Organ Donation & Transplant Matters Resources
6.6K views | +1 today
Follow
Organ Donation & Transplant Matters Resources
Combining reports, research findings and topic reviews
Curated by Deborah Verran
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deborah Verran
Scoop.it!

What Happens When A Living Kidney Donor Needs A Transplant in the United States?

What Happens When A Living Kidney Donor Needs A Transplant in the United States? | Organ Donation & Transplant Matters Resources | Scoop.it
A new study from the United States examines how well the system works to prioritize the needs of previous live kidney donors if they end up needing a kidney transplant of their own.

Live kidney donors can receive priority for a kidney transplant if it is determined that their remaining kidney is failing. However it seems that this information may not be fully understood across the healthcare system within the United States.


Hence the importance of this retrospective review of just over 200 live kidney donors. For more information click on the banner headline.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah Verran
Scoop.it!

Organ donation: is an opt-in or opt-out system better?

Organ donation: is an opt-in or opt-out system better? | Organ Donation & Transplant Matters Resources | Scoop.it


Around the world, organ donation policies vary greatly between countries. So is it better to have a donation system where people have to opt in or one where they opt out?

 

This question was asked recently by some researchers in the United Kingdom. They examined the rates of organ donation in a number of countries around the world according to whether opt in or opt out types of legislation were in place.

 

There appears to be higher rates of deceased donor organ donation in countries with an opt out system whilst the opposite was true for living donation. As outlined in this article there are other factors which contribute to the rates of organ donation both within and between countries.

 

The ex CEO of BC Transplant in Canada (Bill Barrable) outlines why moving to a presumed consent system was not supported back in time within Canada -

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/organ-donation-the-perils-of-presumed-consent/article20783431/?__scoop_post=2cd7f780-450d-11e4-a362-001018304b75&__scoop_topic=543333#__scoop_post=2cd7f780-450d-11e4-a362-001018304b75&__scoop_topic=543333

 

Finally, the results of some recently published research on whether there is a region of the brain which can be identified to be associated with altruism in live kidney donors can be viewed via this link-

 

http://www.medicaldaily.com/organ-donor-brains-bigger-region-linked-altruism-neural-roots-generosity-303638?__scoop_post=e685b850-4244-11e4-f327-001018304b75&__scoop_topic=543333#.VB_emdJ6-m4.twitter

 

 

 

 

Deborah Verran's insight:

The rates of organ donation within and between countries represent the end result of many factors which all need to be in place in order for optimal rates of organ donation to be sustained.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah Verran
Scoop.it!

New book highlights shortage of organ donors - beds.ac.uk

New book highlights shortage of organ donors - beds.ac.uk | Organ Donation & Transplant Matters Resources | Scoop.it

Have an interest in policy underpinning organ donation and transplantation? Looking for a written resource containing interesting information?

 

Organ Donation and Transplantation - Public Policy and Clinical Perspectives, is packed with expert chapters and has just been released as an e-Book in the United Kingdom. It provides specialist information via chapters on public policy as well as clinical developments in organ transplantation.

 

The link to the eBook is- http://www.intechweb.org/books/show/title/organ-donation-and-transplantation-public-policy-and-clinical-perspectives

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah Verran
Scoop.it!

Does China still harvest organs of executed? Doctors divided (not really!)

Does China still harvest organs of executed? Doctors divided (not really!) | Organ Donation & Transplant Matters Resources | Scoop.it

A Canadian patient's receipt of a kidney transplant recently after waiting just three days during a recent visit to China raised an immediate red flag among surgeons at the Montreal-based Transplantation Society. A turnaround that quick indicates the organ likely came from the body of an executed prisoner. 


The case adds to doubts among many doctors internationally about whether China has met its pledge to stop harvesting the organs of executed inmates. The practice is widely condemned by the World Health Organization and others because of concerns over coercive practices and fears it could encourage executions. China officially claims it ended the harvesting of executed inmates' organs in January 2015. 


China sought to use the Transplantation Society's decision to hold its annual meeting in Hong Kong this last month as validation of its organ donation system. 


But Dr. Philip O'Connell, the society's president, rejected that interpretation, even if it appeared some reforms had been successful. In a country that routinely suppresses discussions of human-rights issues and cracks down on lawyers and independent groups, government officials and state media have been relatively open about China's problems with organ donation. 


Dr. Huang Jiefu, head of the system that supervises transplants in Chinese hospitals, has been the public face of the country's attempts to change its transplant practices. Huang publicly admitted in 2005 that doctors used executed prisoners' organs. In 2011, Huang and other officials estimated that 65 percent of transplanted organs from the deceased came from executed prisoners. In an interview Friday with The Associated Press, Huang said he was confident hospitals under his purview were moving to donated organs, but that black-market surgeries still persist. "We still have a long way to go," Huang said. According to the government, Chinese doctors performed 10,057 organ transplants in 2015.  


To read the full story click on the banner headline

Deborah Verran's insight:
Nb the word harvest in the title of this story needs to be replaced by either organ recovery or organ retrieval in 2016. Nevertheless this latest online post provides some additional detail on the current issues with organ donation in China along with confirmation from a senior official that there are still unresolved problems,
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah Verran
Scoop.it!

Do employers need social media policy or common sense in the HR department?

Do employers need social media policy or common sense in the HR department? | Organ Donation & Transplant Matters Resources | Scoop.it

Does your workplace have a comprehensive social media policy and/or guideline? What is more important, lots of rules or common sense? In fact there needs to be a balance of and a combination of rules and common sense as both are required.

 

For an interesting read click on the banner headline........... Of note there may be legal implications of transgressing workplace social media policies, which is something you need to be mindful of before posting onto for eg. Facebook and Twitter. 

 

This post comes via HR magazine- http://www.hrmagazine.co.uk

 

 

more...
No comment yet.