Organic Pathos
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Organic Pathos
the reasonable language of art, music, and image
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Ruthie Foster "Aim For The Heart" (Live At KHUM)

Grammy-nominated Ruthie Foster performers live on KHUM in Humboldt County, California. Learn more at RuthieFoster.com and KHUM.com. 

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SFU Pipe Band at New York's Lincoln Center

The Simon Fraser University Pipe Band celebrates its 30th anniversary with a concert at New York City's Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, recording as ...

 

There’s been much to celebrate of late within the Vancouver bagpipe community. First, we had the city’s reversal of a ban on piping buskers—with Mayor Gregor Robertson taking the matter to heart, promising via Twitter that “There will be no ban on bagpipes or drums busking in Vancouver — not on my watch!”

 

And on Friday (May 4), the Simon Fraser University Pipe Band performed at the famed Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York, which was recorded as the band’s 11th CD. The performance was followed by a weekend of teaching workshops by the band at Archbishop Molloy high school in Queens, as part of the Highland Arts Festival.

 

According to a news release, Ontario’s Caledonia & District Pipes and Drums band were so keen to meet the SFU pipers that musicians piled into two trucks and drove 10 hours to NYC to take part in a workshop.

 

http://www.straight.com/article-678536/vancouver/sfu-pipe-band-wows-new-york

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Nikolaj Lund's Portraits of Classical Musicians

Nikolaj Lund's Portraits of Classical Musicians | Organic Pathos | Scoop.it
Danish-born 28 years old Nikolaj Lund is a semi-professional photographer based in the city of Aarhus, Denmark.

 

These are really interesting and unique!


Via Juan Carlos Hernandez
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The Civil Wars: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert

Watch Joy Williams and John Paul White's swooning chemistry and stirring harmonies at the NPR Music offices. Set List: "Barton Hollow" "Twenty Years" "Poison...
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Lone Raven at the Mansfield Public Library

Lone Raven at the Mansfield Public Library | Organic Pathos | Scoop.it

Lone Raven : Beth Chepote wrote: "Lone Raven at the Mansfield Public Library this afternoon, performing in the main lobby on the second floor.

 

Craig, Kara, Elizabeth and Sid put on a wonderful show full of music, history and even a bit of fancy footwork by Kara (This is the first time that I have seen her dance!) Not only are they fine musicians, but they are also extremely personable, and seem to enjoy the interchange with their fans. A wonderful time was had by all! Keep up the good work, guys and gals!"

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11 - Keith Jarrett - The good America- The Carnegie Hall Concert (2006)

Qui una recensione: http://italia.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=912 Tutti i diritti riservati.

 

Keith Jarrett - The good America- The Carnegie Hall Concert (2006)

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Jimmy Page Tells the Story of “Kashmir”

Jimmy Page Tells the Story of “Kashmir” | Organic Pathos | Scoop.it
One of the most original and distinctive songs Led Zeppelin ever recorded was the exotic, eight-and-a-half minute “Kashmir,” from the 1975 album Physical Graffiti..

 

In this clip from Davis Guggenheim’s film It Might Get Loud (2009), Jimmy Page explains the origins of the song to fellow guitarists Jack White and The Edge.

 

Then Page demonstrates it by picking up an old modified Danelectro 59DC Double Cutaway Standard guitar that he played the song with on some of Led Zeppelin’s tours.

 

 

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Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, May 8, 2012 9:56 AM
I love Open Culture! I bookmarked this wonderful insight some time ago, have shared it with FB friends and am so glad you are sharing it here!
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photo de John Taylor, pianiste jazz prêtée au mag online @londonjazz

photo de John Taylor, pianiste jazz prêtée au mag online @londonjazz | Organic Pathos | Scoop.it

photo de John Taylor, pianiste jazz prêtée au mag online @londonjazz

 

Here was a BritJazz event worth settling in for at the unnatural hour of 1.15 p.m. John Taylor, one of the great UK players who came up in the 1960s and 1970s, has built a solid international career since then without ever quite getting famous. To celebrate his 70th birthday, he gave us a festival commission from BBC Radio 3, performed by the band of his choice.

