Organisation Development
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The 'Soft Skill' That Pays $100,000+ - empathy will emerge as a "must-have" job skill by 2020

The 'Soft Skill' That Pays $100,000+ -  empathy will emerge as a "must-have" job skill by 2020 | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

If you're an empathetic person -- good at connecting with other people's feelings -- can that help you win prestigious jobs that pay $100,000 a year or more? Or will you be stuck at the low end of the pay scale, doing a lot to promote rapport and smooth out problems in your field, but never earning a big salary for your trouble?

 

Earlier in June I wrote a piece for LinkedIn Influencers, arguing that empathy will emerge as a "must-have" job skill by 2020. The article attracted more than 890,000 readers, and lots of kind words. (Wow! -- and thanks.) In that piece, I cited lots of fast-growing, middle-tier careers where empathy matters, such as sports coaching, nursing and financial planning. But I didn't look at the empathy's relevance or irrelevance at the high end of the job market.

 

George A.


Via Edwin Rutsch
David Hain's insight:

Empathy will be relevant at every level

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Organisation Development
Developing healthy organisations
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How social tools can reshape the organization | McKinsey & Company

How social tools can reshape the organization | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Not all social technologies bring equal benefits. In a new survey, respondents say the most valuable tools make it easier for employees to collaborate—and could even transform the way organizations work.
David Hain's insight:

OD tools that are digital, cloud based and real-time offer new possibilities for developing org culture.

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How modern power works: less Game of Thrones, more Black Lives Matter

How modern power works: less Game of Thrones, more Black Lives Matter | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Keltner quotes Lord Acton, who he trusts more than Machiavelli: “Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” The results, he writes, are not pretty. “People who enjoy elevated power are more likely to eat impulsively and have sexual affairs, to violate the rules of the road, to lie and cheat, to shoplift, to take candy from children and to communicate in rude, profane and disrespectful ways … We gain and maintain power through empathy but, in our experience of power, we lose our focus on others.”

Is this corruption inevitable? Keltner thinks not, if only we are more alive to the risks.
David Hain's insight:

On the changing nature of power - how you get it and what you do when you have it. Interesting...

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Teaching Smart People How to Learn

Teaching Smart People How to Learn | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Any company that aspires to succeed in the tougher business environment of the 1990s must first resolve a basic dilemma: success in the marketplace increasingly depends on learning, yet most people don’t know how to learn. What’s more, those members of the organization that many assume to be the best at learning are, in fact, not very good at it. I am talking about the well-educated, high-powered, high-commitment professionals who occupy key leadership positions in the modern corporation.

Most companies not only have tremendous difficulty addressing this learning dilemma; they aren’t even aware that it exists. The reason: they misunderstand what learning is and how to bring it about. As a result, they tend to make two mistakes in their efforts to become a learning organization.
David Hain's insight:

Double loop learning - seminal work on how to grow individually or as an entity! Rate and quality of learning critical to comp advantage!

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Why you need to listen to your 360 feedback - a window on your awareness

Why you need to listen to your 360 feedback - a window on your awareness | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
"Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, when you do not see the plank in your own?"

This famous phrase from the Gospel of Luke captures a basic truth: what we see in others, we cannot or do not want to see in ourselves.

We all have blind spots, and we all need to improve our self-awareness. I still remember an innocent joke played on me when I was in first grade. As is traditional on April 1st, someone stuck a little paper fish to my back: all my classmates saw it and laughed, except me. It sounds like such a trivial thing, but the feeling that you are unaware of what others are thinking, that they know something about you that you do not, is powerful and destabilizing. A lack of awareness makes us insecure.
David Hain's insight:

If workplaces are essentially human endeavours, relationships are critical. So everyone should study the Johari Window and act on it!

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David Hain's curator insight, May 20, 4:00 AM

How to grow - share feedback, expose yourself, wait for reciprocation --> new perspectives!

