Organisation Development
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Person 2 Person Engagement: The Top 5 Reasons Organizations Are Haemorrhaging Top Talent

Person 2 Person Engagement: The Top 5 Reasons Organizations Are Haemorrhaging Top Talent | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
RT @P2PEngagement: The Top 5 Reasons Organizations Are Hemorrhaging Top Talent! [infographic] http://t.co/ScfWd9lwG7
#HR #Leadership #Engag…
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Organisation Development
Developing healthy organisations
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Poorer than their parents? A new perspective on income inequality | McKinsey & Company

Poorer than their parents? A new perspective on income inequality | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

Most people growing up in advanced economies since World War II have been able to assume they will be better off than their parents. For much of the time, that assumption has proved correct: except for a brief hiatus in the 1970s, buoyant global economic and employment growth over the past 70 years saw all households experience rising incomes, both before and after taxes and transfers. As recently as between 1993 and 2005, all but 2 percent of households in 25 advanced economies saw real incomes rise.

Yet this overwhelmingly positive income trend has ended. A new McKinsey Global Institute report, Poorer than their parents? Flat or falling incomes in advanced economies, finds that between 2005 and 2014, real incomes in those same advanced economies were flat or fell for 65 to 70 percent of households, or more than 540 million people (exhibit). And while government transfers and lower tax rates mitigated some of the impact, up to a quarter of all households still saw disposable income stall or fall in that decade.

David Hain's insight:

This potentially corrosive issue won't go away without action!

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People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong | McKinsey 

People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong | McKinsey  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Over the past decade, big data analytics has been revolutionizing the way many companies do business. Chief marketing officers track detailed shopping patterns and preferences to predict and inform consumer behavior. Chief financial officers use real-time, forward-looking, integrated analytics to better understand different business lines. And now, chief human-resources officers are starting to deploy predictive talent models that can more effectively—and more rapidly—identify, recruit, develop, and retain the right people. Mapping HR data helps organizations identify current pain points and prioritize future analytics investments (exhibit). Surprisingly, however, the data do not always point in the direction that more seasoned HR officers might expect. Here are three examples.
David Hain's insight:

Big data and HR analytics insight. Useful for OD decision making!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 29, 5:09 AM
People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong | McKinsey
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Here's Why Viking Economics Are Superior

Here's Why Viking Economics Are Superior | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Sweden is not satisfied with its work/life balance and set up an experiment with the six-hour day in the city of Gothenburg. City workers will be divided randomly, with half continuing the eight-hour day and the other half engaging in the experiment. The goal is to gain higher productivity per hour and have fewer sick days. The researchers are encouraged by positive results from Toyota’s similar experiment in its Gothenburg factory.
David Hain's insight:

Will more leisure lead to higher productivity and less time off? Quite likely, according to this article...

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Why Nice Bosses Finish First

Overly tough bosses create stress, and lots of it, as the research shows: A University of London study found an especially strong link between heart disease and boss-inflicted stress, while a University of Concordia study found that employees who rate themselves as highly stressed added 46% to their employer’s health care costs. Research from the Institute of Naval Medicine found that overly tough bosses cause people to seek jobs elsewhere, to perform at a lower level, to decline promotions, and even to quit. Finally, a survey from Randstad Consulting showed that most employees would trade in their bosses for better ones rather than receive a $5,000 pay raise. People don’t leave jobs; they leave bad bosses.

The thing is, nice bosses don’t just prevent health and motivational problems among their employees; they create massive benefits that hard-nosed bosses can’t.
David Hain's insight:

If you're a boss, play nice to win. We'll, don't play, just bring out your best and others will follow...

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David Hain's curator insight, July 19, 5:18 AM

If you're a boss, play nice to win. We'll, don't play, just bring out your best and others will follow...

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 22, 12:48 AM
Great list of leadership characterisitics and love the John Maxwell quote too
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The Hard Science of Teamwork

The Hard Science of Teamwork | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Like many people, I’ve encountered teams that are “clicking.” I’ve experienced the “buzz” of a group that’s blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others’ minds. We think of building teams that operate on this plane as an art, or even magic. It’s not something you can plan; it’s lightning-in-a-bottle stuff that you just embrace when you’re lucky enough to come across it.

But to me, the buzz was so palpable, I decided that it must be a real, observable and measurable thing. I was motivated to find a way to document that buzz, and understand good teamwork as a hard science.

The team I lead at MIT’s Human Dynamics Laboratory has done just that. Using wearable electronic sensors called sociometric badges, we capture how people communicate in real time, and not only can we determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but we can also describe those characteristics mathematically. What’s more, we’ve discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.

