operationalizing ...
Follow
Find
174 views | +0 today
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Talks
onto operationalizing complexity
Scoop.it!

Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?

Russell Foster is a circadian neuroscientist: He studies the sleep cycles of the brain. And he asks: What do we know about sleep? Not a lot, it turns out, for something we do with one-third of our lives. In this talk, Foster shares three popular theories about why we sleep, busts some myths about how much sleep we need at different ages -- and hints at some bold new uses of sleep as a predictor of mental health.

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/russell_foster_why_do_we_sleep.html


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
operationalizing complexity
complexity and the day-to-day operations of firms
Curated by Bill Aukett
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization

The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

Two great trends are evident in the evolution of life on Earth: towards increasing diversification and towards increasing integration. Diversification has spread living processes across the planet, progressively increasing the range of environments and free energy sources exploited by life. Integration has proceeded through a stepwise process in which living entities at one level are integrated into cooperative groups that become larger-scale entities at the next level, and so on, producing cooperative organizations of increasing scale (for example, cooperative groups of simple cells gave rise to the more complex eukaryote cells, groups of these gave rise to multi-cellular organisms, and cooperative groups of these organisms produced animal societies). The trend towards increasing integration has continued during human evolution with the progressive increase in the scale of human groups and societies. The trends towards increasing diversification and integration are both driven by selection. An understanding of the trajectory and causal drivers of the trends suggests that they are likely to culminate in the emergence of a global entity. This entity would emerge from the integration of the living processes, matter, energy and technology of the planet into a global cooperative organization. Such an integration of the results of previous diversifications would enable the global entity to exploit the widest possible range of resources across the varied circumstances of the planet. This paper demonstrates that it's case for directionality meets the tests and criticisms that have proven fatal to previous claims for directionality in evolution.

 

The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization
John E. Stewart

Biosystems
Available online 1 June 2014

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystems.2014.05.006


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, June 15, 7:06 PM

Cooperation is the best way to improve, sustain, maintain, and repair.  Competition is what drives everyone and everything towards something different, be it competition for resources or competition against the elements around us.

 

I don't get what the point of competition amongst the species is for.  Part of cooperation, after all, is knowing what works, learning about what could work better or doesn't work, and then letting the negative or sub-optimal slip back beneath the waves of ignorance, such that the new ways can rise to prominence.

 

Change is the only constant in this universe of universes.

 

Yet cooperation, I think, yields the higher and stronger of the universal structures that are out there, even if it means that there are still losers and winners.  The only difference is the level of consent and consensus that's reached within the social, ecological, economical, and/or political landscape.  One way works towards what is best.  The other way simply yields what is best at competing, which is not the same as being the actual best solution to a given problem or condition.

 

Think about it.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, June 16, 6:51 AM

is this the end of stove pipes?

Ra's curator insight, June 22, 3:02 AM

Have I been reading too much science fiction?

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Frontiers in Neuroscience: Physical principles for scalable neural recording of the brain

Frontiers in Neuroscience: Physical principles for scalable neural recording of the brain | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

Neuroscience depends on monitoring the electrical activities of neurons within functioning brains (Alivisatos et al., 2012; Bansal et al., 2012; Gerhard et al., 2013) and has advanced through steady improvements in the underlying observational tools. The number of neurons simultaneously recorded using wired electrodes, for example, has doubled every 7 years since the 1950s, currently allowing electrical observation of hundreds of neurons at sub-millisecond timescales (Stevenson and Kording, 2011). Recording techniques have also diversified: activity-dependent optical signals from neurons endowed with fluorescent indicators can be measured by photodetectors, and radio-frequency emissions from excited nuclear spins allow the construction of magnetic resonance images modulated by activity-dependent contrast mechanisms. Ideas for alternative methods have been proposed, including the direct recording of neural activities into information-bearing biopolymers (Kording, 2011; Zamft et al., 2012; Glaser et al., 2013).