Yvan's curator insight, May 21, 12:03 AM
So right
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10 Principles of Organizational Culture

10 Principles of Organizational Culture | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
You may be asking: If it is so hard to change culture, why should we even bother to try? Because an organization’s current culture contains several reservoirs of emotional energy and influence. Executives who work with them can greatly accelerate strategic and operating imperatives. When positive culture forces and strategic priorities are in sync, companies can draw energy from the way people feel. This accelerates a company’s movement to gain competitive advantage, or regain advantages that have been lost.
David Hain's insight:

Pulling on these culture levers will pay off!

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The Future of Work and Learning 2: Chatbots

The Future of Work and Learning 2: Chatbots | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
In my previous post I looked at how I believe Professional Ecosystems are the future of work and learning, and how organisations (and L&D) might support them.  In this post I want to look at how individuals might make use of chatbots to build smart Professional Ecosystems, and how organisations might use them to provide intelligent access to their own content and services as well as offer personalised support to individuals.
David Hain's insight:

How to use popular messaging system to create personalised bots for learning - scary but exciting!

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How HR will be Disrupted

How HR will be Disrupted | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
With the rise of machine learning and the on-demand economy making headway into HR and recruitment, the era of job agencies, headhunters and human bias in finding talent where there is a technical and
David Hain's insight:

AI and SAAS will mean that HR may never be the same again. Are you prepared?

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The Hard Science Behind Soft Skills

The Hard Science Behind Soft Skills | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Corporations spend billions of dollars each year to develop capable leaders. Some of this investment is directed toward business and functional skills training, but a great majority is spent developing soft skills such as influencing, coaching, listening, feedback and delegating.

Despite the large size of this investment, however, little attention is paid to the impact soft skills development actually has on producing better leaders. Talent analytics are slowly creeping into the human resources community, enabling chief learning officers and their colleagues to answer key questions, determine what works and what doesn’t, and improve talent practices including leadership soft skills development.

Applying talent analytics to the bigger picture of leadership development, Development Dimensions International has conducted research that reveals larger trends and implications for organizations and their leaders (Editor’s note: The authors work at DDI). What follows are four findings from an array of DDI studies published between 2014 and 2016.
David Hain's insight:

Studies now showing that the soft stuff really is the hard stuff - and like most hard things, investment pays off!

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Create Mentorships, Not Minions

Create Mentorships, Not Minions | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Today, the traditional paradigm in which a charismatic executive leads an adoring, less-senior employee where power is often misaligned won’t do, explained executive coaching expert Wendy Mantel of Mantel Coaching Inc. Millennials want close, meaningful relationships with mentors. They also want to feel empowered to be authentic, to create and embody their own career brands.

“Engagement, learning, growth, visibility, relevance and opportunity are watchwords for this generation,” Mantel said in an email. These needs are also important guiding words for learning organizations developing new, or rethinking, established, mentoring approaches.
David Hain's insight:

Everybody needs a mentor - but not just any old mentor, or possibly the usual suspects!

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John Ludike's curator insight, May 11, 1:50 AM
Accurate  pragmatic summary which is very relevant to modern day Mentorship efgorts
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, May 13, 2:17 AM
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Thorlo: A case study of Positive Leadership & Culture | Leadership & Change Magazine

Thorlo: A case study of Positive Leadership & Culture | Leadership & Change Magazine | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Jim Ritchie-Dunham coined the term Ecosynomics. Ecosynomics provides a theoretical framework that shows the often hidden, underlying agreements that affect human collaboration, and how to change these fundamental assumptions.

Energetic, high-performance teams start from a different initial assumption than economic scarcity. They start with abundance. Ecosynomics, the social science of abundance, explains how that changes all the rules of the game. Let’s take a look at an inspiring case study based on Ecosynomics, abundance and positive leadership: Thorlo.
David Hain's insight:

I'd never heard of ecosynomics either! But it's interesting, particularly if you care about OD!

