Organisation Development
25.2K views | +8 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by David Hain from Leading Choices
onto Organisation Development
Scoop.it!

10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You - Forbes

10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You - Forbes | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Have you ever noticed leaders spend a lot of time talking about talent, only to make the same mistakes over and over again? Few things in business are as costly and disruptive as unexpected talent departures.

Via ThinDifference
David Hain's insight:

Can't think of better reasons...

more...
ThinDifference's curator insight, December 20, 2012 7:41 AM

Self reflection and evaluation time. Great points by Mike Myatt to read, think, change, and act:

 

1. You Failed To Unleash Their Passions

2. You Failed To Challenge Their Intellect

3. You Failed To Engage Their Creativity

4. You Failed To Develop Their Skills

5. You Failed To Give Them A Voice

6. You Failed To Care

7. You Failed to Lead

8. You Failed To Recognize Their Contributions

9. You Failed To Increase Their Responsibility

10. You Failed To Keep Your Commitments

Organisation Development
Developing healthy organisations
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How to Resolve Workplace Conflict

How to Resolve Workplace Conflict | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
In a 2012 study conducted by the American Psychological Association, 65 percent of Americans cited work as a top source of stress. The study cites a number stress sources, ranging from excessive workload to lack of social support. Many of the sources are rooted in conflict situations.

Whether at home or at work, conflict can leave us feeling frustrated, unmotivated and unfocused. We bring our work troubles home and our home troubles to work, with little opportunity (or time) to sort out tensions.

Collaborative environments, where individuals feel free to vigorously debate and challenge ideas, rather than “go along to get along,” are within reach. We typically think our ability to work without conflict depends on how others treat us, but Arbinger’s work suggests something different: our ability to cut through conflict depends on how we see others. The structure, the nature of real collaboration, is the same at home, at work, or in our communities. And it all begins with mindset.

David Hain's insight:

The role of an outward mindset in resolving conflict. A key attitude to cultivate in organisations and people today...

more...
donhornsby's curator insight, Today, 8:57 AM
Conflict is something that happens to all of us. What can you do when you have a conflict at work or home? Perhaps it's time to take a look at ourselves?
 
 
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Economics of Empathy

The Economics of Empathy | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
In the world of business, empathy is a hot topic. Articles on empathy have appeared in the Harvard Business Review, The Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, Time, and many other outlets. Empathy has also proven to be a popular theme of recent commencement addresses—last spring’s graduates of the University of Michigan and Howard University, where President Obama did the honors, heard speeches about the importance of empathy.

Why all the interest? In a word: technology. Every job that can be automated is, or will be in the not-too-distant future. As a result, organizations are shifting focus to the jobs and interpersonal skills that machines and software will never replace. A study published in the August 2015 issue of Harvard Business Review reports that, since the 1980s, occupations enjoying the highest job and wage growth are social skill-intensive. Work is becoming more team-based and requires the flexibility and adaptability that computers cannot deliver. Social or “soft” skills are now critical differentiators that distinguish organizations as both employers and competitors.

Empathy, as this article will show, is the most important of these soft skills for effective leadership. Unfortunately, while there is growing recognition of empathy’s importance, many organizations are unsure how, and if, empathy can be developed.

To bring greater clarity about empathy, we offer new research. Specifically, this research addresses the importance of having empathetic leaders, the developability of empathy, and the impact empathetic leaders can have on organizational performance.

David Hain's insight:

Useful data on why empathy pays out - literally! HT Mark Baer from LinkedIn post!

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 23, 2:10 PM
The Economics of Empathy
 
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Biohacking the Organization

Biohacking the Organization | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We live in the marketing age of all things natural, organic, and sustainable. Some astute observers are turning to the natural world for examples of practices that allow human beings to work together effectively in the age of the self-managed organization.

Ken Thompson’s book Bioteams: High Performance Teams Based on Natures Most Successful Designs describes how to create high performance teams based on examples found in the natural world. As he notes in the first chapter, “after [nature’s] 3.8 billion years of research and development, failures are fossils, and what surrounds us is the secret to survival. Like the viceroy butterfly imitating the monarch, we humans are imitating the best and brightest organisms in our habitat.”
David Hain's insight:

Bioteaming - sounds weird, but makes sense when you read the  article!

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 21, 12:39 PM
Biohacking the Organization
 
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Applying lean production to the public sector | McKinsey & Company

Applying lean production to the public sector | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Governments around the world want to deliver better education, better health care, better pensions, and better transportation services. They know that impatient electorates expect to see change, and fast. But the funds required to meet such expectations are enormous—particularly in the many developed economies where populations are aging and the public sector's productivity hasn't kept pace with that of the private sector. The need to get value for money from governments at all levels is therefore under the spotlight as never before. But cost-cutting programs that seek savings of 1 to 3 percent a year will not be enough and in some cases may even weaken the quality of service.