 

Simultaneously measuring the activities of all neurons in a mammalian brain at millisecond resolution is a challenge beyond the limits of existing techniques in neuroscience. Entirely new approaches may be required, motivating an analysis of the fundamental physical constraints on the problem. We outline the physical principles governing brain activity mapping using optical, electrical, magnetic resonance, and molecular modalities of neural recording. Focusing on the mouse brain, we analyze the scalability of each method, concentrating on the limitations imposed by spatiotemporal resolution, energy dissipation, and volume displacement. Based on this analysis, all existing approaches require orders of magnitude improvement in key parameters. Electrical recording is limited by the low multiplexing capacity of electrodes and their lack of intrinsic spatial resolution, optical methods are constrained by the scattering of visible light in brain tissue, magnetic resonance is hindered by the diffusion and relaxation timescales of water protons, and the implementation of molecular recording is complicated by the stochastic kinetics of enzymes. Understanding the physical limits of brain activity mapping may provide insight into opportunities for novel solutions. For example, unconventional methods for delivering electrodes may enable unprecedented numbers of recording sites, embedded optical devices could allow optical detectors to be placed within a few scattering lengths of the measured neurons, and new classes of molecularly engineered sensors might obviate cumbersome hardware architectures. We also study the physics of powering and communicating with microscale devices embedded in brain tissue and find that, while radio-frequency electromagnetic data transmission suffers from a severe power–bandwidth tradeoff, communication via infrared light or ultrasound may allow high data rates due to the possibility of spatial multiplexing. The use of embedded local recording and wireless data transmission would only be viable, however, given major improvements to the power efficiency of microelectronic devices.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Talks
Scoop.it!

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos - Steven Strogatz, Cornell University - YouTube

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos - Steven Strogatz, Cornell University - YouTube | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

This course of 25 lectures, filmed at Cornell University in Spring 2014, is intended for newcomers to nonlinear dynamics and chaos. It closely follows Prof. Strogatz's book, "Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos: With Applications to Physics, Biology, Chemistry, and Engineering." The mathematical treatment is friendly and informal, but still careful. Analytical methods, concrete examples, and geometric intuition are stressed. The theory is developed systematically, starting with first-order differential equations and their bifurcations, followed by phase plane analysis, limit cycles and their bifurcations, and culminating with the Lorenz equations, chaos, iterated maps, period doubling, renormalization, fractals, and strange attractors. A unique feature of the course is its emphasis on applications. These include airplane wing vibrations, biological rhythms, insect outbreaks, chemical oscillators, chaotic waterwheels, and even a technique for using chaos to send secret messages. In each case, the scientific background is explained at an elementary level and closely integrated with the mathematical theory. The theoretical work is enlivened by frequent use of computer graphics, simulations, and videotaped demonstrations of nonlinear phenomena. The essential prerequisite is single-variable calculus, including curve sketching, Taylor series, and separable differential equations. In a few places, multivariable calculus (partial derivatives, Jacobian matrix, divergence theorem) and linear algebra (eigenvalues and eigenvectors) are used. Fourier analysis is not assumed, and is developed where needed. Introductory physics is used throughout. Other scientific prerequisites would depend on the applications considered, but in all cases, a first course should be adequate preparation

 

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos - Steven Strogatz, Cornell University

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbN57C5Zdl6j_qJA-pARJnKsmROzPnO9V


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Jean-Michel Livowsky's curator insight, June 2, 12:22 AM

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos...

Jean-Michel Livowsky's curator insight, June 2, 12:23 AM

Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Talks
Scoop.it!

Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different

Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it
Adam Rutherford on the rise, fall and rise of the genetics of intelligence.

Via FastTFriend, Complexity Digest
more...
FastTFriend's curator insight, May 25, 2:35 AM

Adam Rutherford on the rise, fall and rise of the genetics of intelligence.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Special Issue: The Science of Inequality

Special Issue: The Science of Inequality | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

In 2011, the wrath of the 99% kindled Occupy movements around the world. The protests petered out, but in their wake an international conversation about inequality has arisen, with tens of thousands of speeches, articles, and blogs engaging everyone from President Barack Obama on down. Ideology and emotion drive much of the debate. But increasingly, the discussion is sustained by a tide of new data on the gulf between rich and poor.
This special issue uses these fresh waves of data to explore the origins, impact, and future of inequality around the world.

