Organisation Development
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Leadership Lessons from GM’s Mary Barra

Leadership Lessons from GM’s Mary Barra | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Important leadership lessons from the new CEO of GM, Mary Barra. Barra embodies the very essence of a 21st century global leader, and she is a leader whom I have come to truly admire. Here are some of the lessons we can learn from her steady thirty-three year rise at one of the world’s largest corporations:
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Quiet leadership and expanding hedgehogs!

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Organisation Development
Developing healthy organisations
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Agile working: Key characteristics of an agile worker - Pearnkandola

Many organisations are looking at developing more effective agile working strategies to enable their people to work with more flexibility, freedom and time/cost efficiency. The immediate focus for these organisations is often on the technology and work space solutions to ensure their teams are equipped to work anywhere with WiFi and a power source.
What often gets overlooked or ignored – sometimes because it is simply too difficult – is the way that people respond and adapt to agile working. The psychology behind agile working is interesting and not at all straightforward, and so in this article I will explore some of the important findings from our own research and work with leaders in this field.
Over a period of five years we were invited, by one of the world’s leading technology companies, to get involved in researching the impact of agile and remote working on their leaders and teams.
We looked in particular at the psychological impact on team members and their leaders, as well as the performance implications and productivity. Through a series of interviews, live observation of interactions between teams that were using video and telecoms technology, as well as gathering data on the personality and attitudes of leaders and their teams, we built a picture of what it takes to be successful in an agile environment.
So, lets examine in more detail one of the key findings, which is that there are definite characteristics that enable some people to be better and more effective working in an agile environment.
David Hain's insight:

Stuart Duff on why some people suit agile working and others struggle. Good starting point for appropriate interventions...

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Top 10 Talent Practices

Top 10 Talent Practices | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

I am a big fan of top 10 lists. I make them all the time.  To name a few: “Top song covers that are better than the original”, “Top hockey fights”, “Best movie sequels”, “Most underrated guitar players.” I could do that all day.  So when a friend of mine asked me what talent practices are on my short list, I jumped at the challenge of turning it into a top 10 list.  

Here are the criteria for the list:

Low cost and/or high return on investment – The cost of most of these are more about time than money, some may require investment but they are high return
Non-technology – There are many important talent management technology innovations out there, but that is a separate list
Not dependent on size of company - I tried to include practices that equally apply to large and small companies
Here is the list, it is numbered but that is not indicative of importance or value:

David Hain's insight:

This is a good list of the most effective ways to nurture your people. And it's all simple stuff!

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How To Build A Winning Organizational Culture 

How To Build A Winning Organizational Culture  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We are at an important inflection point. For most business organizations to survive and thrive, they must innovate. Innovation requires a business culture of purpose, values, and relationship capital. Many leaders have had the false belief that their organization’s culture was not a lever that they could effectively manage for higher levels of performance. Culture is often overlooked as a business driver because it’s an asset without a dollar value. Leaders need to assess and implement new operating models that leverage the innate purpose, values, and creativity of the individual and the team with the flexibility and efficiency of technology.
David Hain's insight:

Nice mini case studies on the effectiveness of measuring relationship capital!

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 28, 10:39 AM
For many organizations to compete effectively in the marketplace, they will need to cooperate effectively within their organization and with customers, partners, and suppliers. This may require them to nurture and shape their culture by capturing and building relationship capital.
 
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The Fish Rots From The Tail, While The Head Is Clueless

The Fish Rots From The Tail, While The Head Is Clueless | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Hierarchies have odd effects on us, physically and mentally. Where we sit in a power structure can influence our stress levels, our ability to cooperate, and even how we perceive the reality of our organizations.
We’ve just completed an analysis of more than 500 organizations and a pattern that emerged from the data was one that we see all too often with our clients: your perception of your organization’s commitment to its people is correlated with your position in that organization.
The higher up you are, the better your workplace seems (not just for you, but for everyone else, too).
David Hain's insight:

Appears our perception of organisational health is skewed by where we sit. All the more reason for seeking out others in a non-homogeneous space!

