Organisation Deve...
Follow
Find
20.5K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by David Hain from Designing services
onto Organisation Development
Scoop.it!

McKinsey: 30% have a Chief Digital Officer on their executive team - CDO Club

McKinsey: 30% have a Chief Digital Officer on their executive team - CDO Club | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
McKinsey: "Respondents whose organizations have a CDO also indicate significantly more progress toward their digital vision than those without one." (@McKinsey: 30% report a Chief Digital Officer on their executive teams.

Via Jay Deragon, Fred Zimny
more...
No comment yet.
Organisation Development
Developing healthy organisations
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Assessing Corporate Culture | MetaOps Magezine

Assessing Corporate Culture | MetaOps Magezine | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Corporate culture is a pretty nebulous thing. Is it the company mission, values and policies and procedures? Is it the leadership styles of top or middle management? Is it the values of the predominant age group that sets the tone? No matter how it is defined, most studies imply that corporate culture has a powerful effect on a company’s success.

The 2013 Culture and Change Management Survey (Price Waterhouse Coopers) of over 2,200 global business leaders found that:

84% believe culture is critical to business success;
60% believe culture is more important than business strategy or operating model; and yet
51% think a major overhaul is currently needed in their culture.
So, it begs the question: if leadership believes corporate culture is so important, why do over half respondents feel their corporate cultures need a major overhaul?
David Hain's insight:

Have you surveyed your culture recently?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Who is your company's Chief Decision Officer? - YouTube

Per a recent PWC report, “Big decisions have big impact on future profitability, with nearly 1 in 3 executives valuing those decisions at least at $1 billion”. Today’s organizations are dealing with complex situations that change “in flight”, technical silos, intellectual property locked in the minds of few, the need to understand how changes will impact future outcomes, and the need for systematic methods for decision making, risk assessment, and measurement. Although organizations are increasingly more focused on leveraging data, what is often missing is the individual who can use decision intelligence to assist the organization to drive Big Decisions.

Via an esteemed panel of technology, industry and talent experts “Who is Your Company’s Chief Decision Officer” will discuss 1) What is Decision Intelligence and how can it drive Big Decisions, and 2) Who should lead the charge for Decision intelligence in your organization and does this role currently exist?
David Hain's insight:

So, who is your organisation's Chief Decision Officer? Needs decision intelligence...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Taking the controls in remote-working | theHRDIRECTOR

Taking the controls in remote-working | theHRDIRECTOR | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
In mobile working, the overall aim is to build a culture of personal responsibility.  Some roles will inherently generate more cost than others and be more difficult to do when working remotely. Managers must be able to set benchmarks so every individual can see their own costs against KPI’s and targets. For the remote workers, they need to know and appreciate they are more closely scrutinised than their office based colleagues. To encourage personal responsibility, managers can give every employee a central view of their activity, the devices assigned to them and a total cost of everything they use, so they understand their impact on and the value they deliver back to the business.  This helps the team to take more care since they know their actions will be counted.
David Hain's insight:

Top tips to make remote working work!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

6 Surprising Insights Of Successful Employee Engagement

6 Surprising Insights Of Successful Employee Engagement | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Finally, leaders are now convinced one of their last remaining competitive advantages lies with their people. Businesses have begun to signal to workers that their needs will now be honored on a scale only previously reserved for customers and shareholders.

Raising employee engagement has become one of the highest priorities for organizations all around the globe, according to a 2015 Conference Board CEO study.

While leaders have come to appreciate the importance of having a fully engaged workforce, they also have a very limited understanding of what practices truly drive and sustain it.

Researchers from Deloitte Consulting, Sirota, and the Conference Board combined efforts in October 2014, and performed a deep dive into 12 companies consistently recognized for having high-performing, employee-centric cultures. The end product of their study defined the common-denominator characteristics, or the DNA, of highly engaged organizations.
David Hain's insight:

"The culture you create or the culture you destroy will determine the success of your business." ~ Rebecca Rae, HT @MaaHoda

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Job diversity: are you doing enough to open all doors?