My feature article in HBR’s April Spotlight on teams describes in detail the new science of building great teams. We can summarize those points here.
David Hain's insight:

Looks like an interesting and illuminating series on the sociology of teams, previewed here.

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Poor at 20, Poor for Life

Poor at 20, Poor for Life | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Overall, the probability of someone starting and ending their career in the same decile has gone up for every income rank. “For whatever reason, there was a path upward in the earnings distribution that has been blocked for some people, or is not as steep as it used to be,” Carr said.

Carr and Wiemers’ findings highlight a defining aspect of being middle class today, says Elisabeth Jacobs, the senior director for policy and academic programs at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, the left-leaning think tank that published Carr and Wiemers’ paper. “If you’re in the middle, you’re stuck in the middle, which means there’s less space for others to move into the middle,” she said. “That suggests there’s just a whole bunch of insecurity going on in terms of what it means to be a worker. You can’t educate your way up.”
David Hain's insight:

This s depressing news, and likely, in part, for the rise of Trump and the vote for Brexit. Much todo!

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Turn the Promise of Employee Advocacy Into Reality

Turn the Promise of Employee Advocacy Into Reality | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Here’s a question I hear a lot these days: “How can we get employees to start sharing brand content on social media?” 

Employee advocacy has finally bubbled up into the consciousness of senior marketers.  

In theory, that’s a good thing. After all, if employees aren’t willing to stand behind what your company does, why should customers? And getting cube-mates to amplify brand content on social media is a great way to break through the noise in a more authentic and cost-effective manner than advertising. 

So what’s the problem?

Employee advocacy is not a flip of the switch thing — it takes more than sending out a company-wide email asking everyone to tweet out the latest press release.  

If you want real and consistent participation across the organization, then employee advocacy needs to become part of your company culture. Here’s eight steps to help make that happen:
David Hain's insight:

Staff could be your best brand advocates - but are they? Often not where I consult!

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Good culture will boost company profits

Good culture will boost company profits | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Harvard Business School professor James Heskett says culture is set by the leaders of an institution, the chief executive and board, and represents the values of the organisation. But he adds that those values are meaningless without behaviours, measures and actions to support them.

He says strong adaptive cultures foster innovation, productivity and a sense of ownership among employees and customers, and most importantly, outlast leaders. 

In his book The Culture Cycle: How to Shape the Unseen Force that Transforms Performance, he argues that as much as half of the difference in operating profit between an organisation can be attributed to effective cultures.

Why? Because you end up with greater staff retention, which reduces the cost of recruiting and training, higher employee productivity, which means more sales, and better customer relationships,  which leads to greater loyalty and more sales.

David Hain's insight:

Culture and the bottom line. Just because it's intangible doesn't make it any less real!

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A Developmental Autobiography

A Developmental Autobiography | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
This is the third in a series of articles for the Integral Leadership Review in which I have attempted to explain my research on adult development. As readers of the previous two articles will note, I have explored this topic in depth by looking at Warren Buffett’s development and how it impacted his success, particularly as a leader. Following an Action Inquiry design (Torbert et al, 2004), the first article reported on the third-person findings from the research, ‘what was the research about, what methods of inquiry were used and what were the results’? In the second article I considered, ‘what are the second-person implications of the research for the field of leadership studies’? In this final article, I consider, from a first-person perspective, ‘what impact did the research have on me’? The answer is that it focussed attention on my own development – how had I changed and developed over my adult life? As I had created a Developmental Biography of Buffett’s adult life, I now created a Developmental Autobiography of my own, which I report on here.
David Hain's insight:

This framework should be hugely important for anyone interested in or practising Organisation Development!

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Meaningful meetings: how can meetings be made better? | Nesta

Meaningful meetings: how can meetings be made better? | Nesta | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Many of us spend much of our time in meetings and at conferences. But too often these feel like a waste of time, or fail to make the most of the knowledge and experience of the people present.

Meetings have changed, with much more use of online tools, and a growing range of different meeting formats. But our sense is that meetings could be much better run and achieve better results.

This paper tries to help. It summarises some of what is known about how meetings work well or badly; it makes recommendations about how to make meetings better; and showcases some interesting recent innovations. It forms part of a larger research programme at Nesta on collective intelligence which is investigating how groups and organisations can make the most of their brains, and of the technologies they use.