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Appreciative Inquiry Supports the Journey to Teal 

Appreciative Inquiry Supports the Journey to Teal  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
In many organizations, the longing for wholeness, more appreciation, a sense of purpose, and – at least to some extent – self-management is noticeable, even in organizations not aware of the Teal or Reinventing Organizations context.

Appreciative Inquiry is a value-oriented change and development process that starts from and is based on creating a safe space in which people feel seen and appreciated as whole human beings. On this basis, they are able to contribute fully, listen into their shared purpose, and create the desired future in a more and more self-managed way.

All three Teal breakthroughs of Wholeness, Evolutionary Purpose, and Self-Management are in-built qualities in the AI processes. And since it is a neutral process, any theme, as well as the breakthroughs themselves, can be addressed as a “core-theme.”

Since AI is such a powerful process and support structure, we want to tell you what this method is and to encourage you to experiment with it.
David Hain's insight:

Appreciative Inquiry - a mind and tool set that may just be the right one for these times of discord and confusion?

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The World Bank Makes Learning Central to Global Economic Development 

The World Bank Makes Learning Central to Global Economic Development  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
To solve the world’s big problems, countries have to share and share alike when it comes to information.
David Hain's insight:

In our uncertain future, learning collaboratively might be our greatest challenge!

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Your Company's Culture is Who You Hire, Fire, & Promote: Part 1, The Performance-Values Matrix

Your Company's Culture is Who You Hire, Fire, & Promote: Part 1, The Performance-Values Matrix | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

“The actual company values, as opposed to the nice-sounding values, are shown by who gets rewarded, promoted, or let go.”

- Netflix Culture: Freedom & Responsibility

Every time I walk into a new company I am advising, I invariably encounter a set of noble values that are prominently displayed on the walls. So the first thing I do is look past them by carefully observing how people really behave, which tells me what I actually need to know.

It’s not that most companies are disingenuous about the values they espouse. One of Enron’s “aspirational values” was integrity, which may have genuinely expressed who they wanted to be at the beginning. But over time, this did not reflect their “practiced values” of who they actually became when they committed fraud.

The gap between aspirational and practiced values is diagnostic of how much your company’s culture needs to improve. The actions you are taking to bridge the gap is prognostic of whether it will.

David Hain's insight:

It's how they walk, not how they talk! How to  spot the real culture through noticing incongruence!

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How to Make Raising Difficult Issues Everyone’s Job

How to Make Raising Difficult Issues Everyone’s Job | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
If you want people in your organization and leaders on your team to routinely raise difficult issues, regardless of who does or doesn’t benefit, you have to do more than let them know it’s safe to do so. You have to make it an expectation, and back it up with processes and behavior that reinforce it. Here are a few examples of what I’ve seen great organizations do.

David Hain's insight:

The candour dilemma. It's great to have and difficult to get - unless you plan and role model it...

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Focusing on what works for workplace diversity 

Focusing on what works for workplace diversity  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
For faster progress, companies need to draw on the power of design, rethink their assumptions, and use data to inform decision making.

The call for greater diversity in the boardroom and beyond hasn’t yet yielded significant change. Most efforts progress by inches, but companies that take a new tack to address unconscious bias and build a more inclusive workforce could turn the tide on gender issues. In this interview with McKinsey’s Rik Kirkland, Harvard Kennedy School professor of public policy Iris Bohnet talks about what is working—and what is not—when it comes to building a more equitable workplace. An edited version of her remarks follows.
David Hain's insight:

Use AI/big data to promote workplace diversity?

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Dianne Hofner Saphiere's curator insight, May 5, 12:41 PM
This is exactly why Cultural Detective is such an invaluable tool. It provides the ongoing, personalized, structured learning that research shows is key to developing intercultural competence. And our Ecotonos: A Simulation of Collaborating Across Differences develops the decision-making skills needed for diverse teams, organizations and communities.
Dianne Hofner Saphiere's curator insight, May 5, 12:42 PM
This is exactly why Cultural Detective is such an invaluable tool. It provides the ongoing, personalized, structured learning that research shows is key to developing intercultural competence. And our Ecotonos: A Simulation of Collaborating Across Differences develops the decision-making skills needed for diverse teams, organizations and communities.
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Twelve Forces That Will Radically Change How Organizations Work: The New New Way of Working

Twelve Forces That Will Radically Change How Organizations Work: The New New Way of Working | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
A tidal wave of change is coming that will soon make the way we work almost unrecognizable to today’s business leaders. In an age of rapidly evolving technologies, business models, demographics, and even workplace attitudes—all shifting concurrently—change is not only constant but also exponential in its pace and scope. Companies from startups and online businesses to incumbents in all industries will experience the effects in far-reaching and transformational ways.