 

What the numbers tell us
Gilbert Chin, Elizabeth Culotta

Science 23 May 2014:
Vol. 344 no. 6186 pp. 818-821
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6186.818

http://www.sciencemag.org/site/special/inequality/index.xhtml


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Decision accuracy in complex environments is often maximized by small group sizes

Individuals in groups, whether composed of humans or other animal species, often make important decisions collectively, including avoiding predators, selecting a direction in which to migrate and electing political leaders. Theoretical and empirical work suggests that collective decisions can be more accurate than individual decisions, a phenomenon known as the ‘wisdom of crowds’.

[...] Our results demonstrate that the conventional view of the wisdom of crowds may not be informative in complex and realistic environments, and that being in small groups can maximize decision accuracy across many contexts.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
AbbVie Scoop.it Home Page's curator insight, May 1, 6:26 AM

The Couzin lab (Princeton) is focused on 'group animal behavior,' and although this paper isn't available directly, the title made me wonder if the observations might apply to the way we make decisions in what is certainly a complex environment...  Perhaps worth a read...

Damien Thouvenin's curator insight, May 3, 2:58 AM

Deux chercheurs de l'université de Princeton démontent la soi-disant "sagesse des foules" et montrent que, si l'intelligence collective d'un petit groupe produit de meilleurs résultats que le travail individuel, ceci est en revanche faut pour de grands groupes. La diversité des points de vue et des sensibilités d'un petit groupe tend à filtrer le "bruit" environnant tandis qu'il est amplifié par une foule.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Crisis Responses and Crisis Management: what can we learn from Biological Networks?

The generality of network properties allows the utilization of the ‘wisdom’ of biological systems surviving crisis events for many millions of years. Yeast protein-protein interaction network shows a decrease in community-overlap (an increase in community cohesion) in stress. Community rearrangement seems to be a cost-efficient, general crisis-management response of complex systems. Inter-community bridges, such as the highly dynamic ‘creative nodes’ emerge as crucial determinants helping crisis survival.

 

Crisis Responses and Crisis Management: what can we learn from Biological Networks?
Péter Csermely, Agoston Mihalik, Zsolt Vassy, András London

Systema: connecting matter, life, culture and technology

Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

http://www.systema-journal.org/article/view/115 ;


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 13, 7:46 AM

Love the insights generated by looking at existing systems and how one could apply or learn from how they function in a different context - rich with insight and ideas.

Eli Levine's curator insight, April 13, 3:54 PM

Interesting.

 

Check it out.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Talks
Scoop.it!

Dan Ariely on ‘The Honest Truth About Dishonesty’

Dan Ariely on ‘The Honest Truth About Dishonesty’ | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

Everyone cheats a little from time to time. But most major betrayals within organizations – from accounting fraud to doping in sports – start with a first step that crosses the line, according to Dan Ariely, a leading behavioral economist at Duke and author of The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone – Especially Ourselves. That step can start people on a “slippery slope.” In this interview with Wharton management professor Adam Grant, Ariely helps leaders understand how to prevent people from taking that first step, how to create a code of conduct that makes rules and expectations clear and why good rules are critical to organizations.


http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/dan-ariely-dishonestys-slippery-slope/


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 11, 10:15 AM

This is troubling to me, mainly because I know how easily I could fall victim to a potential slippery slope series of events that turns me from one side to another.  I'm just being honest about it.  There's no real reason yet to differentiate me from Nancy Botwin, who goes from a surburban widow to a major queen pin in the drug trade (besides the fact that I'm not likely to deal drugs).  Am I seriously one of the few human beings who will question him/herself with regards to their own integrity?

 

I don't know.

