Organisation Development
24.2K views | +2 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by David Hain from Changemaking
onto Organisation Development
Scoop.it!

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR SPOTLIGHT: A fireside chat with Bill Drayton

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR SPOTLIGHT: A fireside chat with Bill Drayton | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
The founder of the Ashoka movement reflects on 18th century business, social progress since the 1980s – and what his godmother thinks of his career.

Via The Ashoka Community
David Hain's insight:

A fantastic community - and a man well worth a listen...

more...
The Ashoka Community's curator insight, April 25, 2013 3:23 PM

A first-hand take on social entrepreneurship revealed through Bill Drayton's personal journey. Discover Drayton's insights on system change and more!

Organisation Development
Developing healthy organisations
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How Machine Learning, Big Data And AI Are Changing Healthcare Forever

How Machine Learning, Big Data And AI Are Changing Healthcare Forever | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
While robots and computers will probably never completely replace doctors and nurses, machine learning/deep learning and AI are transforming the healthcare industry, improving outcomes, and changing the way doctors think about providing care.

Machine learning is improving diagnostics, predicting outcomes, and just beginning to scratch the surface of personalized care.
David Hain's insight:

The future is already here, here are a number of mini-revolutions that you may not have heard of!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

What Amazon's New 30-Hour Workweek Pilot Means

What Amazon's New 30-Hour Workweek Pilot Means | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
There are some bosses who believe that happiness and ease make for better work. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is reportedly not among them.

According to a scathing New York Times exposé of Amazon's corporate culture last year, employees at the tech giant can regularly be found crying at their desks due to the stress and exhaustion of working at the company. But perhaps things at Amazon are about to change.

According to a report in The Washington Post (which, it should be noted, is owned by Bezos), the company has begun a small trial of 30-hour workweeks. A few dozen employees on select tech teams will work reduced hours for 75 percent of a full-time salary. Crucially, they will be given the same benefits as full-time employees.
David Hain's insight:

Amazon and the 30-hour week. Authentic improvement mechanism or cynical market exploitation?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Power (and Risks) of Measurement in a Fitbit World

The Power (and Risks) of Measurement in a Fitbit World | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Too often, organizations measure what’s easy to measure. But giving a three-dimensional picture of success from the angles of delight, profits, and growth is key for a complete understanding of business health and to keep people from rigging the scoreboard.

According to quality guru and scholar Edwards Deming, pure information is not knowledge. Knowledge comes from having a good theory that allows us to use information to predict results. After turning data into information, we must turn information into action in order to manage results. Fitbit-like dashboards can help, but without the benefits of triangulation and a clear notion of cause and effect, we have no more likelihood of managing sustainable outcomes than my friend will have at influencing her health by strapping her Fitbit wristband to her Labrador retriever.

In business, poorly conceived and simplistic dashboards that fail to tap into the essential drivers of success will give one-dimensional pictures that risk promoting short-term quarterly results over success derived from engaged teams collaborating to achieve meaningful and sustainable results.

Worse, poorly implemented, simplistic, or short-term-only dashboards can build fear, pit one group against another, and fuel internal politics. Employees could end up discouraged at having fallen short of standards or simply ignore the point and the power of measurement.
David Hain's insight:

What gets measured, gets gamed! Unless you are careful with the metrics and interrogative with the data!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Building a psychologically safe workplace: Amy Edmondson at TEDxHGSE

The Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at Harvard Business School is well known for her work on teams.
David Hain's insight:

How are you framing team issues? Opportunity for learning or blame? Big difference in short and long term results...!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

What is Your Organisation’s Purpose? - People Development Network

What is Your Organisation’s Purpose? - People Development Network | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
If you’re reading this as a commercial enterprise, purpose is not about ditching profit and suddenly getting all causal about things. It’s about putting purpose at the centre of your enterprise, putting it before profit and being purpose-led, because, ironically, companies connected to their purpose end up being 10 – 18 times more profitable than those companies who focus solely on profit itself. The two are inextricably interlinked. And it makes sense. Work is intensely personal. The more we as companies can tap into what our employees care about, the more inspired they will be at work, and the more inspired they are, the more they will contribute to the success of our company. If you add to this the possibilities of also connecting your other stakeholders to your purpose – selecting suppliers who resonate with your purpose, for example, and ensuring that the brand you put out into society reflects your purpose – then a powerful ripple effect is created that sustains itself and is far more effective than a leader trying to gee up the troops from the front.
David Hain's insight:

Are you benefitting from the power of purpose? It takes clarity and alignment, plus continuous attention!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Introducing the Systems View of Life Into Organizations | Sustainable Brands

Introducing the Systems View of Life Into Organizations | Sustainable Brands | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
One of the first obstacles in introducing systems thinking into organizations is the fact that universities, which are organized around single disciplines, are not currently able to prepare students in this approach, which is inherently multidisciplinary. As Fritjof remarked:

“A professor of biology often does not feel comfortable talking about climate change; or a professor of social studies about mind and consciousness. The systems view of life covers all these areas.”
To overcome these challenges Fritjof was inspired to create Capra Course, a new online course based on The Systems View of Life, which consists of twelve pre-recorded lectures, along with a discussion forum in which Fritjof participates throughout the course. As Fritjof explained:

“You see, the systems view of life is critical today for all professions, because the major problems of our time are systemic problems — all interconnected and interdependent — and they need corresponding systemic solutions. The systems view of life provides the conceptual framework for such systemic solutions.”
While we have come a long way in relation to helping major organisations develop a more systemic view of the problems we face, we still have some way to go.
David Hain's insight:

The Capra Course - teaching a systems view of life and organisations. Interdependent challenges need system solutions!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

What’s Your Story?

What’s Your Story? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Even the most artfully crafted story is worthless if is inauthentic, which is to say unrecognizable in the context of the company or person telling it (just ask any of current crop of US presidential candidates who have spent millions on advertising only to see their poll numbers fall through the floor). In our experience, the most powerful story of all—one that is compelling, authentic, and true—is rooted in one’s own experience. Smart organizations and their leaders know this. They act deliberately to capture what we call “heritage stories”— founding myths, remembered events, survival stories—and use them to help crystallize a sense of purpose, engage people in transformational change, and make them feel a part of something larger than themselves.
David Hain's insight:

A powerful argument that effective stories require depth, context and authenticity - when these are present, the results are compelling, as evidenced in the examples. Excellent and timely insight from  BeCause associate John Seaman and colleague Robert Ferguson.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Corporate Mindfulness Training Programs Seeing a Boost

Corporate Mindfulness Training Programs Seeing a Boost | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Increasingly, companies are jumping on the mindfulness training bandwagon.
David Hain's insight:

Corporate mindfulness programmes burgeoning - good. But mustn't become a cult...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future (Part 5)

5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future (Part 5) | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We are learning our way forward in developing leaders for the workplace of the future while they arelearning their way forward through complexity, economic challenges and catastrophic change. We will need to stay ahead of that curve to prepare them. 
David Hain's insight:

Useful series on leadership for tomorrow from the author of @7Lenses!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Connection Between Employee Trust and Financial Performance

The Connection Between Employee Trust and Financial Performance | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
A building surrounded by razor wire. A guard tower looming over the perimeter. Weeds and overgrowth flanking the grim exterior. Inside — drab colors, peeling paint, and dead plants decaying in the common areas. Was this a prison? No. This was the headquarters of Campbell Soup Company when one of us, Doug Conant, took the reins as CEO in 2001.

Was this a deliberate attempt to imprison employees and stifle their energy? No again. It was a vivid example of organizational leaders neglecting the importance of building trust.  Contrary to popular belief, cultivating a high-trust culture is not a “soft” skill — it’s a hard necessity. Put another way, it’s the foundational element of high-performing organizations.

Doug identified “Inspiring Trust” as his number one mission in his 10-year turnaround of Campbell Soup Company, where his efforts resulted in cumulative shareholder returns in the top tier of the global food industry, and among the highest measured employee engagement levels in the Fortune 500, particularly with his leadership team. While few leaders would argue against the idea that trust is necessary for building elite performance, not nearly enough realize the height of its importance and far too many disregard trust-building as a “soft” or “secondary” competency.
David Hain's insight:

If more evidence was needed (it isn't), a great case study on trust and the bottom line!