During a comprehensive, yearlong analysis of the global work landscape, The Boston Consulting Group identified 60 major trends propelling this tidal wave, which we’ve grouped into 12 primary forces. These forces, or megatrends, fall into four categories. The first two address changes in the demand for talent: technological and digital productivity and shifts in ways of generating business value. The second two address changes in the supply of talent: shifts in resource distribution and changing workforce cultures and values
David Hain's insight:

Authoritative overview of the business conditions of the future!

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Human!

Human! | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

Who will pay people enough in a world where, say, we only need perform two hours of creative/caring/problem solving tasks each day, rather than nine hours at the office coal face? "We ought to think about ways to make it easier and better not to be employed," urges Peter Frase, a leading "post-workist" thinker and author.

One of those ways, suggests Microsoft's effervescent founder Bill Gates, might be simply to tax the robots. While that is an entertaining notion, it is too simplistic - punishing successful firms whose success may not actually be robot related - and will only deter companies from investing in AI, slowing the revolution. Another way, and one that is actually being trialled, is the notion of a universal basic income in which nation states funnel tax dollars back to households in a low-work economy.

To many on the left this will sound like socialism's due dividend, a lifelong payout to compensate for evil old technology's two centuries of job theft. To the right, it will seem like a major league, undeserved welfare handout. Whatever you call it, hats off to Finland for being brave enough to test it. The diminutive nation is giving 2000 unemployed people €560 per month for two years to see how such a scheme fares - and they will still get it even if they find work. Initial reports suggest it is popular with some people - giving the entrepreneurially-minded  a safety net while they dabble with getting creative businesses like video making and web design off the ground.

Machines that perform the amazing feat of mimicking human brains are going to need equally amazing social innovation like Finland's if we are to learn to cope with it. It is worth the candle because far from being the amusingly mediocre construct Turing initially envisioned, AI will relieve us of so much drudge work.

David Hain's insight:

More on being more human, actually and paradoxically helped by the rise of the machines!

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How to Tell Stories and Weave a Cohesive Narrative With Data

How to Tell Stories and Weave a Cohesive Narrative With Data | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
One of the most important steps you can take to turn numbers into narrative is to outline or storyboard your story like you would any other story, ignoring the data itself, and focusing on the flow of the arguments. For instance, say you have data about your company’s sales and you need to make a report for your CEO. What do you do?

First, you figure out KWYRWTS – my acronym, which is the worst acronym ever, but stands for a really important idea: Know What You Really Want to Say.

So let’s say your sales figures are way down this quarter. But you know the main reason is because your European office had a huge dip in sales due to the debate around and subsequent passage of the Brexit referendum. Clearly that is going to be the focus of your story. That’s your KWYRWTS. Maybe there are two main points, or three, but you have to know exactly what they are!

So you create a storyboard and decide the narrative flows like so:
David Hain's insight:

Numbers are illuminating but boring. Stories entice attention. Put the two together...

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Ryan Pisani's curator insight, April 20, 5:44 AM

Bill Shander here concisely makes a point on how and why story-telling is key when presenting...the rest just flows...

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The psychology of living environments

The psychology of living environments | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Thoreau discovered that in order to create space in the mind for seeing ‘the new’, we best immerse ourselves in living environments. He found when people are surrounded by ‘man-made’ things, in ‘man-made’ environments, it seemingly inhibited their ability to see, and respond to, what could be meaningful and different in our world.
Fast forward to today, and neuroscientists are starting to put rigor behind Thoreau’s philosophical observations. Indeed, their scientific research makes a compelling case for rethinking the design of our buildings and places.
David Hain's insight:

Design has a big place in organisation development!

