.

 

At one level, the interview is useful for exploring the passing on of knowledge and traditions from one generation to the next. For, Nguyen emphasises how much he quickly learned to love cooking from his family, and how he developed a real appreciation for fresh produce, cooking techniques and his authentic family food traditions. This resource could be useful for a Stage Two student who is looking at the diversity of experiences in their local community; for looking at family traditions and responsibilities; and for looking at the migrant experience over generations in Australia.  Students could be encouraged to partake in a range of activities, including:

 

>> Compare Nguyen’s experiences to their own. e.g. duties and responsibilities; family responsibilities; cultural heritage; passions and interests.

>> Research the stories of children who have migrated to Australia, or whose parents have migrated.

>> Explore the following question: why is it valuable that people hold onto their cultural heritage, e.g. build links between Australia and Vietnam?

>> Students could be encouraged to interview a person from Cabramatta who inspires them, and then present the interview to the class.

 

This text is also useful because it provides the opportunity for student to listen to an oral story. Children can be supported to listen to, and create their own oral stories.

 

>>> Stage 2. Cultural strand of NSW HSIE Syllabus. Following outcomes * CUS2.3: Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities; and * CUS2.4: Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities. Specific content descriptor: “Origins and backgrounds of people in the local community.” 

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One Day In Cabramatta

Jessica Goldstein's insight:

This resource is an online commemorative book, called "One Day in Cabramatta" that showcases a community story-telling project that was run in the Cabramatta local community over a period of seven weeks in 2012 (in partnership with the SBS and Information Cultural Exchange (ICE)). The project was designed to give voice to local community members about their personal stories, experiences, memories, and aspirations for contemporary Cabramatta, and hundreds of people participated in sharing their story.

 

Students in stage 2 HSIE who are studying the cultural strand of the NSW Syllabus, can use this online book (possibly in conjunction with elements of an associated documentary series called: Once upon a Time in Cabramatta, and online social media material linked to the project) to look at the diversity of the Cabramatta community today, and the range of experiences that locals bring to their community. Students can print out and read the story cards that prompt thinking around questions such as: What do you love about Cabramatta? What is life like for you in this suburb? What do you wish you could change?

 

Some people’s stories that are  featured in the book, talk about the dangers experienced before arriving in Australia; others talk about what they like about Cabramatta – ranging from the food to the diversity of people. Some people talk about how their connection to the place has changed over time; others write of the hope Cabramatta holds for genuine multiculturalism. Issues of loneliness and the difficulties of learning a new language are raised; and so are notions of home, familiarity and having links to community and heritage. People from all different backgrounds share their story to the project.

 

Many photos accompany the stories, so students who are developing literacy skills can draw on both written and visual cues to explore the significance of the stories.Students can be encouraged to write their own story of Cabramatta and compare it to others featured in the book. The class as a whole can compile its own digital book. Students can be encouraged to choose story cards that are particularly striking to them, and be supported to research more about that topic. Teachers could support students to move into a study of refugee experiences which would require additional learning resources.

 

Also useful from this online resource, is timeline of Cabramatta’s history. As a class, students can be encouraged to make their own timeline of Cabramatta’s history with issues that are meaningful to them, their classmates and their community.

 

>> Stage 2: Cultural strand of HSIE NSW Syllabus. Following outcomes * CUS2.3: Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities; and * CUS2.4: Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities. Specific content descriptor: “Origins and backgrounds of people in the local community.” 

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