To address the problem, public-sector leaders are looking with growing interest at "lean" techniques long used in private industry. From the repair of military vehicles to the processing of income tax returns, from surgery to urban planning, lean is showing that it can not only improve public services but also transform them for the better. Crucially for the public sector, a lean approach breaks with the prevailing view that there has to be a trade-off between the quality of public services and the cost of providing them.
David Hain's insight:

Our public services are definitely on a diet, but I think they are still a long way from being lean! This was 2006, and still applies too often.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

A 70:20:10 Strategy that Actually Works: Free White Paper

A 70:20:10 Strategy that Actually Works: Free White Paper | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
When it comes to 70:20:10 strategy, there’s been a lot of academic talk, a lot of over-theorizing, and few actionable ideas to take away from it all. While we know the theory that most of effective learning coming from experiential, on-the-job activities (70), social engagement (20), and traditional, instructor-led, classroom-based training (10) likely has some strong basis in reality, we often read a lot of information on the model without many practical applications to take back to our organizations and develop a clear plan on how to implement it and, more importantly, prove value from it.
Designing a 70:20:10 strategy that works

That is all about to change, thanks to the release of a key white paper we are providing publicly today. It’s called Designing Learning that Works: Using 70:20:10 Effectively, and it is co-authored by two of the foremost experts on the subject: Charles Jennings and Jos Arets, co-founders of the 70:20:10 Institute itself.

In this report, published exclusively by Docebo, as working partner with the Institute, readers are provided with a comprehensive outline on how to implement a 70:20:10 strategy that not only delivers learning value but also business value for organizations that seek to implement this increasingly adopted framework. For example, one role defined in the framework, as laid out in this paper, is the “Performance Detective”, a crucial role to establish early on in the 70:20:10 implementation process and outlined below.
David Hain's insight:

Useful 101 on how to make 70;20;10 thinking work more effectively in your organisation!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Why you should love statistics

Why you should love statistics | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Think you're good at guessing stats? Guess again. Whether we consider ourselves math people or not, our ability to understand and work with numbers is terribly limited, says data visualization expert Alan Smith. In this delightful talk, Smith explores the mismatch between what we know and what we think we know.
David Hain's insight:

In the age of plentiful and gigantic data, a cogent warning on not always believing what you are told...!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Finding hidden leaders | McKinsey & Company

Finding hidden leaders | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Organizations should learn to hunt, fish, and trawl for the best talent.
David Hain's insight:

Are you turning over the stones throughout your organisation? You may be surprised about the talent you will find...!

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 22, 5:39 AM
Finding hidden leaders | McKinsey & Company
 
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

HubSpot’s 2016 Diversity Data

One of our core tenets at HubSpot is transparency. We believe, as Louis Brandeis once wrote, that “sunlight is the best disinfectant,” and that people, teams, and companies operate better when the de facto setting is to share instead of keeping information secret.
That’s great in theory, particularly when sharing things you’re excelling at as an organization. But practicing transparency is most important when it’s hard. Like many tech companies, we have made a public commitment to diversity. Like many tech companies, our numbers are less than pride-inducing.
But one of our goals as an organization is to attract, retain, and grow remarkable talent, and both candidates and employees shared a resounding ask from HubSpot that we share this data publicly. This reflects what we’re seeing in the broader tech culture. Diversity is an important topic that people care about, and we want to be a positive force in moving this conversation forward.
And so, here it is.
David Hain's insight:

One organisation trying to practice what it preaches!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How Action on Health and Wellbeing can Fill the UK's Productivity Gap

UK employees work some of the longest hours in Europe but produce 30% less per hour than workers in France, Germany and the US (according to the London School of Economics). Low productivity has been a thorn in the side of successive Governments and predictions for any future change aren’t optimistic. Whatever form Brexit takes, it will further expose the UK to global competition and even more stark comparisons in areas like productivity.

Looking from a health and wellbeing perspective, the productivity conundrum doesn’t look so complicated. The harder employers push their staff to be productive – focusing on new efficiencies in practices, cost-savings from digital working, ‘always on’ availability – the less they get from people over time. On a rational level, all the changes are sensible, but they are also mechanical. People wither under the combination of pressures and productivity suffers.