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, April 18, 12:00 PM

When we connect with nature we become increasingly aware of what resiliency is and how to incorporate it into how we live.

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5 ways companies can attract and retain female talent 

5 ways companies can attract and retain female talent  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
The calls for gender balance have been going on for years, yet organisations still struggle to source, attract and retain top female talent. Changes in the basic nature of our workplaces accompanied by demographic shifts of declining and aging populations, it’s clear that recruitment practises need to be re-assessed or even completely revamped to attract and retain female talent. The days of dipping into the “old boys” network to produce candidates just like themselves should be long gone. Yet they linger. With strong business cases for gender balance highlighted by leading global organisations and large companies publicly taking the initiative at CEO level, there is still much work to done and changes to be made.

Research from Deloitte suggests that the demographic to involve more pro-actively is at middle management level. With organisations still sourcing and  interviewing candidates in traditional ways, affinity and confirmation bias play a key role in selection choices. There is no doubt that despite the wide publicised gender dividend the female talent pipeline has at best a stress fracture and in some parts a massive leak. It needs a serious fix.
David Hain's insight:

None of these positive discrimination practices looks difficult - yet still we struggle to improve gender balance!

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10 companies that are great at empathy

10 companies that are great at empathy | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
If this year’s index is anything to go by, that change might already be taking place. Take Ryanair, the budget airline with a somewhat chequered history when it comes to customer service. Last year it finished second from bottom in the index.

Perhaps it was the repeat profit warnings, but the company realized change was needed: low prices weren’t going to be enough to keep customers coming back. So it embarked on what has been described as a Damascene conversion.

Through its Always Getting Better programme, Ryanair set about listening to customer feedback and scrapping the policies people didn’t like – unallocated seating, draconian luggage rules and hidden charges.

The new approach is already paying off: this year Ryanair not only increased net profits, but it climbed 13 places in the Empathy Index. Proof that empathy isn’t just about being a nice guy: it makes good business sense.

You can see the full 2016 Empathy Index here.
David Hain's insight:

Nice little tale about Europe's formerly most hated airline seeing the light - and improving the bottom line as well as the customer experience!

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The insidious problem of men not taking parental leave, resilience and the mental stress of Brexit

The insidious problem of men not taking parental leave, resilience and the mental stress of Brexit | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Jamie Lawrence, Editor, HRZone: What will crack the insidious problem of men just not feeling able to take parental leave or even admit to employers they want to spend time caring for their children?

Sir Cary Cooper, Professor of Organizational Psychology and Health, Manchester Business School: It’s a really big issue. Men don’t apply for parental leave or flexible working as much as woman do and that is a real issue.

And the reason they don’t - I’ve done a big study funded by the Lottery fund and I did it with Working Families and a colleague from Lancaster - and we looked at both a large public and private sector body and tried to find out why men don’t do this.

And the answer was "it will adversely affect my career." Yet women apply - they also feel it will adversely affect their career but not to the same extent that men do.

Because for men it’s about them feeling that the organisation will think they’re less committed - and they’re not, and won’t be, they are just trying to engage with their family and participate and be ‘new mannish’ and get some good balance between work and life but what inhibits them is the fear that taking flexible working and parental leave will adversely affect their careers.
David Hain's insight:

Job anxiety affecting parental leave - can't be a good thing!

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Getting to the Critical Few Behaviors That Can Drive Cultural Change

Getting to the Critical Few Behaviors That Can Drive Cultural Change | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Focusing on a “critical few” behaviors is one of the fundamental tenets of working effectively with organizational culture. Sometimes called keystone behaviors, these are patterns of acting that are tangible, repeatable, observable, and measurable, and will contribute to achieving an organization’s strategic and operational objectives. The behaviors are critical because they will have a significant impact on business performance when exhibited by large numbers of people; they are few because people can really only remember and change three to five key behaviors at one time.

