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10 Big Trends for Agriculture

10 Big Trends for Agriculture | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

I’ve got a number of keynotes coming up in the New Year focused on the agricultural sector, and have done quite a few in the past.

My insight resonates with the agricultural crowd, whether farmers, ranchers, or agricultural support and bio-science companies. I recently spoke to the top 100 cattle, stockyard and feedlot operators in the US at a private event in Sonoma County, California. The US Farm Credit Cooperative has brought me in twice. Want to think about opportunity? Read the post, Agriculture 2020! Innovation, Growth & Opportunity — and also read on below.

Massive growth in food demand: The UK Food and Agriculture Association estimates that the world population will increase 47%, to 8.9 billion, by 2050. That’s a potentially huge food marketplace. That fact, more than anything, spells the reality that the agricultural industry is full of potential opportunity!A continuing rampup in efficiency: Simple fact: global agriculture must double in the next 30 years to sustain this type of population growth. Add this reality check: there is little new arable land in the world. The result is that existing producers will have to continue to focus on smarter, better, more efficient growing in order to meeting demand.Hyper-science: One of the realities of the infinite idea loop in which we now find ourselves is this: while there are 19 million known chemical substances today, the number is constantly doubling every 13 years… with some 80 million by 2025, and 5 billion by 2100. Science is evolving at a furious pace, and with science at the root of agriculture, we will continue to see constant, relentless new methods of improving crop and livestock yield.Innovation defines success: Growers that focus on innovation as a core value will find success; their innovation will focus on the triple-feature need for growth, efficiency and ingestion of new science. It will be by adopting new methodologies, products, partnerships and ideas that they will learn to thrive.Retail and packaging innovation drive agricultural decisions: Do this: stare at a banana. Did you know that Chiquita banana has come up with a special membrane that doubles the shelf-life of the product, doing this regulating the flow of gases through the packaging? Take a look at Naturepops: each lollipop is wrapped in fully bio-degradable film made from plant matter, and the bags they come in are made from recycled paper, water-based ink and poly lactic acid made from cornstarch. There’s a huge amount of innovation happening with packaging companies and on the store shelf, and all of these trends have a big impact on agriculture.Intelligent packaging moves front and center: Innovation with packaging will take an even bigger leap in years to come, and will involve hyperconnectivity, a trend that will be driven by food safety, tracability, country of origin and nutrition labelling needs. Our lives are soon to be transformed by packaging that can “connect” to the global data grid that surrounds us; and its’ role will have been transformed from being that of a “container of product” to an intelligent technology that will help us with use of the product, or which will help us address safety and tracability issues.The energy opportunity: Agriculture is set to play a huge role as we wean ourselves away from our dependence on oil and natural gas. The US Department of Energy plans to see alternative fuels provide 5% of the nations energy by 2020, up from 1% today. And it is expected that there will be $1.2 billion in new income for farmers and rural landowners by getting involved with new energy sources such as windpower. Europe plans to have a market that involves at least 20% usage of bio-fuels by 2020, and Feed & Grain estimates that liquid fuels from agricultural feed could replace 25% to 30% of US petroleum imports by that time.Convenience and health take center stage: We will continue to see rapid change in consumer taste and expectations as people comes to place more emphasis or doing their best with the little time that they have. For example, it is expected that fresh-cut snacks grew from an $8.8 billion market in 2003 to $10.5 billion by 2004, according to the International Fresh-Cut Produce Association, as part of a trend in which produce and fruit continue to compete with traditional snacks. Expect such unique trends to growth both in terms of number and rapidity.Direct consumer-producer relationships blossom: As this technology evolves and as people become more concerned about the safety of what they eat, a natural result is a frenetic rate of growth in direct relationships between growers and consumers. Check out SouthDakotaCertifiedBeef– that type of thing defines the future of this trend!Generational transformation: perhaps the biggest trend is that we are about to witness a sea-change in the rate by which new ideas in the world of agriculture are accepted, as a new generation of technology-weaned, innovative younger people take over the family farm.Partnership defines success: If there is one trend I emphasize in every industry I’m involved with, it is that no one individual or organization can know everything there is to know. As I indicated in my I found the future in manure article, this trend is also becoming prevalent in agriculture. We will continue to see an increasing number of partnerships between growers and advisers, suppliers, buyers, retailers and just about everyone else, so that they learn to deal with the massive complexities that emerge from rapid change and innovation.
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Loran Sneller's curator insight, September 29, 2013 3:41 PM