 

Not for the first time, he turned to Kurt Vonnegut Jr. for inspiration (come to think of it, he looks a little like the late writer these days as well). This time, the text was Harrison Bergeron, an early brief satire on the perils of enforced egalitarianism in which the talented are officially handicapped. It is pretty heavy-handed, by Vonnegut’s standards. The music, fortunately, wasn’t....

 


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Mandi Perkins - Why Pretend - Acoustic - Gibson Showroom

Acoustic version of Why Pretend at the GIbson Showroom in Beverly Hills.
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Meet the Digital Camera That Lets You Travel Through Time

Meet the Digital Camera That Lets You Travel Through Time | Organic Pathos | Scoop.it

At the BlackBerry World conference yesterday, RIM's Vivek Bhardwaj introduced a new camera being developed for the company's new product, the BlackBerry 10 -- one that allows users to detect faces and scroll through frames of the images themselves.

 

"We actually let you go back and forth in time," Bhardwaj said. Instead of missing a crucial instant -- instant-missing being a frustrating mainstay of photography both analog and digital -- RIM's new technology will allow photographers to capture "that perfect moment."

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In This Heart - Christy Moore & Sinead O Connor

 shine on --you pair -- of crazy diamonds!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdAEmX0OpMk&feature=related

 


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Best intro ever? University of Oregon takes field behind bagpipe-playing relief pitcher

Before the Oregon Ducks took the field before the Pac-12 game against the Cal Bears, Ducks Pitcher David Wylie and company decided to lighten to mood.

 

 

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Wynton Marsalis & Eric Clapton - Layla

After some talking to the audience by Clapton, which is very rare, the band play a fantastic New Orleans version of Clapton's most famous song. 


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The Antikythera Mechanism - 2D

More than 21 centuries ago, a mechanism of fabulous ingenuity was created in Greece, a device capable of indicating exactly how the sky would look for decades to come -- the position of the moon and sun, lunar phases and even eclipses. But this incredible invention would be drowned in the sea and its secret forgotten for two thousand years.

This video is a tribute from Swiss clock-maker Hublot and film-maker Philippe Nicolet to this device, known as the Antikythera Mechanism, or the world's "first computer". The fragments of the Mechanism were discovered in 1901 by sponge divers near the island of Antikythera. It is kept since then at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece.

For more than a century, researchers were trying to understand its functions. Since 2005, a pluridisciplinary research team, the "Antikythera Mechanism Research Project", is studying the Mechanism with the latest high tech available.

The results of this ongoing research has enabled the construction of many models. Amongst them, the unique mechanism of a watch, designed by Hublot as a tribute to the Mechanism, is incorporating the known functions of this mysterious and fascinating ancient Mechanism.

A model of the Antikythera Mechanism, built by the Aristotle University in Greece, together with the mechanism of the watch and this film in 3D are featuring in an exhibition about the Mechanism that is taking place in Paris, at the Musée des Arts et Métiers.

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Gil Evans - Willow Tree

From "New Bottle Old Wine" (1958) Gil Evans - Piano, Arranger, Conductor Johnny Coles - Trumpet Louis Mucci - Trumpet Ernie Royal - Trumpet Clyde Reasinger -...
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Israël, la terre promise des séries

Israël, la terre promise des séries | Organic Pathos | Scoop.it
Malgré l’exiguïté de son marché, Israël produit de brillantes séries. Une effervescence due à la créativité des auteurs et à un public sensibilisé au drame quotidien.

 

Israel, Jordan on the future Hollywood? The question does not seem so farfetched. Since the success of American adaptations of the series Be Tipul and Hatufim , respectively psychoanalytic In analysis and paranoid Homeland (an American ex-prisoner of war in Iraq, is suspected of working for Al-Qaeda), the eyes are on the Israeli production.

 

The Series Mania festival in Paris recently allowed to shed light on a generation unfamiliar with VO. At first glance, it resembles other: there is the political satire ( Polishuk Minister and his little clumsy lost in the intricacies of government), from melodrama to make you cry in the cottages ( The "A" Word and his autistic kid music lover ) or even a Lost Local ( Pillars of Smoke , being transposed U.S. for NBC).