We hope the paper will be helpful to anyone designing or running meetings of any kind, and that readers will contribute good examples, ideas and evidence which can be added into future versions.
David Hain's insight:

How much of your time do you spend in meetings? Some NESTA ideas on how to spend it more valuably!

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The Amazing Ways Big Data And Analytics Are Used At Wimbledon 2016 

The Amazing Ways Big Data And Analytics Are Used At Wimbledon 2016  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
WIMBLEDON fans are being served a mash up of machine learning and advanced analytics in a bid to capture viewers’ attention on social media and digital platforms.

Statistics and analytics have been a big feature of grand slam tennis for some years now. But what’s new this year is Watson. 

IBM’s flagship AI-driven analytics platform has been tasked with crunching through the hundreds of thousands of social media and online posts which the event generates.

It’s mission will be to find the stories that fans are most engaged with, and drive creation of the sort of content that they most want to see.

And crucially, for the first time this year thanks to Watson’s machine learning capabilities, this will be a predictive process, rather than an attempt to piggyback trends once they occur.
David Hain's insight:

Innovative use of big data to answer the questions people are asking in real time! Lots of applications...

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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
This Concept Map, created with IHMC CmapTools, has information related to: Learning Theory v5, Organisation Kolb, Psychology Vygotsky, Psychology Bloom, Piaget genetic epistemology, Psychology Skinner, Montessori constructivism, Dewey constructivism, radical constructivism Knowledge as mental representation: 1a. Knowledge is not passively received either through the senses or by way of communication; 1b. Knowledge is actively built up by the cognising subject; 2a. The function of cognition is adaptive, in the biological sense of the term, tending towards fit or viability; 2b Cognition serves the subject’s organization of the experiential world, not the discovery of an objective ontological reality., social constructivism connectivism, Taylor Organisation, Holt homeschooling, unschooling, constructivism radical constructivism, Kolb experiental learning, Montessori Montessori education, Social anthropology Lave & Wenger, Vygotsky zone of proximal development, Lave & Wenger situated learning, Education Illich, scientific pedagogy Education based on science that modified and improved the individual., communities of practice Groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly.
David Hain's insight:

The orgs that learn best, develop best! Useful learning taxonomy coz it's a complex subject...

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Is the 70/20/10 learning mix out of date?

Is the 70/20/10 learning mix out of date? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Some recent research by DDI supports a view that 70/20/10 needs revision.

DDI did a survey of 13,000 leaders and asked them what experiences had contributed to their expertise, where had they learned the most and how they allocate their learning time.  Their results, published in the Global Leadership Forecast 2014|2015 found that rather than 70/20/10 the leaders actually spent 55% (on the job), 25% (learning from others in the work place) and 20% formal learning.

These results show a doubling of formal learning and a drop in informal experiential learning.

Lumesse say 50:26:24 is the average learning mix in most companies right now and given this new research and the pace of change this looks to be the right mix. But there is another factor to consider in my view.

Developing habit seems only to happen when the right formula is in place.
People will only change how they work if they create new behavioural habits. Some 70% of what people do is habit and that includes most of their job activities.  People must embed new ways of thinking and behaving so they become habitual – it just takes up too much brain energy to continually have to think about what to do next.

Developing habit seems only to happen when the right formula is in place. There is a cue, something that tells them it is time to act in the new way; a routine, the habit, and a sense of reward for doing the new behaviour.

This is where the support is needed in the work place. Managers must be able to help learners identify the cue, carry out the routine and provide positive reinforcement. Many managers don't know how to do this or even that this is part of their role. This is probably where the most impactful interventions could be made by learning practitioners but in my experience very few are doing this.

So rather than obsessing on the ratio mix maybe the focus should be on the amount of learning that is actually used back on the job consistently over time. Measuring this is where the real gains could be made.
David Hain's insight:

Critique of the 70:20:10 model.

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Ian Berry's curator insight, June 17, 5:00 PM
I don't believe the framework is out of date. It's creators always maintained it was a framework not a model. My most stable clients would mirror 70:20:10 Those undertaking big change 50:25:25 and other variances. The principles of the framework remain sound 
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What’s Your Story?

What’s Your Story? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Even the most artfully crafted story is worthless if is inauthentic, which is to say unrecognizable in the context of the company or person telling it (just ask any of current crop of US presidential candidates who have spent millions on advertising only to see their poll numbers fall through the floor). In our experience, the most powerful story of all—one that is compelling, authentic, and true—is rooted in one’s own experience. Smart organizations and their leaders know this. They act deliberately to capture what we call “heritage stories”— founding myths, remembered events, survival stories—and use them to help crystallize a sense of purpose, engage people in transformational change, and make them feel a part of something larger than themselves.
David Hain's insight:

A powerful argument that effective stories require depth, context and authenticity - when these are present, the results are compelling, as evidenced in the examples. Excellent and timely insight from  BeCause associate John Seaman and colleague Robert Ferguson.