In the year 2050 the world population will increase 47%, to 8.9 billion. Global agriculture must double in the next 30 years to sustain this type of population growth.The result is that existing producers will have to continue to focus on smarter, better, more efficient growing in order to meeting demand.One of the realities of the infinite idea loop in which we now find ourselves is this: while there are 19 million known chemical substances today, the number is constantly doubling every 13 years… with some 80 million by 2025, and 5 billion by 2100. There’s a huge amount of innovation happening with packaging companies and on the store shelf, and all of these trends have a big impact on agriculture.

amagazinecalledbible's curator insight, October 1, 2013 7:25 AM

#windpower #sustainabledevelopment #renewable

Lydia Dingeman's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:09 PM

This artical is about how the world population is going to increace by 43% by 2050. Agriculture needs to become more efficant in order to keep up with the poplaustion groth of the world.

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Sanatana Pages: Organic farming and the centrality of the cow

Sanatana Pages: Organic farming and the centrality of the cow | Organic Farming | Scoop.it

Subhash Palekar Raises Agriculture to Spiritual Levels

For over sixty years, Indian agriculture was in a slumber. Our lands were scandalized by an unknown thing called as synthetic fertlizer. This was done to help the farmer get a 'better' harvest.

As the farmer started using it, he immediately noticed that, his soil had become infertile and could no longer bear crops for the next season. He was advised to add more and more fertilizer to the soil to compensate for the nutrient loss. Soon he was faced with another threat. The plants that grew with fertilizer needed pesticides. Soon, he started using these pesticides, which are deadly poisons. He noticed that the pests had become resistant to these chemicals as time went by. He was puzzled.

Our farmer forgot the ancient lesson that the soil HAD LIFE. He forgot that there were natural laws that governed the soil which his ancestors had obeyed from time immemorial. By thus obeying the laws , they had taken bumper harvests and had kept the land well cared for and transferred the land intact for posterity.

Subhash Palekar

It was at this time that a great mind set out to work in this field. He himself was a graduate of Agricultural science from a 'modern university'. He set out to work in his field using the British devised ways of Fertlisers and Pesticides and became an utter failure. He also ruined his land.

Then he set out to research on how our ancestors did so well in Agriculture without any of these chemicals. He consulted the Vedas, and the ancient wisdom literature. The result is a revolutionary, path breaking method, which Sri Subhash calls as 'Zero Budget Natural Farming'. Sri Subhash tried his method in his own soil and replicated it in various other fields tasting success every time.

An inspired Sri Subhash set out to teach this method to his countrymen. He has so far conducted not less than 1000 workshops, all heavily attended, to spread this new way of life for farmers.

The fundamental concept in Sri Subhash's work is that
1. Soil does not need nutrients to be added.
2. The soil has micro organisms which GENERATE NUTRIENTS for the soil.
3. It is possible to revive a fertliser damaged soil back to the natural ways.
4. That the new method require no money to do Agriculture.

Fascinating, is it not ? Read on for some more.

Sri Subhash says the pivot of 'Zero Budget Natural Farming' is the desi cow. He says that the desi cow's Urine, Cow dung and Milk have all the qualities required to rejuvenate the soil. Just ONE desi cow, says Sri Subhash, is all that is required to maintain a 30 acre Farm. He laments that the Desi- Jersi hybrid cows are of no use in his scheme of things.

What a sad thing ? The desi (country) cow is now has such a dwindling population that we need to revive them on a war footing. I wondered why the hybrid Jersi cow is unfit. A publication of 'Govardan', a voluntary organisation for Cow protection, says that the high yield Jersi was produced by crossing a wild pig and an Australian cow breed !