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You Wouldn't Starve a House Plant: Don't Neglect a Growing Organization

You Wouldn't Starve a House Plant: Don't Neglect a Growing Organization | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We don't often view organizations as living, breathing organisms. However, if you desire to build an organization that survives the test of time, considering this perspective is vital. Inevitably, we become engrossed with the buzzing demands of our work — and the bones of the organization itself can wear thin. For start-up organizations building awareness can be preemptive. For more established organizations, a required pause to offer needed "nourishment" may be in order.

A number of potentially debilitating issues can be cushioned — and in many cases entirely avoided, if addressed early on.
David Hain's insight:

Insightful piece on organisations as organic, dynamic entities!

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How Corporations Become Evil

How Corporations Become Evil | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
The sociologist Diane Vaughan coined the phrase the normalization of deviance to describe a cultural drift in which circumstances classified as “not okay” are slowly reclassified as “okay.” In the case of the Challenger space-shuttle disaster—the subject of a landmark study by Vaughan—damage to the crucial O‑rings had been observed after previous shuttle launches. Each observed instance of damage, she found, was followed by a sequence “in which the technical deviation of the [O‑rings] from performance predictions was redefined as an acceptable risk.” Repeated over time, this behavior became routinized into what organizational psychologists call a “script.” Engineers and managers “developed a definition of the situation that allowed them to carry on as if nothing was wrong.” To clarify: They were not merely acting as if nothing was wrong. They believed it, bringing to mind Orwell’s concept of doublethink, the method by which a bureaucracy conceals evil not only from the public but from itself.
David Hain's insight:

Great article on the VW scandal and 'the normalisation of deviance", a really useful OD concept! HT @ReachScale!

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Compassion: Wisdom in Action and Association

Compassion: Wisdom in Action and Association | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
“During his presidency [Mandela] not only actively disengaged himself from his old egoic self but worked compassionately to reintegrate relationships into positive engagement.”
David Hain's insight:

The alchemy of compassion! Includes excellent TED Talk by @nadinehack, beautifully elaborated by Surendra Soni!

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Nadine Hack's curator insight, April 5, 11:55 AM
Thanks to David Hain for scooping this first!  This is a great piece on beCause blog by Dr Surendra Soni.  
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Are Good Corporate Citizens Rewarded?

Are Good Corporate Citizens Rewarded? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Bottom Line: Large U.S. firms with a sustainability program see an uptick in financial performance and have a positive impact on the environment around them.
David Hain's insight:

Seems like CSR is having some effect - sustainability programmes pay off in financial returns and environmental impact.

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A New Way Of Conducting Business: The Benefit Corporation

A New Way Of Conducting Business: The Benefit Corporation | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
In January 2014, Adi Ignatius, the editor of Harvard Business Review, wrote: The world would be a better place if businesses stopped thinking so much about short-term results and focused more on the long term. “Yet it has proved nearly impossible to shift their behavior. The idea is clear, but the incentive systems in place at many firms deter efforts to attain it.
This problem was answered by Roger Martin, Academic Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute: in an illuminating discussion at the Aspen Institute (now on Youtube).  His response was clear: short-termism is not the real problem.

Martin was asked, “You’re not saying that you can’t serve your shareholders; that it’s just by not pursuing shareholder value in the short term?” Martin responded: "I’d say it’s by not pursuing shareholder value at all. The best way to serve shareholders is to have a great company.
David Hain's insight:

A new way to revolutionise the shareholder value stranglehold of short-termism? Interesting concept from @StandardofTrust.

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Nasdaq CEO Bob Greifeld explains the strategy he uses to find the company's next leaders