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Corporate Mindfulness Training Programs Seeing a Boost

Corporate Mindfulness Training Programs Seeing a Boost | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Increasingly, companies are jumping on the mindfulness training bandwagon.
David Hain's insight:

Corporate mindfulness programmes burgeoning - good. But mustn't become a cult...

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5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future (Part 5)

5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future (Part 5) | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We are learning our way forward in developing leaders for the workplace of the future while they arelearning their way forward through complexity, economic challenges and catastrophic change. We will need to stay ahead of that curve to prepare them. 
David Hain's insight:

Useful series on leadership for tomorrow from the author of @7Lenses!

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The Connection Between Employee Trust and Financial Performance

The Connection Between Employee Trust and Financial Performance | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
A building surrounded by razor wire. A guard tower looming over the perimeter. Weeds and overgrowth flanking the grim exterior. Inside — drab colors, peeling paint, and dead plants decaying in the common areas. Was this a prison? No. This was the headquarters of Campbell Soup Company when one of us, Doug Conant, took the reins as CEO in 2001.

Was this a deliberate attempt to imprison employees and stifle their energy? No again. It was a vivid example of organizational leaders neglecting the importance of building trust.  Contrary to popular belief, cultivating a high-trust culture is not a “soft” skill — it’s a hard necessity. Put another way, it’s the foundational element of high-performing organizations.

Doug identified “Inspiring Trust” as his number one mission in his 10-year turnaround of Campbell Soup Company, where his efforts resulted in cumulative shareholder returns in the top tier of the global food industry, and among the highest measured employee engagement levels in the Fortune 500, particularly with his leadership team. While few leaders would argue against the idea that trust is necessary for building elite performance, not nearly enough realize the height of its importance and far too many disregard trust-building as a “soft” or “secondary” competency.
David Hain's insight:

If more evidence was needed (it isn't), a great case study on trust and the bottom line!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 29, 5:12 AM
The Connection Between Employee Trust and Financial Performance
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There’s an Alternative to Leadership Development

There’s an Alternative to Leadership Development | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Organizations worldwide have to develop their leaders with less time and money, and it’s not easy. Worse, most leadership development programs turn out to be ineffective and expensive. These programs provide little focus on the social, interpersonal and strategic aspects of leadership, and what’s learned is often difficult to apply. But there’s an alternative.

Action learning with a trained coach is a cost-effective approach that enables leaders to develop capabilities while working to solve urgent organizational or social problems. Essentially, leaders are learning while working, making it easy to see how learned skills apply on the job.

Details from “Action Learning and Leadership Development,” a research study on how action learning develops leaders were published in April. [Editor’s note: The author is one of the authors of the study.] The study reviewed nearly 150 papers from more than 30 countries, representing more than 200 action learning sessions. The review identified more than 100 instances where the skills practiced in the action learning session were transferred to the workplace.

Several key themes emerged:

David Hain's insight:

The many benefits of Action Learning. Saw this in action in 3  groups within the last week. Raise your cup to double loop learning!

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Why We’re Giving Our Employees a Raise

Why We’re Giving Our Employees a Raise | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We face many challenges. But they can be overcome by government, business and the nonprofit sectors working together to build on models of success that advance economic opportunity and create more widely shared prosperity.
David Hain's insight:

JP Morgan invests in employees and advocates collaboration. If I can silence my inner cynic, gotta be a good thing!

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Shaking up the UK’s status quo

Shaking up the UK’s status quo | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Few know more about the reality of life behind the UK's closed government doors than Francis Maude. Here, he tells us about the lessons gleaned from overseeing a radical programme of government reforms that continue to reverberate to this day
David Hain's insight:

Francis Maude on the challenges of transforming the Government ecosystem - very interesting and relevant to ur future society!

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The Surprising Link Between Laughter And Learning

The Surprising Link Between Laughter And Learning | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We’d failed. The executive who'd attended our kickoff presentation had rejected even our most basic premise. What he did manage to do, though, as we discovered after returning for a fresh meeting several weeks later, was recite a joke my colleague had told.