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 29, 5:12 AM
The Connection Between Employee Trust and Financial Performance
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

There’s an Alternative to Leadership Development

There’s an Alternative to Leadership Development | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Organizations worldwide have to develop their leaders with less time and money, and it’s not easy. Worse, most leadership development programs turn out to be ineffective and expensive. These programs provide little focus on the social, interpersonal and strategic aspects of leadership, and what’s learned is often difficult to apply. But there’s an alternative.

Action learning with a trained coach is a cost-effective approach that enables leaders to develop capabilities while working to solve urgent organizational or social problems. Essentially, leaders are learning while working, making it easy to see how learned skills apply on the job.

Details from “Action Learning and Leadership Development,” a research study on how action learning develops leaders were published in April. [Editor’s note: The author is one of the authors of the study.] The study reviewed nearly 150 papers from more than 30 countries, representing more than 200 action learning sessions. The review identified more than 100 instances where the skills practiced in the action learning session were transferred to the workplace.

Several key themes emerged:

David Hain's insight:

The many benefits of Action Learning. Saw this in action in 3  groups within the last week. Raise your cup to double loop learning!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why We’re Giving Our Employees a Raise

Why We’re Giving Our Employees a Raise | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We face many challenges. But they can be overcome by government, business and the nonprofit sectors working together to build on models of success that advance economic opportunity and create more widely shared prosperity.
David Hain's insight:

JP Morgan invests in employees and advocates collaboration. If I can silence my inner cynic, gotta be a good thing!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Shaking up the UK’s status quo

Shaking up the UK’s status quo | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Few know more about the reality of life behind the UK's closed government doors than Francis Maude. Here, he tells us about the lessons gleaned from overseeing a radical programme of government reforms that continue to reverberate to this day
David Hain's insight:

Francis Maude on the challenges of transforming the Government ecosystem - very interesting and relevant to ur future society!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

Why Workplace Leadership Is About To Get Its First Major Makeover In 100 Years

Why Workplace Leadership Is About To Get Its First Major Makeover In 100 Years | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
“ Workplace leadership is undergoing significant change. Here are three important reasons why leadership is about to be greatly transformed.”
Via Anne Leong, Vicki Moro, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, September 24, 9:47 PM
There's a lot of great insights in this yet I don't agree with the premise of leadership about to get it's first major makeover. Such transformation has been happening for 100 years. The great news is that today such change is becoming mainstream
Kevin T. Kjellerup's curator insight, Today, 8:34 AM
Share your insight
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Sink or Swim: Setting First-time Leaders Up for Success

Sink or Swim: Setting First-time Leaders Up for Success | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
What are you doing in your organization to help your new leaders rise to the challenge, find success, and blossom into the catalyst leaders you need them to be?

While you might be doing a lot, the best answer is always “not enough.” No leader is ever a finished product. And even when leaders become proficient, the environment in which they operate will more than likely change, creating a new set of expectations and critical skills to be developed.

New leaders need extra care, support and empathy. These things are what determine whether or not a new leader will unceremoniously sink or swimmingly succeed.
David Hain's insight:

Only 11% of leaders groomed for their role through development programmes! Shame...and shortsighted!

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, September 17, 3:10 AM
Sink or Swim: Setting First-time Leaders Up for Success
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Hidden Curriculum of Work

The Hidden Curriculum of Work | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
A hidden curriculum exists whenever there are two simultaneous challenges where one is visible, clear, and understood and the other is concealed, ambiguous, and undefined. Take, for example, the lives of professional athletes. They must master the fundamentals of their sport and excel at the highest level on the court or field, but they also have to learn how to navigate murkier waters like wealth, fame, and other distractions that can arise. Similarly, when children enter school, they have to master their academic curriculum but, reading, math, and science do not prepare them for peer pressure, social dynamics, and developmental challenges of youth.