 

But if this research is accurate, it's bound to be something that's near universal for our species.  That means that you and I are effected by it, whether we like or admit it or not.

 

Sad and scary.

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

The Simple Rules of Social Contagion

It is commonly believed that information spreads between individuals like a pathogen, with each exposure by an informed friend potentially resulting in a naive individual becoming infected. However, empirical studies of social media suggest that individual response to repeated exposure to information is far more complex. As a proxy for intervention experiments, we compare user responses to multiple exposures on two different social media sites, Twitter and Digg. We show that the position of exposing messages on the user-interface strongly affects social contagion. Accounting for this visibility significantly simplifies the dynamics of social contagion. The likelihood an individual will spread information increases monotonically with exposure, while explicit feedback about how many friends have previously spread it increases the likelihood of a response. We provide a framework for unifying information visibility, divided attention, and explicit social feedback to predict the temporal dynamics of user behavior.

 

The Simple Rules of Social Contagion
Nathan O. Hodas & Kristina Lerman

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 4343 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep04343


Via Shaolin Tan, NESS, Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

The Ecology of Collective Behavior

Similar patterns of interaction, such as network motifs and feedback loops, are used in many natural collective processes, probably because they have evolved independently under similar pressures. Here I consider how three environmental constraints may shape the evolution of collective behavior: the patchiness of resources, the operating costs of maintaining the interaction network that produces collective behavior, and the threat of rupture of the network. The ants are a large and successful taxon that have evolved in very diverse environments. Examples from ants provide a starting point for examining more generally the fit between the particular pattern of interaction that regulates activity, and the environment in which it functions.

 

Gordon DM (2014) The Ecology of Collective Behavior. PLoS Biol 12(3): e1001805. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001805

 


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Do-It-Yourself Urban Design: The Social Practice of Informal “Improvement” Through Unauthorized Alteration

There are numerous ways in which people make illegal or unauthorized alterations to urban space. This study identifies and analyzes one that has been largely ignored in social science: explicitly functional and civic-minded informal contributions that I call “do-it-yourself urban design.” The research, which began as an investigation into more “traditional” nonpermissable alterations, uncovered these cases—from homemade bike lanes and street signs to guerrilla gardens and development proposals—that are gaining visibility in many cities, yet are poorly accounted for by existing perspectives in the literature. This article examines the existing theories and evidence from interviews and other fieldwork in 14 cities in order to develop the new analytical category of DIY urban design. I present findings on the creators of these interventions, on their motivations to “improve” the built environment where they perceive government and other development actors to be failing, and on the concentration of their efforts in gentrifying areas. This introduces the possibility of conflict and complicates their impact. I argue that DIY urban design has wide-ranging implications for both local communities and broader urban policy.

 

Do-It-Yourself Urban Design: The Social Practice of Informal “Improvement” Through Unauthorized Alteration
. Gordon C. C. Douglas

City & Community

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cico.12029


Via Manu Fernandez, Complexity Digest
more...
Molly Martin's curator insight, March 17, 1:55 AM

An interesting read for anyone curious as to how individuals and indie community  organizers rework local infrastructures.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Simplicity amid Complexity

We live in interesting times as we watch diverse effects of human activities on Earth's climate emerge from natural variability. In predicting the outcome of this evolving inadvertent experiment, climate science faces many challenges, some of which have been outlined in this series of Science Perspectives (1–6): reducing the uncertainty in climate sensitivity; explaining the recent slowdown in the rate of warming and its implications for understanding internal variability; uncovering the factors that control how and where the land will become drier as it warms; quantifying the cooling due to anthropogenic aerosols; explaining the curious evolution of atmospheric methane; and predicting changes in extreme weather. In addition to these challenges, the turbulent and chaotic atmospheric and oceanic flows seemingly limit predictability on various time scales. Is the climate system just too complex for useful prediction?

 

Simplicity amid Complexity
Isaac Held

Science 14 March 2014:
Vol. 343 no. 6176 pp. 1206-1207
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1248447


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from CxBooks
Scoop.it!