"The Israeli public is bored easily"

 

The scale is yet different. "The market is small, the budgets are minimal: the pilot of Homeland costs as much as two seasons Hatufim! " says Gideon Raff, creator-writer-producer of both series, invited by Series Mania.


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THELONIOUS MONK - Blue Monk

Thelonious Monk: Blue Monk (Oslo, April 1966) Um clipe do video "Monk in Oslo". Thelonious Monk - piano. Charlie Rouse - tenor. Larry Gales - bass. Ben Riley...
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Bagpipes made in China not up to par

Bagpipes made in China not up to par | Organic Pathos | Scoop.it
"Scotland's bagpipe experts are sounding the lament over the loss of a traditional skill which means material for a vital part of the instrument is being mass produced thousands of miles away in China.

 

They claim the situation is nearing “crisis point” because the sheepskins for the bespoke bag under the piper’s armpit are often not of the right quality.

 

Pipers say there is the danger of the sound of the pipes being affected. If the bags are not airtight and able to absorb moisture from the piper’s breath, it can settle on the instrument’s reeds, affecting the tuning.


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Jorge Luis Borges’ 1967-8 Norton Lectures On Poetry (And Everything Else Literary)

Jorge Luis Borges’ 1967-8 Norton Lectures On Poetry (And Everything Else Literary) | Organic Pathos | Scoop.it

Like most literary geeks, I’ve read a lot of Jorge Luis Borges. If you haven’t, look into the influences of your favorite writers, and you may find the Argentine short-story craftsman appearing with Beatles-like frequency.

 

Indeed, Borges’ body of work radiates inspiration far beyond the realm of the short story, and even beyond literature as commonly practiced. Creators from David Foster Wallace to Alex Cox to W.G. Sebald to the Firesign Theater have all, from their various places on the cultural landscape, freely admitted their Borgesian leanings.

 

That Borges’ stories — or, in the more-encompassing term adherents prefer to use, his “fictions” — continue to provide so much fuel to so many imaginations outside his time and tradition speaks to their simultaneous intellectual richness and basic, precognitive impact. Perhaps “The Garden of Forking Paths” or “The Aleph” haven’t had that impact on you, but they’ve surely had it on an artist you enjoy.

 

Now, thanks to UbuWeb, you can not only read Borges, but hear him as well. They offer MP3s of Borges’ complete Norton Lectures, which the writer gave at Harvard University in the fall of 1967 and the spring of 1968:


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Triste Espagna with worlds largest recorder - Bassano Quartet

http://www.bassano.nl Adriana Breukink (left) plays worlds largest recorder. Triste Espagna - Juan del Encina (1468 - 1529). Sterrenfestival Oude Muziek Utre...

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José James and Junior Mance - "Everyday I have the Blues"

The legendary Junior Mance performs "Everyday I have the Blues" with vocalist and composer José James at Dizzy's Club Coca Cola in New York City. This night ...

 

This night was the release of José's 2012 album with pianist Jeff Neve "For All We Know" on the Verve/Impulse label.

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Exploring the poignant longing of Americana with very old instruments

 

'There's an inarticulate longing that can only be expressed through music," says Shelley Phillips.


Those who long for beautifully played traditional Celtic music will be delighted by the Santa Cruz-based Coulter/Phillips Ensemble's concert at Montalvo Arts Center's Historic Villa on Sunday.


With Phillips on Celtic harp and English horn, her husband, composer/arranger Barry Phillips on cello, and William Coulter on guitar, they'll present an instrumental program that will feature mostly Northern European folk music, with some Norwegian and Swedish numbers, as well as a couple of originals


"In Scandinavian music," Shelley Philips says, "there's a lot more minor. The instrumentation we have makes a good little orchestra for the yearning emotions of that music."


The trio will also offer their interpretations of Shaker music, one of Shelley Phillips' specialties.


"The Shakers were a very creative group of people, and there are like a thousand songs. They're very poignant. They're also a little quirky, because the words came first. So the melodies are very declamatory, following the words. It makes for very interesting, fun music."

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