Job diversity: are you doing enough to open all doors? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
News that the BBC is specifically seeking a weather presenter with a disability in an effort to improve on screen diversity has been met with surprise in some areas of the media. However, when you consider the extent to which disabled people are underrepresented in the workplace, hirers should be forgiven for thinking outside the box when it comes to bringing on board disabled talent.   
According to a recent Labour Force Survey, 46% of working age disabled people are in employment compared to 76% of working age non-disabled people – amounting to a gap of around two million. And the BBC’s approach, although somewhat extreme, is representative of a shifting tide in awareness towards this gap in representation.     
Research commissioned by the Recruitment Industry Disability Initiative (RIDI) has found that up to 80% of recruitment consultants believe that their organisation ‘could do more’ to increase the inclusion of disabled people. What’s more, almost three quarters (74%) of respondents recognise disabled candidates as an untapped talent pool. But where do we begin? 
David Hain's insight:

How are you doing in terms of recruiting disabled people?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

3 Approaches to Culture Change: What Works - Jesse Lyn Stoner

3 Approaches to Culture Change: What Works - Jesse Lyn Stoner | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
You can’t “do” culture change to your organization. Culture arises from the beliefs and underlying assumptions held by the people in the organization. Trying to change culture by decree or through training programs won’t affect people’s beliefs.

One way to change the culture is to fire a lot of people. That really shakes things up and gets change going – especially if you replace them with new people who come in with a different attitude about the company and the work.

If that doesn’t appeal to you, the only way to quickly and effectively change the culture is to involve the people you want to change in designing and implementing the change effort.
David Hain's insight:

Vertical, horizontal, diagonal slice approaches to changing culture.  Nice frame from @JesseLynStoner

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The 5 Types Of Organizational Structures: Part 2, 'Flatter' Organizations

The 5 Types Of Organizational Structures: Part 2, 'Flatter' Organizations | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Unlike the traditional hierarchy which typically sees one way communication and everyone at the top with all the information and power; a “flatter” structure seeks to open up the lines of communication and collaboration while removing layers within the organization. As you can see there are fewer layers and that arrows point both ways. Obviously an very simplified way to look at this type of a company but hopefully it gets the point across. For larger organizations this is the most practical, scalable, and logical approach to deploy across an entire company. This is the model that most large (and many mid-size) organizations around the world are moving towards.

It’s true, some form of hierarchy still does exist within this model but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing in this case. In flatter companies there is still a strong focus on communication and collaboration, improving the employee experience, challenging the status quo around traditional management models, and the like. But instead of completely reinventing the entire company and introducing a radical new structure and approach to work, it achieves similar results in far shorter term and with much less effort and resource allocation.
David Hain's insight:

'Flatter-ing' to deceive, or a very useful variant of hierarchies?  Jacob Morgan's take.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The 5 Types Of Organizational Structures: Part 4, Flatarchies

The 5 Types Of Organizational Structures: Part 4, Flatarchies | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Somewhere in between hierarchies and flat organizations lie flatarchies. These types of companies are a little bit of both structures. They can be more hierarchical and then have ad-hoc teams for flat structures or they can have flat structures and form ad-hoc teams that are more structured in nature. Organizations with this type of structure are very dynamic in nature and can be thought of a bit more like an amoeba without a constant structure.
David Hain's insight:

What are flatarchies and should you consider them? Jacob Morgan offers food for thought.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Getting organizational redesign right | McKinsey & Company

Getting organizational redesign right | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Organizational redesign involves the integration of structure, processes, and people to support the implementation of strategy and therefore goes beyond the traditional tinkering with “lines and boxes.” Today, it comprises the processes that people follow, the management of individual performance, the recruitment of talent, and the development of employees’ skills. When the organizational redesign of a company matches its strategic intentions, everyone will be primed to execute and deliver them. The company’s structure, processes, and people will all support the most important outcomes and channel the organization’s efforts into achieving them.


Recent McKinsey research surveying a large set of global executives suggests that many companies, these days, are in a nearly permanent state of organizational flux. Almost 60 percent of the respondents, for example, told us they had experienced a redesign within the past two years, and an additional 25 percent said they experienced a redesign three or more years ago. A generation or two back, most executives might have experienced some sort of organizational upheaval just a few times over the course of their careers.