Sri Subhash has some formulas to revive the soil. One is 'Jeevamrutam'. This is not a replacement for Fertlizer , he says. Jeevamrutam is only a catalyst for the soil to generate its nutrients. He says that the 'organic manure','earthworm manure' are fads and are another recipe for disaster.

Sri Subhash condemns the university taught concept of burning the leftover plants after harvest. He says that these are to be left over in the soil itself by turning them over into the soil. This process of 'Mulching' helps the soil prepare its own manure.

And what about pests ? Subhash maintains that a naturally grown plant fights pests. But the plants in transit in chemical ravaged field can be protected by simply prepared 'natural pesticides' which arwe usually buttermilk, pepper and such simple combinations.

The Government Sponsored Chemical Mafia

A govermental survey states that the fertliser subsidy alone was abot Rs 13,000.00 crores in the year 2000. Add to this the pesticide subsidy and the farmer's burden. A report says that the pesticide business in India is the fourth largest in the world! Imagine what would have happened if the money is spent on raising desi cows, strengthening ponds and lakes, and protecting the village fiorests !

There are some criminal agricultural scientists who sit and lord over every governmental commission on Agriculture. These are the very people who are in hand in glove with the synthetic mafia and have been the cause of so much decline in production. Sri Subhash has alleged that our country imports foodgrains of about 5 million tonnes every year. This fact is not known to many Indians. The governments cheats here also.

Recently, a central minister went on record stating that poor Indians are eating more and this is causing problems. It is no wonder with such people at the helm, our Agriculture remains without policy.

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Eric Larson's curator insight, March 27, 2015 1:18 PM

Interesting questions!!!

Brandon Chesney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:25 AM

This farmer in India had been using synthetic fertilizer to grow his crops. Because he used this he noticed that the soil became Infertile and he couldn't grow new crops for the next season. Since he could not grow anymore crops he started using more and more fertilizers which in turn led to having to use Pesticides. He had forgot the whole kind of law set in place about how the soil has life and was better than any other fertilizers or pesticides.

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The explanation of the capillary in the soil - Technology

The explanation of the capillary in the soil - Technology | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Trees do not 'drink' from ground water.
Trees 'drink' from capillary water.  Their instrument to drink from the capillary water is the primary root.  In this photo you can see the primary roots going downwards to the dark soil.  This
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Inside The Vertical Farm Growing What It Calls "The World's First Post-Organic" Produce

Inside The Vertical Farm Growing What It Calls "The World's First Post-Organic" Produce | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Without using any pesticides or chemicals, Bowerya new vertical farming startup outside of New York Citydelivers fresh leafy greens within one da
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"Dark forces" are coming for your organic food

"Dark forces" are coming for your organic food | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
So says the former Obama USDA appointee who helped create national organic standards.
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400 Million Acres Of Farmland Could Disappear—Unless This Woman Gets Her Way

400 Million Acres Of Farmland Could Disappear—Unless This Woman Gets Her Way | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
This activist supports young organic farmers and is fighting to protecting retired farmland from developers.
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The Farmer of Gujarat, Badhada

Such was the greatness of traditional farming


"The Farmer of Gujarat" Pragajibhai Mangukiya Village: Badhada Taluko: Savarkundala District: Amreli State: Gujarat Country: India

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Eric Larson's curator insight, January 27, 11:25 AM
Farming in India.
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Volunteers salvage the crops supermarkets refuse

Volunteers salvage the crops supermarkets refuse | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Farmer Joe Rolfe is standing in a field of perfectly edible but unsaleable sprouts. Mr Rolfe, manager at an organic farm near King's Lynn, Norfolk, says the losses will run into "thousands and thousands" for the 10 acres of sprouts – about 120,000 sprout trees – because they have "some pests in them". The 27-year-old has been eating them himself all week as they only need to be washed by hand, but "we can't sell them to the supermarkets because of the way they look with pest damage".
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Eric Larson's curator insight, January 27, 11:27 AM
Salvage refuse?
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Practical Answers | Practical Action

Practical Answers | Practical Action | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
This is a site where we can get to know about farmers from poor countries and their struggle and solution for a decent livelihood.