Questioning Life and Cognition: Some Foundational Issues in the Paradigm of Enaction

John Stewart's book is a life achievement. It looks at three foundational issues for Enaction envisaged as a tenable paradigm for Cognitive Science: at first, the question of a “missing link” between the first living organisms – which, logically, have been dissipative structures simple enough to arise by spontaneous generation – and the simplest extant organisms that exhibit too complex a DNA-based genetic system to have arisen in that way; secondly, a relatively specific area with the cardinal virtue of being open to empirical refutation, i.e. the primitive immune system of vertebrates. Finally, the author tackles the social dimension of human cognition, presenting some of the basic concepts of sociology that typically need to be integrated into a potential paradigm of Enaction.

 

http://www.enactionseries.com/library/bookjs/co/Original_book_JS.html


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Talks
Scoop.it!

▶ Towards a Self-Regulating Society

Towards a Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20

Via Complexity Digest
more...
Anne Landreat's curator insight, June 17, 4:12 AM

Vers une société auto-régulée. En Anglais.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How Much Data is Created Every Minute | An infographic

How Much Data is Created Every Minute | An infographic | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

How Much Data is Created Every Minute an infographic Every minute massive amounts of it are being generated phone, website application across the Internet.

 

...I don’t anticipate the growth of data slowing down in my lifetime. There’s too much goodness to be mined from it all.

 

Recently, we decided to revisit the topic and found, not surprisingly, that the pace of data creation continued to accelerate. Our first infographic, for example, showed that Facebook users shared 684,478 pieces of content. Fast forward a couple of years and that number has exploded to 2,460,000 pieces. Insane....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
andree johnston's curator insight, June 1, 5:24 AM

How Much Data is Created Every Minute an infographic Every minute massive amounts of it are being generated phone, website application across the Internet. 

AffiliateMarketHelp's curator insight, June 1, 9:43 AM

It is advised that you take inventory of your online practises.....it is probably overdue for a 'tune-up' to keep up with the times....there is an older song "the times, they are a' changin'..""

AffiliateMarketHelp's curator insight, June 1, 10:05 AM

It is advised you consider a revision to your online tactics to keep up with the numbers......words from an older song "the times, they are a' changin'"....

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

How languages evolve - Alex Gendler

How languages evolve - Alex Gendler | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it
Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past.

Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Dynamics on complex networks
Scoop.it!

Shock waves on complex networks : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Shock waves on complex networks : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it
Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable nodes, we introduce the concept of node-basin size, a purely topological property which we show to be strongly correlated to the average load of a node.

Via Shaolin Tan
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, May 20, 5:19 AM

Indeed, this is intuitive enough without the mathematics to back it up.  This could be mapped out and used for prioritizing the defense or attack of various points within the network, either in the digital or analog worlds.

 

Way cool science!

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

RISK OF WAR: WHAT, IF THE "BALANCE OF THREAT" IS UNSTABLE?

(...) The worrisome misconception is that only shifts in relative power can destabilize a “balance of threat”. This falsely assumes that balanced situations, called equilibria, are inherently stable, which is actually often not the case. For illustration, consider the simple experiment of a circular vehicle flow (see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Suugn-p5C1M ): although it is apparently not difficult to drive a car at constant speed together with other cars, the equilibrium traffic flow will break down sooner or later. If only the density on the traffic circle is higher than a certain value, a so-called "phantom traffic jam" will form without any particular reason – no accident, no obstacles, nothing. The lesson here is that dynamical systems can easily get out of control even if everyone has good information, the latest technology and best intentions.

What if this is similarly true for the balance of threat? What if this equilibrium is unstable? Then, it could suddenly and unexpectedly break down. (...)

 

RISK OF WAR: WHAT, IF THE "BALANCE OF THREAT" IS UNSTABLE?

by Dirk Helbing (ETH Zurich)

http://futurict.blogspot.ch/2014/04/risk-of-war-what-if-balance-of-threat.html


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 28, 5:19 PM

Indeed, I don't understand how Obama and his advisers think that challenging Russia or China is going to lead to positive results for either the US or for the whole of the world that we're apart of.