David Hain's insight:

Good organisation design is much more than rearranging the structure chart.  It starts with the heartbeat...

more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, July 15, 6:31 PM

I like go beyond lines and boxes

The key is defining roles without people in mind, the relationships the role has and the value that must be deliver to each person, and then matching people to roles

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Strengthening Your Cultural Fortress

Strengthening Your Cultural Fortress | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
I’ve often wondered what goes into creating a company that people are happy to work for — a company that lands, for example, at the top of a Forbes list of best places to work. To gain some insight, I scheduled an interview with Paul Giobbi, the co-founder and CEO of Zumasys, a company that provides cloud-based infrastructure services. Giobbi’s company has appeared on Inc. magazine’s list of America’s fastest-growing companies six times, and has recently been named one of the best places to work by the Orange County Register, the Orange County Business Journal, and Computerworld. Impressive recognition, especially considering that the company had been struggling with an average of 16 percent employee turnover per year only five years ago.
David Hain's insight:

"Organizations that truly value people often don’t use it as an advertising slogan. They just do it." ` Ann Rhoades, HT Susan Cramm

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Customer-focused talent at Virgin Trains

Customer-focused talent at Virgin Trains | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
As part of the company’s move away from a traditional customer service approach, Virgin Trains’ Gaynor Stewart and Amanda Hines describe how its brand values have been refreshed to help develop the ‘customer experience’ – and increase employee engagement at the same time.
David Hain's insight:

How Virgin Trains do talent management

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Toward a new HR philosophy - Helping managers to manage!

Toward a new HR philosophy - Helping managers to manage! | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
I joined the online travel agency Agoda.com three years ago to lead the HR function. Mindful both of problematic patterns in other organizations and of a CEO deeply averse to traditional HR, I have tried to build a different model. My department’s fundamental goal is to help managers manage better, not to manage on their behalf. While we have a long way to go—Agoda is still in many ways in start-up mode, despite having over 2,000 employees in 28 countries—we’ve made significant progress.

I believe that sharing our experience may prove useful for other organizations as well. Our approach is based on a few core principles:

Managers, not HR, should define, live, and develop the company’s leadership.
Managers, not HR, should do the hard work of managing people—hiring, evaluating, rewarding, and disciplining employees—and managers should be evaluated on their results.
Employees, not HR, should “manage up” and take responsibility for solving problems directly with their managers.
In addition, we’ve taken the symbolic but important step of renaming our department People and Organization Development rather than Human Resources. We’ve also tried to hire the smartest and most talented people we can find, regardless of whether they have traditional HR backgrounds. Results so far have been promising.
David Hain's insight:

Unless HR changes itself, expecting managers to change their attitude is futile. Nice case study here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Listen to Employees When Evaluating Leadership - Not Just Earnings

Listen to Employees When Evaluating Leadership - Not Just Earnings | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Looking at employee dissatisfaction scores implies some companies may have unsustainable valuations
David Hain's insight:

For a sustainable future, look beyond the money.  What are your employees saying and how's the trend?

more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, July 2, 5:08 AM

inline with what I once wrote on Flourish Mentoring blog- that disgruntled employees are a barometer and indicator of impending doom and gloom:-)

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

LV= bringing the brand to life through people

LV= bringing the brand to life through people | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
When I ask Kevin Hough how many people make up the recruitment team at insurance company LV=, his answer is simple: 6,000.
As group head of resourcing, Hough is clear that every single one of LV=’s employees is a brand advocate and it is this mindset that he is keen to promote within the business. “The whole of LV= should be advocates and assist with our talent acquisition,” he says. “That’s what we want to leverage.”
Since the company transformed itself from Liverpool Victoria to LV=, Hough and his team have been working tirelessly to ensure the employer brand is aligned to the consumer brand; together with highlighting that LV= isn’t a “run of the mill” financial services organisation. This has been achieved with a consistent set of messages, with ‘real’ LV= people as the face of the brand, and making sure that the employer brand story lives up to reality. “It’s sometimes tough to get people to understand why an employer brand is so critical,” admits Hough. “But it underpins everything that we do and is just as essential as a product brand.”
David Hain's insight:

How LV strengthened their employer brand.  Informative case study #engagement #branding

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Two Types of High-Potential Talent

The Two Types of High-Potential Talent | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
What is a high-potential employee? Most companies have a clear picture of the characteristics that indicate a top performer: intelligence, charisma, verbal skill, and the ability to be both part of a team and lead one. These skills definitely fit the criteria, but too many leaders stop there. They tend to see and promote only one kind of high-potential talent, when in fact they need two.
David Hain's insight:

'Every truly successful business needs both high-potential producers and high-potential performers.' ~ Strategy&Business

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Flourish Mentoring
Scoop.it!