In the work done by Katzenbach Center consultants around the world, we have seen how a focus on a critical few behaviors helps bring about changes that contribute to meaningful business outcomes, whether it is a medical devices manufacturer tallying 10 straight quarters of revenue growth or a technology firm saving US$100 million a year in warranty costs.
David Hain's insight:

Are you clear on the few critical behaviours you are trying to leverage for your organisations growth?

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Andrea Ross's curator insight, June 6, 7:57 AM

The recruitment industry can be pretty volatile which makes it even more important for recruitment leaders to embrace change than to shy away from it. Whether it be implementing new initiatives, changing current behaviors that entice success all need buy in from your current workforce and accountability from management to see it through. Happy Reading and Happy Friday. 

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 7, 12:37 PM

Interesting...

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Create a Can-Do Learning Culture 

Create a Can-Do Learning Culture  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

Ttoo often, when hands-on managers get involved in doing work they behave in ways that can limit their team’s learning. They jump into the fray, heads down, and plow through the work like the individual contributors they used to be. Or worse, they become micromanagers who encourage boss-dependence.


What’s needed is for these hands-on managers to first learn how to think differently about their dual roles as both players and managers. Instead of being held back by orthodox management thinking that encourages managers to think in terms of “either I’m leading my team or I’m doing work,” these hands-on managers need to shift their thinking about workforce development to a mindset that says “I can do work and do it in ways that accelerate learning for my team members.” Then leading and doing become mutually reinforcing, ongoing activities.

Once hands-on managers adopt this “both/and” mindset, they can begin to recognize the many opportunities they have to create a learning culture while working with their team members. But the key to taking full advantage of these opportunities is for hands-on leaders to learn some trainable skills.

David Hain's insight:

The difference between either/or, versus both/and, is vital to continued organisation development!

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What Gets You Up in the Morning?

What Gets You Up in the Morning? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
What keeps you up at night? It’s a question we’ve heard posed in nearly every panel and senior leader interview conducted in recent years, and as a result, it has become tiresome and rote. But I believe the effect of this query is more pernicious than simply boring — stay awake long enough to think it through, and you’ll recognize its essentially negative nature. The question assumes that leaders are in the habit — indeed, that they have a responsibility — to let worry pervade their every hour, even those precious few required to refresh, balance, and sustain human effort.

That’s why it was bracing to hear the chief economist of a global bank describe how his CEO responded to this question at a recent meeting of senior employees. “I’m sick of that question,” the CEO had said. “Besides, it misses the point. More important is: What makes me leap out of bed in the morning?”
David Hain's insight:

Why do you bother? Maybe the answer is also a key to good OD...

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Ian Berry's curator insight, June 4, 12:21 AM
I like the reference to "challenge the process" If stuff is keeping you awake at night and/or you're getting up in the morning not looking forward to the day ahead then respectfully I suggest you must challenge your processes
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Why Organizations Need Chief Knowledge Curators 

Why Organizations Need Chief Knowledge Curators  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
To ensure that his team is always in tune and aligned with a common approach to drive strategic vision, Amazon.com Inc.’s CEO Jeff Bezos created a corporate book club; he requires his team to read books curated by himself. Leaders like Bezos understand how the absence of structured knowledge sharing creates room for unproductive discussions, silos and lack of genuine commitment to the execution effort.

On the other hand, with leader-led knowledge sharing, organizations can influence behavioral shifts that align their vision with those of their employees, customers, stakeholders and communities. Why don’t more leaders adopt this deliberate knowledge sharing to drive business success?

Leaders recognize that effective execution is greater than half of the leadership challenge when it comes to improving performance via strategic change. Too frequently, however, we still seek solutions from the same toolkit, which has not previously delivered results. To drive effective strategy execution, companies need to embrace the potential their leaders have to influence organizational conversations by deliberately curating and sharing knowledge using digital communication channels.
David Hain's insight:

Knowledge sharing - the urgency of successful organisation development?

