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Developing healthy organisations
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Being Leader-ish: When You’re Not Quite a Leader

Being Leader-ish: When You’re Not Quite a Leader | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
  ish. This is the word we use when something is stuck between being and not being. Between is and is not. For example, we might say, ...

Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Great-ish article on committing - ish... 

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donhornsby's curator insight, October 25, 2013 7:02 AM

(From the article): Every leader, at one time or another, has probably done something leader-ish. Because leadership is not always easy, and sometimes we instinctively seek convenience.

 

But true character-based leadership emerges through discomfort. Ours, and others. It requires focusing our attention on how we can make others shine. Making mindful judgment calls. Getting things done through others, and winning their hearts and minds in the process. Handling people as unique individuals. Looking beyond our positions to the behaviors and choices that are best for our employees, for the team, for the organization, and its customer.

 

Are you a leader, or leader-ish?

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 26, 2013 5:47 PM

Every leader, at one time or another, has probably done something leader-ish. Because leadership is not always easy, and sometimes we instinctively seek convenience.

Zian Peak's curator insight, May 6, 10:29 AM

Now there is a word for those inbetweeners-  'Leader-ish'.  

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The Antidote to Ambiguity: Values-Based Leadership

The Antidote to Ambiguity: Values-Based Leadership | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

What is your mission statement? How many people in your organization have read it? Understand it? Remember it? BELIEVE IT? And, how many of those who remain after answering those questions have actually adopted it?


Management books universally extol the importance of a mission statement. I have both suffered through mission development exercises as a staff member and been hired to facilitate these sessions. The process goes something like this: a group of senior administrators lock themselves in a room for an extended period of time; they debate, compromise, and craft lofty prose until they finally unveil (white smoke from chimney) their UNIFYING DOCUMENT. Shortly thereafter, they proudly display their statements on websites, placards, and business cards, then sit back and wait for the wisdom to trickle down to the masses. Much to their surprise, little change occurs.


Read more: http://www.unconventional-leadership.com/2012/03/15/the-antidote-to-ambiguity-values-based-leadership/


Via Martin Gysler
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8 Rules For Creating A Passionate Work Culture

8 Rules For Creating A Passionate Work Culture | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Hire for passion and commitment first, experience second, and credentials third. You don’t want to be simply a stepping stone on an employee’s journey toward their own passion.

 

Several years ago I was in the Thomson Building in Toronto. I went down the hall to the small kitchen to get myself a cup of coffee. Ken Thomson was there, making himself some instant soup. At the time, he was the ninth-richest man in the world, worth approximately $19.6 billion. Enough, certainly, to afford a nice lunch. I looked at the soup he was stirring. “It suits me just fine,” he said, smiling.

 

Thomson understood value. Neighbors reported seeing him leave his local grocery store with jumbo packages of tissues that were on sale. He bought off-the-rack suits and had his old shoes resoled. Yet he had no difficulty paying almost $76 million for a painting (for Peter Paul Rubens’s Massacre of the Innocents, in 2002). He sought value, whether it was in business, art, or groceries.

 

Read more: http://bit.ly/MI5das


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