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BACK TO THE FUTURE: WILL AN OLD FARMING PRACTICE PROVIDE A MARKET NICHE FOR GEORGIAN FARMERS? 

BACK TO THE FUTURE: WILL AN OLD FARMING PRACTICE PROVIDE A MARKET NICHE FOR GEORGIAN FARMERS?  | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The FINANCIAL, Business News & Multimedia, Global brands, Investments and Personal Finance. Regional focus: United States, Georgia, Ukraine, Turkey, EU
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Eric Larson's curator insight, January 27, 11:31 AM
Olde ideas of value?
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10 tools for farming in dry climates - E4C

10 tools for farming in dry climates - E4C | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Farmers in dry climates manage to coax crops from sandy soil and water them with rain and even fog. These are 10 tools that enable farming in dry climates.
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Eric Larson's curator insight, May 4, 2016 2:00 PM
Farming in dry climates?
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(With music) Capillary water and how it can help to fight desertification

Groasis – a high tech agricultural company from Holland - sells the low cost Groasis Ecological Water Saving Technology. The Groasis Ecological Water Savin
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Grassroots innovation? A fertiliser made of curd is reducing farming costs in Bihar

Grassroots innovation? A fertiliser made of curd is reducing farming costs in Bihar | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Scientists are yet to test this method but farmers in northern Bihar swear by it.
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The reel story on the farm

The “Reel Change” short documentary film production class that starts July 10 on Rossellini’s farm in Brookhaven.
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Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield? | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
The benefits of city-based agriculture go far beyond nutrition.

Via Japan Aquaponics
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Eben Lenderking's curator insight, February 28, 6:11 PM

Fascinating and wonderful

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Tree People L.A - Kiss The Ground Stories

Andy Lipkis, Tree People Los Angeles. Get involved and learn more at www.treepeople.org Receive our weekly tips for living regeneratively
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Charcoal at Pebble Garden - Part 2/3 - Bernard's Charcoal Kiln

 This is a 3 part series. I was not able to load the first part. View this and in all probabalitiy you will get the links for part 1 & 3.



Bernard Declercq demonstrates the process of creating charcoal with an Iwasaki charcoal kiln. Part 1, Charcoal for Depleted Soils

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A Fight Over Soil Causes Deep Rift In Organic Industry

A Fight Over Soil Causes Deep Rift In Organic Industry | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
There is a battle going on in the organic industry over hydroponics , the technique of growing plants without soil. The debate gets at the very heart of
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What can you do with a home DNA machine? One unexpected answer: grow better truffles

What can you do with a home DNA machine? One unexpected answer: grow better truffles | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Personal DNA testing machines are bringing lab-grade genetic science within reach. One farmer is using DNA testing to cultivate truffles
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Biological Permaculture Part 1 | Permaculture Magazine

Dr. Elaine Ingham gives us the “dirty” details of soil biology, its importance, and her own biological permaculture farm.
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Drones over the Caribbean

Drones over the Caribbean | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Over the last few decades technology in agriculture has been growing and developing. Modern farmers and agricultural operators are developing new technologies and innovations each day to increase p…
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13 Proven Techniques to grow better indoor basil in less time

13 Proven Techniques to grow better indoor basil in less time | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
RT @basil_grower: 13 proven techniques to grow better #basil in less time

> https://t.co/6Hkk56bhs3

#gardening #urbanfarming #food https:…
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Engineering For Change - By Engineers, For Everyone

Engineering for Change provides a forum to connect, collaborate, solve challenges and share knowledge among a growing community of engineers, technologists, social scientists, NGOs, local governments and community advocates, who are dedicated to improving the quality of life all over the world.
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Lots of useful information.

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Best Organic Coffee Brands: Top Ten Reviews

Best Organic Coffee Brands: Top Ten Reviews | Organic Farming | Scoop.it
Want quality coffee? Try these organic coffee beans, you won't regret it!. We review the top ten organic coffee beans. Taste them all and choose your favorite!
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Eric Larson's curator insight, July 10, 2016 7:49 AM
Organic coffee?