 

For example, it would have been better for us to have mediated the Ukrainian crisis, rather than throw down as a partisansky of Ukrainian-Ukraine against Russia.  It was a move that failed to grasp the complexity of the situation, and the legitimate concerns of the Russian people living in Ukraine and of the Russian state in Moscow.

 

Over on the other side of Asia, our increased military alliance with the Philippines might also lead to problems for us in the long term.  Our first priority, I think, should be the defense of our homeland, not the protection of our imperial assets.  We should be finding out what the people of the Philippines want and need, along with the people of all countries that are currently in dispute with China over territorial waters and resources.  It is more important that we keep in touch with the societies, rather than the specific governments of these countries, and develop methods to directly arm them in case of Chinese attack.  That way, we can defend the people of these countries from Chinese attack, while maintaining good relations with them, thus, adding to our influence more than through direct military engagement with China.

 

It's just a few thoughts on the matters.

 

One small slip from us or any of the other actors, and the whole of civilization as we know it goes up in smoke.

That, or our species dies.

 

Enjoy your night.


Think about it.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Talks
Scoop.it!

The Strange New Science of Chaos - YouTube

A 1989 program, with Lorenz


Via Bernard Ryefield, Complexity Digest
more...
Vasileios Basios's curator insight, April 1, 6:43 AM

Wow! such a rare delightful material .... Ralph Abraham and Lorenz who could imagine!

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 16, 5:31 AM

to be watched by the new generations!  old certitudes and new doubts?

Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 19, 6:56 PM

Great to hear Lorenz

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Complex Thinking for a Complex World – About Reductionism, Disjunction and Systemism, by Edgar Morin

This article is based on the keynote address presented to the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR) in 2012, on the occasion of Edgar Morin receiving the Bertalanffy Prize in Complexity Thinking, awarded by the Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS).
The following theses will be elaborated on: (a) The whole is at the same time more and less than its parts; (b) We must abandon the term "object" for systems because all the objects are systems and parts of systems; (c) System and organization are the two faces of the same reality; (d) Eco-systems illustrate self-organization.

 

Complex Thinking for a Complex World – About Reductionism, Disjunction and Systemism
Edgar Morin

Systema: connecting matter, life, culture and technology Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

http://www.systema-journal.org/article/view/257


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 13, 7:21 PM

There is a kind of meditation in Buddhist practice known as analytical meditation.  It's purpose is to inform us about an object, all of its properties and all of the associations, connections and contexts that it can have in the individual and collective sense. 

 

We're not going to be perfect coming up with all of the connections all of the time.  However, I think it's a good starting basis for the purposes of analyzing complex systems and all of the layered, interconnected parts.  We are one, and one is all.

 

The universe is us as well as around us.


And that's a scientific fact, it seems.

 

Think about it.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 14, 11:37 AM

objects versus systems?

luiy's curator insight, May 1, 6:20 PM

In this light is interesting to consider the nature of life. Living systems represent a complex type of organization. The organization of a living system is more complex than the  organization of the molecules of which it is composed. However, this organization is  achieved using only molecules from the physical universe – living systems are not made from something like ‘living matter’, but from ordinary physical and chemical substances.


“Life” is a property created through complex self-organisation. Life is characterized by processes of self-reproduction and self-repair, processes that involve knowledge and  memory. The central feature of a living system is the self-organizational capacity to produce
and reproduce itself. However, as von Foerster noted, calling this self-organisation is paradoxical, because the organizational processes of life require a continuous input of energy. We need energy even when we sleep – energy to drive our heartbeat, our digestion, our breathing. We use energy in all moments of life. However, we also need to compensate for the dissipation of energy in line with the second law of thermodynamics, and this means we must take in energy from the environment. We do this by ingesting material  that contains energy, and to this we need knowledge of the environment, and in particular knowledge of the organization of the environment. So self-organisation requires an interplay between the knowledge of how to organize the self and the knowledge of how the environment is organized.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Information: A Personal Synthesis