As the Willis Health & Productivity Survey Report 2015 argued, employers need to think more holistically when it comes to what impacts on productivity, not just try to pull levers that ratchet up what employees do in the time available.
David Hain's insight:

Doing more, faster, is not a sustainable recipe for productivity increases and often has several nasty consequences.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How to accelerate gender diversity on boards | McKinsey 

How to accelerate gender diversity on boards | McKinsey  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
The tone of much public discourse on the issue of women’s representation on boards has been pessimistic of late, and understandably so, given the crawl toward gender parity in the United States. Women currently hold 19 percent of board positions there, while in European countries such as France, Norway, and Sweden, where legislative or voluntary targets are in place, they hold more than 30 percent.

That said, some progressive companies are taking the lead, looking for female board members in new places and bringing them on board in new ways. Many feel they still have a long way to go, but their experiences are salutary for those that are lagging behind and want to better understand how to make change happen.

We recently conducted an analysis of companies in the S&P 500 to identify top performers in board diversity, defined as those with the highest percentage of women on their boards as of August 2016 (see Exhibit 1 for the top 25 and footnote 1 for the full top 60).1 It showed that women occupied at least 33 percent of board seats among the top 50 companies (up to nearly 60 percent for the highest percentage). In all, female representation on those boards has increased on average by 24 percentage points since 2005.
David Hain's insight:

The sooner gender diversity becomes the norm, the better our business and our world!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The LGBTQ equality movement has come too far to be beaten now

The LGBTQ equality movement has come too far to be beaten now | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Over the last year, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) community saw both the depths of hatred and discrimination aimed at us and some of the brightest, most historic moments of support we have ever received.
As the leader of the United States’ largest LGBTQ civil rights organization, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), I have had the somber task of attending vigil after vigil for those killed simply because of who they are — whether they were dancing away a Saturday night in Orlando or advocating for their rights in Bangladesh.
The LGBTQ community is under attack across the globe, and that’s why it’s incumbent upon all of us to keep pushing forward and strengthen our global movement.
David Hain's insight:

LGBTQ people - they're human, too! And they are talented - are you making the most of that?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Stop confusing employee engagement and culture

Stop confusing employee engagement and culture | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Employee engagement does not equal organisational culture and here’s why you should care.
Don’t get me wrong, employee engagement is an important thing to monitor, and it is definitely related to the culture of an organisation but there are some key differences between the two:
Employee engagement is the feelings that individuals have towards their work at the company. It reflects how motivated and bought-in an employee is to the organisation and their role there
Organisational culture is the behaviour the organisation displays as a collective. This behaviour is the response to your Organisation Operating System i.e. the unique structures, processes and communication methods every organisation creates that send signals to employees on how they should behave to be accepted in the organisation. Remember this, we’ll come back to it.
This difference is important to understand because whilst having high engagement amongst employees is usually a good thing, it doesn’t necessarily follow that you therefore have the right behaviours for your organisation. Behaviours are tangible actions you can see day-to-day such as decision-making processes or using open communication channels.
David Hain's insight:

Useful contribution too the endless employee engagement debate...

more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, January 6, 6:41 PM
Love the definitions of employee engagement and culture. Eliminating confusion about them is a key to ensuring 2017 is the best year yet for your business.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Taking another look at diversity and bias in the workplace

Taking another look at diversity and bias in the workplace | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Diversity in the workforce matters, there’s a lot of research to prove that diverse workplaces are more successful. We need women and those of various ethnic backgrounds especially when trying to design a product or service to represent the general population; the diverse population out there who are the buyers of your product or service.

We all make instinctive decisions, based on what ‘feels right’. Research shows that unconscious preferences (biases) play a significant part in the way we engage with others and the decisions we make about them. We all have automatic and unconscious biases, over which we have little control, no matter how unbiased we think we may be. We don’t set out to make poor decisions, it’s a question of how our brains operate and what is going on in our environment.
David Hain's insight:

Will 2017 be the year we stop talking about the benefits of diversity and actually make progress on it?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How Firms Are Creating Employee Experiences to Attract Top Talent

How Firms Are Creating Employee Experiences to Attract Top Talent | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
The big questions in this discussion center less on why leaders need to prioritize employee experiences and grow employer brand equities, and more on how. How do leaders build an employee experience so exciting that people come to work from day one engaged and ready to give their all? How do leaders sustain that experience and help their cultures thrive over time, so their brands, businesses and customers thrive too? How do leaders create a meaningful experience that leaves people feeling happy and positive, especially when it’s time for them to leave?