She didn't even remember telling it (it was about a consultant and a dog), but for whatever reason, it had stuck. That joke— which was immaterial, from our perspective, to the learning goals of the session—had somehow cracked our client’s brittle armor. Hearing him retell it eased us into an open conversation about his challenges leading the division. Ultimately, we emerged with a shared vision of what actually could help him.

Relaxing is key to learning. Learning is key to leadership. Laughter unlocks both.
David Hain's insight:

I know instinctively that learning and laughter are like fish and chips, but this article explains it a bit more.

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Implementation of Virtuous Behaviour In Modern Organizations – Positive Business

Implementation of Virtuous Behaviour In Modern Organizations – Positive Business | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Most organizations in the world are finding it hard trying to instill virtuousness in all their departments. It is not as if they are not attempting to have it instilled in their everyday activities but somehow they just can’t seem to make it work. Such case is majorly for those who tend to know its values and what it can bring to the organization in the long run. However, such implementation has not being possible in any way. This is based on the fact that there are factors or variables that have been able to slow down the implementation processes. The major aim of this write up is to critically analyze these factors and then point out how they can be briefly deal with.
David Hain's insight:

Is it possible to create a virtuous organisation? Here's one view on how to do it...

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Ahead of the curve: The future of performance management | McKinsey & Company

Ahead of the curve: The future of performance management | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
The worst-kept secret in companies has long been the fact that the yearly ritual of evaluating (and sometimes rating and ranking) the performance of employees epitomizes the absurdities of corporate life. Managers and staff alike too often view performance management as time consuming, excessively subjective, demotivating, and ultimately unhelpful. In these cases, it does little to improve the performance of employees. It may even undermine their performance as they struggle with ratings, worry about compensation, and try to make sense of performance feedback.

These aren’t new issues, but they have become increasingly blatant as jobs in many businesses have evolved over the past 15 years. More and more positions require employees with deeper expertise, more independent judgment, and better problem-solving skills. They are shouldering ever-greater responsibilities in their interactions with customers and business partners and creating value in ways that industrial-era performance-management systems struggle to identify. Soon enough, a ritual most executives say they dislike will be so outdated that it will resemble trying to conduct modern financial transactions with carrier pigeons.

Yet nearly nine out of ten companies around the world continue not only to generate performance scores for employees but also to use them as the basis for compensation decisions.1 The problem that prevents managers’ dissatisfaction with the process from actually changing it is uncertainty over what a revamped performance-management system ought to look like. If we jettison year-end evaluations—well, then what? Will employees just lean back? Will performance drop? And how will people be paid?
David Hain's insight:

New methods of performance management are emerging - are you watching. Many wasted hours and much cynicism to be saved!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, July 4, 7:05 PM
Some very good insights here although as I've been advocating for a very long performance management is dead and has be replaced with performance leadership
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The former CEO of a $120 billion company says Wall Street makes too much money, and it's causing a huge problem

The former CEO of a $120 billion company says Wall Street makes too much money, and it's causing a huge problem | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Chief executives are under pressure to produce returns for shareholders — often at any cost.
Activist investors, who now manage some $174 billion in assets, have exploded onto the scene, shaking up boards and pushing for share repurchases, company breakups, or outright sales in order to get stock prices higher.

But the trade-off of this focus on shareholder value is spending that benefits other stakeholders, like employees and customers, said Bill George, the former CEO of medical-device company Medtronic.

Value has to be created for your customers and, in turn, your employees, George said in an interview with Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal.

"If you do that," he says, "you'll have great value for your shareholders too."

George, a Senior Fellow at Harvard Business School, blames the swing to put shareholders before anyone else on the distortion of money in the financial-services industry.

David Hain's insight:

Bill George - who should know - challenges the religion of shareholder vale maximisation! Yay!

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Companies As Activists: Brands Take A Stand For Justice

Companies As Activists: Brands Take A Stand For Justice | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Most brands claim to have some form of social mission, but few act on it. Today’s winning brands are not only starting contentious, uncomfortable and socially-relevant conversations about the issues that matter, but they’re also getting off their buns and actually doing something about them.

Huge corporate giants that value profit over the environment and human lives are a thing of the past. These businesses have no place in the economy of the future. In fact, 73 percent of millennials believe that businesses should not only take a stand about important issues, but also influence others to get involved in those issues.

We want the companies we love to not only give a crap about the world, but also to advocate for us and take a stand on the issues that matter the most. It’s good for the planet and the people on it, and it’s super good for profits. To be competitive in the market of tomorrow, you have to be a company that cares.
David Hain's insight:

Becoming a company that cares. Really cares...! Practical examples of brands that get it!

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