Nasdaq CEO Bob Greifeld explains the strategy he uses to find the company's next leaders | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Nasdaq, Inc. CEO Bob Greifeld regularly has group lunches with non-executive employees to remain visible and available to those outside of his inner circle.
But through these lunches, Greifeld is able to get an idea of who will be rising up the ranks to a leadership position.
"It's always interesting to me to see the range of engagement of people," he told Business Insider in a recent interview held in Nasdaq's New York headquarters.
He'll find some employees who are "intellectually curious" and know what is happening within Nasdaq and the industry, and other employees who may be talented and capable but only know what's happening within their own job.
"If you don't have that intellectual curiosity, magnified by passion, then it's hard to advance, and, certainly at the executive level, hard to thrive," Greifeld said.
To help monitor the growth of natural leaders possessing this trait, Nasdaq ties 10% of its employees' compensation to an engagement score.
"Intellectual curiosity" is also the primary attribute Greifeld looks for when interviewing candidates for a role that reports directly to him.
"I think water seeks its level over time," he said. "As managers you might think you have the ability to change employees, but I say you have the ability to improve them but not to change them, because they will always go back to their own level." Therefore, he wants to find candidates whose innate curiosity and passion will drive them, without his intervention.
"You've got to assess who this person is, what their motivations are, at what rate do they want to work, and how do they want to advance," Greifeld said.
"We want to see people who want to be passionate, want to be engaged, want to be part of the industry, and are not just coming here to work to make what is a good paycheck."
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 'Shark Tank' star Daymond John reveals the advantages of being broke
Via Riaz Khan, Sushma Sharma
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What companies still don't understand about millennials

What companies still don't understand about millennials | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Working millennials ask a lot of their employers, but game rooms and rock walls are low on the list.

In fact, baby boomers more than millennials seek out jobs that are fun and encourage creativity, according toa new Gallup report that identifies what employers get right, and wrong, about millennials in the workforce.

What that rising generation seeks is actually pretty simple: Millennials — those Americans born between 1980 and 1996 — just want to know where they stand and where they're going.

"They want a workplace that helps them progress, but they also want to see their own value," said Jim Harter, chief scientist for workplace management and well-being for Gallup’s workplace management practice.
David Hain's insight:

Authoritative stuff - organisations still struggling to get Millennials, maybe doing the wrong things?

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Ian Berry's curator insight, May 20, 6:13 PM
Good snappy graphic illustrating some of the key differences between the past and the future about leadership
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Consultants: Recommending Consultations for 100+ Years | JSTOR Daily

Consultants: Recommending Consultations for 100+ Years | JSTOR Daily | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Glassdoor reports that three of the five highest paying companies in the country are consulting firms. To some of us, that might sound like some sort of a scam. Consulting is a weird profession, seemingly based on the idea that someone outside a company can determine its needs better than its own executives.

In a 2001 paper, Christopher D. McKenna traces the history of the management consulting industry, offering clues into what real value the firms provide.
David Hain's insight:

The role of consultants - a force for change or a cop-out form management? Big business, anyway...

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10 Principles of Organizational Culture

10 Principles of Organizational Culture | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

How often have you heard somebody — a new CEO, a journalist, a management consultant, a leadership guru, a fellow employee — talk about the urgent need to change the culture? They want to make it world-class. To dispense with all the nonsense and negativity that annoys employees and stops good intentions from growing into progress. To bring about an entirely different approach, starting immediately.

 

These culture critiques are as common as complaints about the weather — and about as effective. How frequently have you seen high-minded aspirations to “change the culture” actually manage to modify the way that people behave and the way in which they work? And how often have you seen noticeable long-term improvements?

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
David Hain's insight:

Most organisations want culture change quick fixes - but there are building blocks to develop first!

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Cameron Larsuel's curator insight, March 10, 1:13 PM

Companies can tap their natural advantage when they focus on changing a few important behaviors, enlist informal leaders, and harness the power of employees’ emotions.

 

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 10, 7:35 AM
Organizational culture is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about organizational architecture can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Ian Berry's curator insight, May 14, 9:04 PM
I like the emphasis on behaviour. Fits with the best definition of culture I know of from Michael Henderson "Culture is what it means to be human here"
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The secret to disagreeing with people from 20 different countries, in one chart

The secret to disagreeing with people from 20 different countries, in one chart | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

As a bumbling American (or any nationality, really) abroad, there is no end to the ways that you can offend people and embarrass yourself in the process.