In the key takeaways and recommendations from its 2016 Global Workforce Study, Willis Towers Watson provided its answer to the how question: Businesses looking to increase engagement should begin offering their workforces more valuable “consumer-like experiences.”
David Hain's insight:

We spend so much time at work. It makes sense to give people experiences that maximise the value of that to them...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

s+b Trend Watch: Female Board Members on the Rise

s+b Trend Watch: Female Board Members on the Rise | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Women continue to gain ground in the boardroom, which may be good news for diversity. A recent study found that far more female directors place a high value on diversity than do their male colleagues.
David Hain's insight:

Some good news about a meaningful organisational trend!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Beyond Organisations

Beyond Organisations | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
We could argue that organisations do social good: providing safe spaces for individuals to earn a living, and developmental environments for them to prosper. But how true would that be? How much have organisations ever been for people, as opposed to simply exploiting them in service of the pyramid of wealth.

The mechanisms which served organisations so well may very well be the mechanisms that now work to unseat them, or at least reinvent them in a new form.

Is this just the start? So far we considered how the role of the organisation to own capability may have been eroded. Where does the vision itself reside? Where does the innovation and invention sit? Where does the purpose sit? Especially if we consider purpose beyond that simply of making money. Increasingly we see that vision itself is outsourced into community: communities emerge strongly around shared values and shared purpose, often global communities. We see people coming together to achieve great things outside of any formal organisational structure.
David Hain's insight:

Much change happening, often beneath the surface. But as @JulianSodd speculates, the plates are shifting and the landscape will change. Are you thinking about it?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Tribal Leadership: The Key To Building Great Teams

Tribal Leadership: The Key To Building Great Teams | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered about internal organization dynamics and why some groups of people (who aren't on the same team) are more successful than others? Why different “tribes” inside the organization seem to be at war with one another lowering performance in increasing politics? Why certain groups of people never seem to do anything? Or why its hard to move into the next level? Read on.
David Hain's insight:

How to develop and lever up the tribes in your organisation! A very useful view of org. dynamics.

more...
Daniel Tremblay's curator insight, February 13, 11:43 AM
Interessante façon de lire notre environnement interne ...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Time for a new gender-equality playbook | McKinsey & Company

Time for a new gender-equality playbook | McKinsey & Company | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
More than 75 percent of CEOs include gender equality in their top ten business priorities, but gender outcomes across the largest companies are not changing. Our research indicates, for example, that corporate America promotes men at 30 percent higher rates than women during their early career stages and that entry-level women are significantly more likely than men to have spent five or more years in the same role.

Why is gender inequality in the workplace so persistent despite growing attention from business leaders and the media—and what should we all do differently? Our research suggests we fall short in translating top-level commitment into a truly inclusive work environment. We see strong evidence that even when top executives say the right things, employees don’t think they have a plan for making progress toward gender equality, don’t see those words backed up with action, don’t feel confident calling out gender bias when they see it, and don’t think frontline managers have gotten the message.
David Hain's insight:

If diversity is so important, why is it not happening faster? Some analysis here...

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Using talent management to create value | McKinsey 

Using talent management to create value | McKinsey  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
One of the things that I’ve been doing is just looking at the language that HR people use. And even the people that are writing about the latest model of the competencies of the modern, future-proof CHRO—it’s all in the language of the “business partner.”

We need the CHRO to move from being a partner to the business to being a leader of the business. Therefore, we’re going to be using language that is leaders’ language. “We’re going to mobilize change. I’m going to be a mobilizer. I’m going to be a shaper of the organization.” It’s no longer change management and talent management and this kind of stuff.

The work of HR is going to change so it’s much more speed focused. And I think HR can become an operation that actually creates speed relative to competition by being able to reduce drag.

David Hain's insight:

In HR? What language are you using with business execs? Jargon, or business responsive?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Case Study: Amadori-EQ and Sales Performance • Six Seconds

A new case study, written by Giacomo Nottoli, Lorenzo Fariselli, Fabio Barnabè, Erika Paci
in collaboration with Massimiliano Ghini, Joshua Freedman and Paul Stillman, shows dramatic impacts from EQ training on sales performance.
Amadori is one of the leading companies in the Italian agro-food sector, an innovative company and specialist in the poultry market. The turnover in 2015 was more than 1.2 billion euros. The Company, founded forty years ago in Cesena, relies on collaboration with over 7,400 workers and has industrial plants, subsidiaries and branches all over Italy.

Here are a few excerpts and a link to the full CASE STUDY.
David Hain's insight:

Useful EQ empirical resource in the form of a case study.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

4 Top Leadership Trends for HR Managers in 2017

4 Top Leadership Trends for HR Managers in 2017 | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
What’s the biggest threat to building an engaged workforce in 2017? A recent study concludes: employee burnout.

