Organisation Development
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Organisation Development
Developing healthy organisations
Curated by David Hain
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Getting to the Critical Few Behaviors That Can Drive Cultural Change

Getting to the Critical Few Behaviors That Can Drive Cultural Change | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
Focusing on a “critical few” behaviors is one of the fundamental tenets of working effectively with organizational culture. Sometimes called keystone behaviors, these are patterns of acting that are tangible, repeatable, observable, and measurable, and will contribute to achieving an organization’s strategic and operational objectives. The behaviors are critical because they will have a significant impact on business performance when exhibited by large numbers of people; they are few because people can really only remember and change three to five key behaviors at one time.

In the work done by Katzenbach Center consultants around the world, we have seen how a focus on a critical few behaviors helps bring about changes that contribute to meaningful business outcomes, whether it is a medical devices manufacturer tallying 10 straight quarters of revenue growth or a technology firm saving US$100 million a year in warranty costs.
David Hain's insight:

Are you clear on the few critical behaviours you are trying to leverage for your organisations growth?

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Andrea Ross's curator insight, June 6, 7:57 AM

The recruitment industry can be pretty volatile which makes it even more important for recruitment leaders to embrace change than to shy away from it. Whether it be implementing new initiatives, changing current behaviors that entice success all need buy in from your current workforce and accountability from management to see it through. Happy Reading and Happy Friday. 

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 7, 12:37 PM

Interesting...

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What Gets You Up in the Morning?

What Gets You Up in the Morning? | Organisation Development | Scoop.it
What keeps you up at night? It’s a question we’ve heard posed in nearly every panel and senior leader interview conducted in recent years, and as a result, it has become tiresome and rote. But I believe the effect of this query is more pernicious than simply boring — stay awake long enough to think it through, and you’ll recognize its essentially negative nature. The question assumes that leaders are in the habit — indeed, that they have a responsibility — to let worry pervade their every hour, even those precious few required to refresh, balance, and sustain human effort.

That’s why it was bracing to hear the chief economist of a global bank describe how his CEO responded to this question at a recent meeting of senior employees. “I’m sick of that question,” the CEO had said. “Besides, it misses the point. More important is: What makes me leap out of bed in the morning?”
David Hain's insight:

Why do you bother? Maybe the answer is also a key to good OD...

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Ian Berry's curator insight, June 4, 12:21 AM
I like the reference to "challenge the process" If stuff is keeping you awake at night and/or you're getting up in the morning not looking forward to the day ahead then respectfully I suggest you must challenge your processes
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Create a Can-Do Learning Culture 

Create a Can-Do Learning Culture  | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

Ttoo often, when hands-on managers get involved in doing work they behave in ways that can limit their team’s learning. They jump into the fray, heads down, and plow through the work like the individual contributors they used to be. Or worse, they become micromanagers who encourage boss-dependence.


What’s needed is for these hands-on managers to first learn how to think differently about their dual roles as both players and managers. Instead of being held back by orthodox management thinking that encourages managers to think in terms of “either I’m leading my team or I’m doing work,” these hands-on managers need to shift their thinking about workforce development to a mindset that says “I can do work and do it in ways that accelerate learning for my team members.” Then leading and doing become mutually reinforcing, ongoing activities.

Once hands-on managers adopt this “both/and” mindset, they can begin to recognize the many opportunities they have to create a learning culture while working with their team members. But the key to taking full advantage of these opportunities is for hands-on leaders to learn some trainable skills.

David Hain's insight:

The difference between either/or, versus both/and, is vital to continued organisation development!

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The Power of Conversational Leadership — HBS Working Knowledge

The Power of Conversational Leadership — HBS Working Knowledge | Organisation Development | Scoop.it

"In many cases you have an executive team that's so sure about company strategy, but then you go inside the organization and find that nobody else has a clue,"


A strategic conversation based on 4 elements:

Intimacy is about leadership. Interactivity is about channels. Inclusion is about content. Intentionality is about goals, vision, and the strategy of getting things done.


Via Sabrina Murphy, Roy Sheneman, PhD, AlGonzalezinfo
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