Why Happy Employees Are 12% More Productive

Why Happy Employees Are 12% More Productive | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
New research suggests we work more effectively, creatively, and collaboratively when we're happy at work.

Via Sandeep Gautam
David Hain's insight:

Empirical evidence for treating people like human beings to develop performance!

more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, July 23, 4:28 AM

more creative, more collaborative, more engaged: what else do you want?!?

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

What Horses Can Teach Us About Leadership

What Horses Can Teach Us About Leadership | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
If there is one thing that life on the range has taught me, it’s that if you have an effective leader, you stand a much better chance of surviving through times of change. Nature understands this. I can’t think of a single creature that doesn’t adhere to this principle when the going gets tough. Yet, when companies like Zappos move to holacratic and flat organizational structures, it can seem as if businesses today think they know better than Mother Nature. But, I’m not sure I agree.
David Hain's insight:

An equine contribution to the leadership culture debate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Stop helping and start listening | Aspire-CS

Stop helping and start listening | Aspire-CS | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
As I walked into the leader’s office, I noticed that something was off. He seemed upset. This man was a phenomenal leader; normally upbeat, beloved, respected, professional and smart. He was almost always calm and composed – but not today.

As I listened, a story unfolded of a situation that he handled (as he always did) with dignity and great integrity. But others who had supported him in the past betrayed him on his current efforts. He said he was angry and confused. I asked him what he would like to achieve in our time together. He rolled right past the question and continued with his story, a message to me that I may have missed.

My great urge now was to help him. Soothing words of comfort came to my lips, begging to be released. A wave of thoughts on the advice I could give him that might help ease his discomfort swirled about in my brain.

I recognized my usual pattern of wanting to fix what seemed broken, took a deep breath and just listened. I know that sometimes, just listening is the right thing to do but I don’t always do it. This time I did.

Did I provide value for him? Yes indeed. At the end of the hour, I asked if he got what he needed, and heard a resounding “Yes, I just needed you to listen”. I wasn’t a perfect listener but I caught myself and self-corrected to do what he needed in those moments.
David Hain's insight:

This advice from @mjasmus particularly appealed to my male 'fix it' tendencies!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The 5 Types Of Organizational Structures: Part 3, Flat Organizations

The 5 Types Of Organizational Structures: Part 3, Flat Organizations | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Unlike any other corporate structure that exists, flat companies are exactly that…flat. Meaning there are usually no job titles, seniority, managers, or executives. Everyone is seen as equal. Flat organizations are also oftentimes called or referred to as self-managed organizations (there can be some differences but for our case we will put them together). The most famous example of this comes from Valve, the gaming company responsible for classics such as Half-Life, Counter-Strike, Portal, and many others. At Valve there are no job titles and nobody tells you what to work on. Instead all the employees at Valve can see what projects are being worked on and can join whichever project they want. If an employee wants to start their own project then they are responsible for securing funding and building their team. For some this sounds like a dream for others, their worst nightmare.

There’s quite a lot that can be said about this type of structure. While it does have benefits and is interesting to consider I don’t see this as something that is practical or scalable for larger organizations when we think about the future of work. Smaller and some medium size companies might be able to operate in this type of an environment but when you get to organizations with thousands of employees then it becomes challenging.
David Hain's insight:

According to Jacob Morgan, flat structures mainly fall flat!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The 5 Types Of Organizational Structures: Part 1, The Hierarchy

The 5 Types Of Organizational Structures: Part 1, The Hierarchy | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
I’ve talked about several workplace practices and approaches that are quite out-dated and the hierarchy is one of them. According to Wikipedia, “possibly the first use of the English word “hierarchy” cited by the Oxford English Dictionary was in 1880, when it was used in reference to the three orders of three angels as depicted by Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite (5th–6th centuries).” This model was quickly adopted by the military as a way to show a chain of command and of course we have all seen and experienced this within our organizations (and most still do).