This article is an attempt to capture, in a reasonable space, some of the major developments and currents of thought in information theory and the relations between them. I have particularly tried to include changes in the views of key authors in the field. The domains addressed range from mathematical-categorial, philosophical and computational approaches to systems, causal-compositional, biological and religious approaches and messaging theory. I have related key concepts in each domain to my non-standard extension of logic to real processes that I call Logic in Reality (LIR). The result is not another attempt at a General Theory of Information such as that of Burgin, or a Unified Theory of Information like that of Hofkirchner. It is not a compendium of papers presented at a conference, more or less unified around a particular theme. It is rather a highly personal, limited synthesis which nonetheless may facilitate comparison of insights, including contradictory ones, from different lines of inquiry. As such, it may be an example of the concept proposed by Marijuan, still little developed, of the recombination of knowledge. Like the best of the work to which it refers, the finality of this synthesis is the possible contribution that an improved understanding of the nature and dynamics of information may make to the ethical development of the information society.

 

Information: A Personal Synthesis
by Joseph Brenner
Information 2014, 5(1), 134-170; doi:10.3390/info5010134
http://www.mdpi.com/2078-2489/5/1/134/ ;


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 11, 10:57 AM

All information that we receive from the universe that is around us is second hand.  It is possible to alter and shift them out of our own volition or of the volition of someone else, provided that we're either caught unawares or allowing it to happen just as it is theoretically possible to shift the universe around us, so that we experience something different than what would ordinarily happen (again, only theoretically, not necessarily in actuality).  The universe is out there, I think, just as we're most certainly apart of it.  There are laws to this place as well which influence and effect our abilities to act, our perception of the choices that we have and the choices that we actually are left with at the end of the day, when all's said and told.  We are just receptors, analyzers and synthesizers of information with our biological bodies.  We are all slaves, ultimately, to our biology, our circumstances and the consequences of our actions.

 

Just my two cents on information.

 

Think about it.

António F Fonseca's curator insight, April 12, 2:46 AM

Brenner and Daniel Cohnitz have a very good book about the subject "Information and Information Flow" that covers almost all aspects of Information Theory. Unfortunatelly the 'Matecmatical Information Theory' of Jan Kahre didn't have yet the same attention.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from CxAnnouncements
Scoop.it!

Modeling Complex Systems for Public Policies – a book project

The Institute for Applied Economic Research (Ipea) – a Brazilian think-tank linked to the government – is making a request for proposals for eight IDB consultants to contribute with chapters to a seminal book on Complex Systems applied to Public Policies. On one hand, the project aims at pushing forward the modeling frontier, its methodologies and applications for the case of Brazil. On the other hand, the project pursues actual improvement on the understanding of public policies’ mechanisms and effects, through complex systems’ tools and concepts.
The book encompasses five broad themes: (1) concepts and methods; (2) computational tools; (3) public policy phenomena as complex systems (specifically: society, economics, ecology and the cities); (4) applied examples in the world and its emergence in Brazil; and (5) possibilities of prognosis, scenarios and policy-effect analysis using complex systems tools.
The consultant is expected to deliver a proposed extended summary, a preliminary version to be discussed in a seminar in Brazil (July-September 2014) and the final version of the chapter.

 

http://www.ipea.gov.br/portal/index.php/?option=com_content&view=article&id=21745&Itemid=5


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Swarming in Biological and Related Systems

Swarming in Biological and Related Systems | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

In the last 15 years, the collective motion of large numbers of self-propelled objects has become an increasingly active area of research. The examples of such collective motion abound: flocks of birds, schools of fish, swarms of insects, herds of animals etc. Swarming of living creatures is believed to be critical for the population survival under harsh conditions. The ability of motile microorganisms to communicate and coordinate their motion leads to the remarkably complex self-organized structures found in bacterial biofilms. Active intracellular transport of biological molecules within the cytoskeleton has a profound effect on the cell cycle, signaling and motility. In recent years, significant progress has also been achieved in the design of synthetic self-propelled particles. Their collective motion has many advantages for performing specific robotic tasks, such as collective cargo delivery or harvesting the mechanical energy of chaotic motion.