President Carter succeeded in 1977, when he told the Polish people, through an unfortunate translation, that he desired them “carnally.” President Bush offended Australians in 1992, when he gave a “V-for-victory” sign, the equivalent to a middle finger down under. And Michelle Obama had her own moment when she half-hugged the Queen in 2009, one of the few incidences of public hugging in the Queen’s 57-year career.

Erin Meyer, a professor at the global business school INSEAD, has accumulated her own thoughts on how to navigate cross-cultural missteps in a new book, “The Culture Map.” One chart that appears in the book, reprinted here with her permission, is particularly great at decoding some of the perils in cross-cultural communication.

David Hain's insight:

If there is no excellence without conflict, then this chart will come in handy! How to understand your international colleagues (at the highest level, at least).

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Learning at the speed of business | McKinsey & Company

Learning at the speed of business | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
What digital means for the next generation of corporate academies.

Corporate universities are entering their second century, just as the businesses that rely on them are transforming themselves for the digital age. When pioneers such as General Motors and General Electric began offering standardized in-house training programs, about 100 years ago, they focused on imparting lower-level, day-to-day skills. Back then, it may have seemed fanciful to imagine the full-fledged academies that would emerge in later decades. But emerge they did: GE’s Crotonville leadership center, in 1956; McDonald’s Hamburger University, in 1961; and today’s true learning institutions for global corporations such as Apple, Boeing, and Danone.

Now a new phase is unfolding at these organizations, which must grapple with tools and platforms that facilitate knowledge sharing and employee interactions on an almost limitless scale, challenging—and sometimes appearing to sweep away—the old brick-and-mortar model (exhibit).
David Hain's insight:

One possible future for learning in organisations?

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The future of recruitment?

The future of recruitment? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
It’s been said that the recruitment and staffing sector has been badly let down – or certainly ignored – in terms of technological advancement. For an industry that has been around for a very long time (Hays has been recruiting professional candidates for clients since the late sixties) it has not seen the significant disruption that one might have expected, compared to sectors such as retail for example.
David Hain's insight:

Big changes on the way in an industry that hasn't really changed that much in a long time!

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AS WORK TRANSFORMS, LEADERSHIP STILL MATTERS

AS WORK TRANSFORMS, LEADERSHIP STILL MATTERS | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
It has certainly been interesting as of late, with leaders and the practice of leadership receiving more scrutiny than any other time in recent history. There seems to be no shortage of data pointing to the current “leadership crisis,” from surveys on confidence, trust, hope, and optimism, and the frequently discussed issue of employee engagement. With little to no improvement, the leadership conversation now includes theories and practices such as distributed leadership, holocracy management, and leaderless environments. And while the jury is still out on many of the new models, I strongly believe that as work transforms, leadership still matters.
David Hain's insight:

Regardless of the orhganisational model, leadership is still business critical and always will be!

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Is “Psychological Danger” killing your team’s performance?

Is “Psychological Danger” killing your team’s performance? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
In a business context, values such as diversity, trust and respect can often have people rolling their eyes and delivering sarcastic renditions of Kumbaya; and with all the jargon and pontificating who can blame them?

But let’s hold the sarcasm for a moment and consider this: Google is one of the most successful businesses in modern history. It attracts some of the most brilliant minds in the world and is pioneering some of the most important innovations of our time. And the number one thing underpinning the most successful teams at Google, as identified by Google itself, is something many senior executives have never heard of: “psychological safety”.
David Hain's insight:

How can you make it psychologivcally safe for people to disagree or live with a minority view?

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Harvard University puts spotlight on educating girls globally

Harvard University puts spotlight on educating girls globally | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We will do justice to the world by promoting girls' education as the single most powerful transformational force to improve lives and societies,' said UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova, addressing the Askwith Forum at Harvard's Graduate School of Education on March 31, 2016.
The Forum, organized as part of the 'University's Advanced Leadership Initiative, brought together faculty, students and fellows from foundations and the private sector, around the theme 'Against the Odds: Educating Girls Globally."
David Hain's insight:

Girls education - a moral, development and security imperative recongnised by Harvard and UNESCO. How could your organisation help?

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