This type of a model makes sense for linear work where no brain power is required and where the people who work there are treated like expendable cogs. However, as the war for talent continues to become more fierce, organizations around the world are quickly trying to figure out alternatives to the hierarchy. In fact, every single organization I speak with, work with, and research, is looking to flatten out their structure. Nobody ever tells me they want more bureaucracy and more layers.
David Hain's insight:

Why hierarchy is so 20th century - Jacob Morgan.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Talent Analytics & The Future of Work
Scoop.it!

HR is ‘new frontier’ for data science applications, CEO survey finds

HR is ‘new frontier’ for data science applications, CEO survey finds | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
In a complex post-recession job market with a growing talent gap, top executives are relying more on recruitment and HR leaders for innovative business strategies grounded in data, according to a new CareerBuilder survey of US CEOs.

Via David Green
David Hain's insight:

The talent gap - are recruiters the people to fill it?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why Leadership Development Programs Fail: Weak Foundations

Why Leadership Development Programs Fail: Weak Foundations | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
McKinsey made an argument for why leadership development programs fail. At Kotter International, we recognize the difficulty in successfully implementing these programs, but we also believe they can be a key component to helping you and your organization thrive in an increasingly complex world. Part 1 of this series highlighted the importance of setting and communicating realistic expectations around leadership development programs. Part 2 of this series explores the critical role of solid, empirical research as the basis for the development of these programs.
David Hain's insight:

The importance, says Kotter, of empirical research in leadership development.

more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, July 14, 8:19 AM

Apply the 70:20:10 rule in letter and spirit!

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Future of Management Is Teal

The Future of Management  Is Teal | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Many people sense that the way organizations are run today has been stretched to its limits. In survey after survey, businesspeople make it clear that in their view, companies are places of dread and drudgery, not passion or purpose. Organizational disillusionment afflicts government agencies, nonprofits, schools, and hospitals just as much. Further, it applies not just to the powerless at the bottom of the hierarchy. Behind a facade of success, many top leaders are tired of the power games and infighting; despite their desperately overloaded schedules, they feel a vague sense of emptiness. All of us yearn for better ways to work together — for more soulful workplaces where our talents are nurtured and our deepest aspirations are honored.

The premise of this article is that humanity is at a threshold; a new form of organization is emerging into public view. Anthropological research suggests that this is a natural next step in a process that began more than 100,000 years ago. There have been, according to this view, at least five distinct organizational paradigms in human history. Could the current organizational disillusionment be a sign that civilization is outgrowing the current model and getting ready for the next?
David Hain's insight:

The elution of management paradigms - plus the next one? Fine work form Fred Laloux!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Is ‘holacracy’ the future for HR management? Exclusive interview with Zappos

Is ‘holacracy’ the future for HR management? Exclusive interview with Zappos | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
“HR isn’t just about holding people to rules, it’s a lot more than that. It’s about making sure your people are represented in the company’s decisions and live up to their potential. It’s about being part of something bigger and providing a great place to work rather than simply protecting the business.”
David Hain's insight:

The focus with Zappos is always holacracy, but the ethos is about getting to know each other better. The echo is more important!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

27 Ideas on Building a Business People Love

27 Ideas on Building a Business People Love | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
When it comes to content on the web, most of us forget far more than we remember.

Sorting through bookmarks often resembles finding a paperclip in a city landfill. It’s just plain tough to keep track of it all.

This year, the Help Scout blog ramped up our editorial calendar to two original posts per week; that’s 50+ articles published in the last six months. Quite a lot of writing to discover.

With that in mind, we’ve curated an abridged list of our greatest hits this year. The result? You can browse and revisit any posts you may have missed. Enjoy!
David Hain's insight:

Help Scouts greatest hits 2015. Brilliant content freely available form a consistently excellent source!

more...
No comment yet.