In the same way, we all encounter a hidden curriculum of work, regardless of tenure, level, or role. Whether you acknowledge it or not, you’re navigating your own hidden curriculum.
David Hain's insight:

Talk about the hidden curriculum rather than the job description to help people understand their contribution!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Google Finds That Successful Teams Are About Norms Not Just Smarts

Google Finds That Successful Teams Are About Norms Not Just Smarts | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
It would make sense to start with some assumption that a team’s success is tied to its composition in some fixed way. For example, a ratio of engineers to non-engineers. Or senior leaders with junior followers. But when Google started to examine the variables it couldn’t find a connection.

‘‘We looked at 180 teams from all over the company,’’ Dubey said. ‘‘We had lots of data, but there was nothing showing that a mix of specific personality types or skills or backgrounds made any difference. The ‘who’ part of the equation didn’t seem to matter.’’
What did the research – called Project Aristotle – eventually discern? That team norms – how teams agree to behave and function – were more important determinants than purely team composition. So they dove into understanding what type of norms mattered most.
David Hain's insight:

Good team norms can raise collective intelligence - but poor one can diminish teams of geniuses!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How social entrepreneurs can solve the talent problem | McKinsey & Company

How social entrepreneurs can solve the talent problem | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
The impact of social entrepreneurs—individuals who deploy innovation and market forces to fill social needs—is growing. Bringing light to Africa, mobile banking to Bangladesh, low-cost healthcare to Nepal, or even better school lunches to the American cafeteria: in all these cases, the private sector is a big part of the action.

That social entrepreneurs can make a difference is not in question. But there is plenty of potential left to unlock. What do these enterprises need to scale up? And how can they do it?

RippleWorks, a private foundation that supports promising social entrepreneurs around the world by providing them with leading Silicon Valley executives as advisers, asked those questions in a recent survey of 628 social entrepreneurs from all over the world. The research, conducted with analytical support from McKinsey and with funding from the Omidyar Network, included interviews with 37 investors and 10 social-enterprise leaders.
David Hain's insight:

The talent challenge - critical for mature businesses. In the end, only people can take you further, sustainably!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Poorer than their parents? A new perspective on income inequality | McKinsey & Company

Poorer than their parents? A new perspective on income inequality | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

Most people growing up in advanced economies since World War II have been able to assume they will be better off than their parents. For much of the time, that assumption has proved correct: except for a brief hiatus in the 1970s, buoyant global economic and employment growth over the past 70 years saw all households experience rising incomes, both before and after taxes and transfers. As recently as between 1993 and 2005, all but 2 percent of households in 25 advanced economies saw real incomes rise.

Yet this overwhelmingly positive income trend has ended. A new McKinsey Global Institute report, Poorer than their parents? Flat or falling incomes in advanced economies, finds that between 2005 and 2014, real incomes in those same advanced economies were flat or fell for 65 to 70 percent of households, or more than 540 million people (exhibit). And while government transfers and lower tax rates mitigated some of the impact, up to a quarter of all households still saw disposable income stall or fall in that decade.

David Hain's insight:

This potentially corrosive issue won't go away without action!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong | McKinsey 

People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong | McKinsey  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Over the past decade, big data analytics has been revolutionizing the way many companies do business. Chief marketing officers track detailed shopping patterns and preferences to predict and inform consumer behavior. Chief financial officers use real-time, forward-looking, integrated analytics to better understand different business lines. And now, chief human-resources officers are starting to deploy predictive talent models that can more effectively—and more rapidly—identify, recruit, develop, and retain the right people. Mapping HR data helps organizations identify current pain points and prioritize future analytics investments (exhibit). Surprisingly, however, the data do not always point in the direction that more seasoned HR officers might expect. Here are three examples.
David Hain's insight:

Big data and HR analytics insight. Useful for OD decision making!