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Reimagining Performance Recognition� – Rob Peters – Medium

Reimagining Performance Recognition� – Rob Peters – Medium | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Businesses understand that employees stay with their companies for foundational reasons. Despite the popular notion that a competitive salary is a preeminent reason why employees commit to their positions, the fact, employees commit to their roles because they are vested in their duties and feel interlocked to the business and its goals. The truth is competitive salary ranks fifth on the list of reasons why employees stay with their firms. But having and retaining committed employees does not occur with the turn of a switch. Organizations build this level of relationship capital by interacting, supporting and publicly (and privately) acknowledging individual and team success.
The Relationship Capital (RC) Recognition Game as enabled by the Peer SaaS platform is one reimagined way to acknowledge and reward your employees by leveraging technology, commitment, and cultural mindset. It’s not just the right thing to do for your employees, but it also comes with a high R.O.I.
David Hain's insight:

Are you capturing and rewarding relationship capital?

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People & Organization Insights - Leadership & Human Resources Research

People & Organization Insights - Leadership & Human Resources Research | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Although companies are spending billions of dollars annually on leadership development and talent management, few are seeing the desired impact on business results.

The problem is both ongoing and systemic. In an annual global survey conducted over the last eight years, "managing talent" and "improving leadership development" have consistently remained in the red zone of future importance and low current capability. This situation has continued, despite exorbitant spend on leadership development and talent management. Among the factors handicapping leadership and talent initiatives are a focus on certification versus learning, fragmented talent management systems, and a disconnect between capabilities and business strategy.

These issues can be avoided—and business performance accelerated—by companies that are able to effectively link value creation with capability building and talent development. These companies stand to gain significant tangible value by getting it right.
David Hain's insight:

Th e prized is big if your organisation can harness talent in support of future value...

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A closer look at creatives | Nesta

A closer look at creatives | Nesta | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
The Government recently chose ‘developing skills’ to be one of ten key pillars in its Industrial Strategy. This was recognition that skills development is as important to growth as infrastructure, investment and trade. And the Government has invited the creative industries to reach a sector deal, showing how they plan to harness the ten pillars to boost productivity and enhance competitiveness.

But the creative industries face an information gap on skills: there is little granular evidence on the skills required by creative talent. And Brexit only heightens the need to better understand the skill requirements of the UK's creative talent, as many creative sub-sectors rely on European migrants to fill skill shortages. 

We've used data from online job adverts to identify the skill needs of creative workers.
David Hain's insight:

Lots of useful data on creatives!

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15-hour weeks, basic income and doughnuts. Are these the big ideas that could end inequality?

15-hour weeks, basic income and doughnuts. Are these the big ideas that could end inequality? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Inequality is, as Jaideep Prabhu, a Professor of Business at Cambridge University, writes, “the defining social, political and economic phenomenon of our time.” The latest Global Risks Report agrees. The report ranked “rising income and wealth disparity” as the most important trend that will shape the world in the next decade.

The rise of anti-establishment populism, as well as concerns about the revolution in robotics and artificial intelligence, suggest that a revival of economic growth alone may not be enough to address the widening gap between rich and poor.
With capitalism in need of fundamental reform, here is a list of some of the bold ideas that could challenge the status quo.
David Hain's insight:

Inequality is here, it's everywhere and it's changing our world faster than ever for the worse. We can let that happen, or promote some ideas to do something about it!

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Boss Support is Crucial — Here’s How to Improve It

Boss Support is Crucial — Here’s How to Improve It | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Leadership development programs often include retreats, classes, webinars, and other formal learning opportunities. But what happens before and after those formal programs has a major impact on the “return on learning” for participants?

When bosses are more engaged with their direct reports’ leadership development and more supportive of it, participants report they get more value. Our survey looked at 4 outcomes of leadership development: self-awareness, leadership capability, leadership effectiveness, and engagement. We also asked them about how supportive their bosses had been.

Those participants who rated support from their bosses as high had better outcomes than those who rated their boss support as moderate or low. In fact, those who rated their boss support as low tended to report program outcomes below the average level for all participants.

For example, in the engagement outcome, which measures how engaged participants felt at work because of the program, those with high boss support reported an average score of 8.1 (on a 10-point scale); those with low boss support reported an average of 6.5, or 21% lower.
David Hain's insight:

Limited point to HiPo interventions if you haven't got the bosses they are leaving and returning to onside!

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