(...)

In this focus issue we have tried to assemble papers from leading experts which we hope will provide a current snapshot of this young and rapidly expanding field of research. They cover both theoretical and experimental investigations of the dynamics of active matter on different spatial and temporal scales.

 

Focus on Swarming in Biological and Related Systems
Lev Tsimring, Hugues Chate, Igor Aronson

2014 New J. Phys. 16

http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/focus/Focus%20on%20Swarming%20in%20Biological%20and%20Related%20Systems


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Creativity, like evolution, is merely a series of thefts

Creativity, like evolution, is merely a series of thefts | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it
We can blame evolution for making us little more than the glorified karaoke singers we are. Or as Voltaire put it: "originality is nothing but judicious imitation"

Via Claudia Mihai, Complexity Digest
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, March 15, 10:02 AM

It's all one built upon the other.


What I've been proposing for government is not going to alter the base goals of the political leaders.  In fact, I think it's going to improve their chances of being elected until death, if they follow it correctly, and ultimately preserve our social institutions until the eventual end of the species and, if our descendents are still around, beyond that.

 

What I'm observing, as a political and social scientist, is that through benevolently motivated, effectively sensed and executed policy for the sake of the other in the society, that governments tend to be able to last longer, be more legitimate in the eyes of the public and, ultimately, get carried on, with its members, throughout the generations.

 

Some people simply do not and will not have what it takes to act as these effective, benevolent and empirically grounded leaders, regardless of party affiliation and label.  That is how, I think, our current institutions are failing, because we've populated these political systems with people who don't care, won't care and/or don't have the sense to act for the effective sake of the other for their own sakes.  It's in our legislative systems as well as our administrative systems.  It's killing themselves as much as it's killing our people.  And it's just a brain type who doesn't get the concept of working with others, rather than over or against them.

 

Think about it.

Arjen ten Have's curator insight, March 18, 6:08 AM

Basic but nice essay on how objects of use, creativity and biological evolution are all hung up on the same principles: Hey this works better, what if I combine it with that?

Costas Bouyioukos's curator insight, March 18, 10:40 AM

Mark Pagel writes about our "ability" to innovate.

Rescooped by Bill Aukett from Papers
Scoop.it!

Info-computational Constructivism and Cognition

Context: At present, we lack a common understanding of both the process of cognition in living organisms and the construction of knowledge in embodied, embedded cognizing agents in general, including future artifactual cognitive agents under development, such as cognitive robots and softbots. Purpose: This paper aims to show how the info-computational approach (IC) can reinforce constructivist ideas about the nature of cognition and knowledge and, conversely, how constructivist insights (such as that the process of cognition is the process of life) can inspire new models of computing. Method: The info-computational constructive framework is presented for the modeling of cognitive processes in cognizing agents. Parallels are drawn with other constructivist approaches to cognition and knowledge generation. We describe how cognition as a process of life itself functions based on info-computation and how the process of knowledge generation proceeds through interactions with the environment and among agents. Results: Cognition and knowledge generation in a cognizing agent is understood as interaction with the world (potential information), which by processes of natural computation becomes actual information. That actual information after integration becomes knowledge for the agent. Heinz von Foerster is identified as a precursor of natural computing, in particular bio computing. Implications: IC provides a framework for unified study of cognition in living organisms (from the simplest ones, such as bacteria, to the most complex ones) as well as in artifactual cognitive systems. Constructivist content: It supports the constructivist view that knowledge is actively constructed by cognizing agents and shared in a process of social cognition. IC argues that this process can be modeled as info-computation.

 

Info-computational Constructivism and Cognition
Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic

Constructivist Foundations Volume 9 · Number 2 · Pages 223–231

http://www.univie.ac.at/constructivism/journal/9/2/223.dodig


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.