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 29, 5:09 AM
People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong | McKinsey
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Here's Why Viking Economics Are Superior

Here's Why Viking Economics Are Superior | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Sweden is not satisfied with its work/life balance and set up an experiment with the six-hour day in the city of Gothenburg. City workers will be divided randomly, with half continuing the eight-hour day and the other half engaging in the experiment. The goal is to gain higher productivity per hour and have fewer sick days. The researchers are encouraged by positive results from Toyota’s similar experiment in its Gothenburg factory.
David Hain's insight:

Will more leisure lead to higher productivity and less time off? Quite likely, according to this article...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why Nice Bosses Finish First

Overly tough bosses create stress, and lots of it, as the research shows: A University of London study found an especially strong link between heart disease and boss-inflicted stress, while a University of Concordia study found that employees who rate themselves as highly stressed added 46% to their employer’s health care costs. Research from the Institute of Naval Medicine found that overly tough bosses cause people to seek jobs elsewhere, to perform at a lower level, to decline promotions, and even to quit. Finally, a survey from Randstad Consulting showed that most employees would trade in their bosses for better ones rather than receive a $5,000 pay raise. People don’t leave jobs; they leave bad bosses.

The thing is, nice bosses don’t just prevent health and motivational problems among their employees; they create massive benefits that hard-nosed bosses can’t.
David Hain's insight:

If you're a boss, play nice to win. We'll, don't play, just bring out your best and others will follow...

more...
David Hain's curator insight, July 19, 5:18 AM

If you're a boss, play nice to win. We'll, don't play, just bring out your best and others will follow...

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 22, 12:48 AM
Great list of leadership characterisitics and love the John Maxwell quote too
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Hard Science of Teamwork

The Hard Science of Teamwork | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Like many people, I’ve encountered teams that are “clicking.” I’ve experienced the “buzz” of a group that’s blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others’ minds. We think of building teams that operate on this plane as an art, or even magic. It’s not something you can plan; it’s lightning-in-a-bottle stuff that you just embrace when you’re lucky enough to come across it.

But to me, the buzz was so palpable, I decided that it must be a real, observable and measurable thing. I was motivated to find a way to document that buzz, and understand good teamwork as a hard science.

The team I lead at MIT’s Human Dynamics Laboratory has done just that. Using wearable electronic sensors called sociometric badges, we capture how people communicate in real time, and not only can we determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but we can also describe those characteristics mathematically. What’s more, we’ve discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.

My feature article in HBR’s April Spotlight on teams describes in detail the new science of building great teams. We can summarize those points here.
David Hain's insight:

Looks like an interesting and illuminating series on the sociology of teams, previewed here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Poor at 20, Poor for Life

Poor at 20, Poor for Life | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Overall, the probability of someone starting and ending their career in the same decile has gone up for every income rank. “For whatever reason, there was a path upward in the earnings distribution that has been blocked for some people, or is not as steep as it used to be,” Carr said.

Carr and Wiemers’ findings highlight a defining aspect of being middle class today, says Elisabeth Jacobs, the senior director for policy and academic programs at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, the left-leaning think tank that published Carr and Wiemers’ paper. “If you’re in the middle, you’re stuck in the middle, which means there’s less space for others to move into the middle,” she said. “That suggests there’s just a whole bunch of insecurity going on in terms of what it means to be a worker. You can’t educate your way up.”
David Hain's insight:

This s depressing news, and likely, in part, for the rise of Trump and the vote for Brexit. Much todo!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Turn the Promise of Employee Advocacy Into Reality

Turn the Promise of Employee Advocacy Into Reality | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Here’s a question I hear a lot these days: “How can we get employees to start sharing brand content on social media?” 

Employee advocacy has finally bubbled up into the consciousness of senior marketers.  

In theory, that’s a good thing. After all, if employees aren’t willing to stand behind what your company does, why should customers? And getting cube-mates to amplify brand content on social media is a great way to break through the noise in a more authentic and cost-effective manner than advertising. 

So what’s the problem?

Employee advocacy is not a flip of the switch thing — it takes more than sending out a company-wide email asking everyone to tweet out the latest press release.  

If you want real and consistent participation across the organization, then employee advocacy needs to become part of your company culture. Here’s eight steps to help make that happen:
David Hain's insight:

Staff could be your best brand advocates - but are they? Often not where I consult!

more...
No comment yet.