The study, by Kronos Incorporated and Future Workplace, found that 95 percent of human resource executives think that burnout is what stands in the way of employee retention. What’s worse, they don’t think that a solution will be found in the near future.

HR managers point to plenty of reasons for employee burnout. Unfair compensation, unreasonable workloads and too much overtime or after-hours work are the three biggest causes. But they agree that a negative workplace culture is another big factor in burnout.

I would argue that culture is at the root of all other challenges in the workplace. It’s the foundation of policies, practices and perspectives that spell the difference between employee engagement and employees who are job hunting. And one of the most effective steps that leaders can take to build stronger work cultures is to put social impact squarely at the center of your corporate values.

David Hain's insight:

More on employee burnout - apparently it's screwing your engagement figures!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

OD Is Not A Recipe!

OD Is Not A Recipe! | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Lean, Six Sigma, Prosci, and other formulized change management methodologies all offer an orderly set steps to take—a recipe for ending waste, improving productivity, and otherwise accomplishing desired changes. There are, of course, several recipes from organization development practitioners that offer recipes. John Kotter’s eight steps are very popular. There are several versions of the stages of planned change that that typically include entry, contracting, data-gathering, intervention, and evaluation in one set of words or another. So what’s the problem?

The problem is that practical work of creating change where people are involved requires dealing with the anxiety, uncertainty, volatility, and emotionality that invariably show up when people are trying to get something done together. At those points in time, the rationality of structured formulations are not very useful. Creating change in human systems is as often as not a stressful process at any point in time. Under stress human beings tend to automatically operate in patterns that were set in during growing-up years. Some of those automatic reactions may be useful in the current situation and many will not be. In addition, the automatic patterns of some are likely to be in conflict with the patterns of others. These are situations were rationality is limited. Limited, particularly, because everyone believes that he or she is the only one being fully rational. Of course, I am over-simplifying.
David Hain's insight:

Heuristics are valuable because they show a picture - but the picture is never full-on, emotions'n'll reality. Human understanding needed!

more...
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 25, 3:57 AM

As much as many would like it, Org. Development is not formulaic in any way, shape or form.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

It’s 2017. Why are we still telling women to act like men at work?

It’s 2017. Why are we still telling women to act like men at work? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

Why is so much of the business advice for women out there to…..well…..act like a man? Why have so many performance reviews that I have received over the course of my career pushed me in that direction?

Take a seat at the table. Project confidence. Get rid of the up-speak. Take on p&l roles instead of support functions. Raise your hand for jobs you don’t think you’re fully prepared for, because you know the guys are. Be more forceful.

In other words, conform to how the guys are acting.

This is despite the fact that the power of diversity in driving business results is……wait for it……diversity. It’s not bringing together a bunch of people of difference and training them to behave the same way.

David Hain's insight:

What does the leadership construct look like in your organisation? Very important question...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Coming Tech Backlash – NewCo Shift

The Coming Tech Backlash – NewCo Shift | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
50% of the jobs will be gone in ~20 years. Not from the great sucking sound of jobs to Mexico that can be stopped with a wall. Not from moving offshore to China. From automation that is moving quickly from blue collar manufacturing to white collar information work. Second only to climate change, this is the greatest disruption of our time, and I don’t mean that word in a good way.
A recent study found 50% of occupations today will be gone by 2020, and a 2013 Oxford study forecasted that 47% of jobs will be automated by 2034. A Ball State study found that only 13% of manufacturing job losses were due to trade, the rest from automation. A McKinsey study suggests 45% of knowledge work activity can be automated.
94% of the new job creation since 2005 is in the gig economy. These aren’t stable jobs with benefits on a career path.
David Hain's insight:

The future of jobs requires radical thinking on the demand and supply side!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

20 Questions for Business Leaders

20 Questions for Business Leaders | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Whether we’re conscious of it or not, every management decision is motivated by a desire to find universal answers to very specific questions. People who succeed in organizations tend to be pragmatic problem solvers. They have to be, because of the myriad challenges they face. How to grow the enterprise. How to get work done. How to find customers. How to be themselves in the workplace. And so on. Because there are no easy answers to these complex problems, they test the answers by starting a company, launching a project, or making a move. As they succeed and fail, the most attentive of them learn from the results. The history of business is thus the story of entrepreneurs, executives, leaders, and employees, lurching from one experimental answer to another. They gain expertise and acumen, and profits and revenues, and, along the way, add to the theory of management.
David Hain's insight:

Management 101 in 20 pragmatic questions! Which ones are you not asking?

more...
No comment yet.