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What If Everything Ran Like the Internet?

What If Everything Ran Like the Internet? | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

When the Internet was first starting to catch on in the 1980s, I was invited, as a representative of a large business consulting organization, to a day-long seminar explaining what this new phenomenon was and how businesses should be responding to it. It was led by a man who now makes millions as a social media guru (I won’t embarrass him by identifying him), but at the time he warned that the Internet had no future. The reason, he said, was that it was “anarchic” — there was no management, no control, no way of fixing things quickly if they got “out of hand”. The solution, he said, was for business and government leaders to get together and create an orderly alternative — “Internet 2″ he called it — that would replace the existing Internet when it inevitably imploded. Of course, he couldn’t have been more wrong.


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Olivier Auber's comment, May 29, 2013 5:19 AM
In fact, the Internet as we know it, is also hierarchical, due to its silos and protocols.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8c0sX6j5D_c
luiy's curator insight, May 31, 2013 9:57 AM

Organization models --- > Internet --> “wirearchy” --> nature’s model of self-organizing, self-adapting, evolving complex systems

operationalizing complexity
complexity and the day-to-day operations of firms
Curated by Bill Aukett
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The Strange New Science of Chaos - YouTube

A 1989 program, with Lorenz


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Vasileios Basios's curator insight, April 1, 9:43 AM

Wow! such a rare delightful material .... Ralph Abraham and Lorenz who could imagine!

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 16, 8:31 AM

to be watched by the new generations!  old certitudes and new doubts?

Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 19, 9:56 PM

Great to hear Lorenz

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Complex Thinking for a Complex World – About Reductionism, Disjunction and Systemism, by Edgar Morin

This article is based on the keynote address presented to the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR) in 2012, on the occasion of Edgar Morin receiving the Bertalanffy Prize in Complexity Thinking, awarded by the Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS).
The following theses will be elaborated on: (a) The whole is at the same time more and less than its parts; (b) We must abandon the term "object" for systems because all the objects are systems and parts of systems; (c) System and organization are the two faces of the same reality; (d) Eco-systems illustrate self-organization.

 

Complex Thinking for a Complex World – About Reductionism, Disjunction and Systemism
Edgar Morin

Systema: connecting matter, life, culture and technology Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

http://www.systema-journal.org/article/view/257


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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 13, 10:21 PM

There is a kind of meditation in Buddhist practice known as analytical meditation.  It's purpose is to inform us about an object, all of its properties and all of the associations, connections and contexts that it can have in the individual and collective sense. 

 

We're not going to be perfect coming up with all of the connections all of the time.  However, I think it's a good starting basis for the purposes of analyzing complex systems and all of the layered, interconnected parts.  We are one, and one is all.

 

The universe is us as well as around us.


And that's a scientific fact, it seems.

 

Think about it.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 14, 2:37 PM

objects versus systems?

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Information: A Personal Synthesis

This article is an attempt to capture, in a reasonable space, some of the major developments and currents of thought in information theory and the relations between them. I have particularly tried to include changes in the views of key authors in the field. The domains addressed range from mathematical-categorial, philosophical and computational approaches to systems, causal-compositional, biological and religious approaches and messaging theory. I have related key concepts in each domain to my non-standard extension of logic to real processes that I call Logic in Reality (LIR). The result is not another attempt at a General Theory of Information such as that of Burgin, or a Unified Theory of Information like that of Hofkirchner. It is not a compendium of papers presented at a conference, more or less unified around a particular theme. It is rather a highly personal, limited synthesis which nonetheless may facilitate comparison of insights, including contradictory ones, from different lines of inquiry. As such, it may be an example of the concept proposed by Marijuan, still little developed, of the recombination of knowledge. Like the best of the work to which it refers, the finality of this synthesis is the possible contribution that an improved understanding of the nature and dynamics of information may make to the ethical development of the information society.

 

Information: A Personal Synthesis
by Joseph Brenner
Information 2014, 5(1), 134-170; doi:10.3390/info5010134
http://www.mdpi.com/2078-2489/5/1/134/ ;


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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 11, 1:57 PM

All information that we receive from the universe that is around us is second hand.  It is possible to alter and shift them out of our own volition or of the volition of someone else, provided that we're either caught unawares or allowing it to happen just as it is theoretically possible to shift the universe around us, so that we experience something different than what would ordinarily happen (again, only theoretically, not necessarily in actuality).  The universe is out there, I think, just as we're most certainly apart of it.  There are laws to this place as well which influence and effect our abilities to act, our perception of the choices that we have and the choices that we actually are left with at the end of the day, when all's said and told.  We are just receptors, analyzers and synthesizers of information with our biological bodies.  We are all slaves, ultimately, to our biology, our circumstances and the consequences of our actions.

 

Just my two cents on information.

 

Think about it.

António F Fonseca's curator insight, April 12, 5:46 AM

Brenner and Daniel Cohnitz have a very good book about the subject "Information and Information Flow" that covers almost all aspects of Information Theory. Unfortunatelly the 'Matecmatical Information Theory' of Jan Kahre didn't have yet the same attention.

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Modeling Complex Systems for Public Policies – a book project

The Institute for Applied Economic Research (Ipea) – a Brazilian think-tank linked to the government – is making a request for proposals for eight IDB consultants to contribute with chapters to a seminal book on Complex Systems applied to Public Policies. On one hand, the project aims at pushing forward the modeling frontier, its methodologies and applications for the case of Brazil. On the other hand, the project pursues actual improvement on the understanding of public policies’ mechanisms and effects, through complex systems’ tools and concepts.
The book encompasses five broad themes: (1) concepts and methods; (2) computational tools; (3) public policy phenomena as complex systems (specifically: society, economics, ecology and the cities); (4) applied examples in the world and its emergence in Brazil; and (5) possibilities of prognosis, scenarios and policy-effect analysis using complex systems tools.
The consultant is expected to deliver a proposed extended summary, a preliminary version to be discussed in a seminar in Brazil (July-September 2014) and the final version of the chapter.

 

http://www.ipea.gov.br/portal/index.php/?option=com_content&view=article&id=21745&Itemid=5


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Swarming in Biological and Related Systems

Swarming in Biological and Related Systems | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

In the last 15 years, the collective motion of large numbers of self-propelled objects has become an increasingly active area of research. The examples of such collective motion abound: flocks of birds, schools of fish, swarms of insects, herds of animals etc. Swarming of living creatures is believed to be critical for the population survival under harsh conditions. The ability of motile microorganisms to communicate and coordinate their motion leads to the remarkably complex self-organized structures found in bacterial biofilms. Active intracellular transport of biological molecules within the cytoskeleton has a profound effect on the cell cycle, signaling and motility. In recent years, significant progress has also been achieved in the design of synthetic self-propelled particles. Their collective motion has many advantages for performing specific robotic tasks, such as collective cargo delivery or harvesting the mechanical energy of chaotic motion.

(...)

In this focus issue we have tried to assemble papers from leading experts which we hope will provide a current snapshot of this young and rapidly expanding field of research. They cover both theoretical and experimental investigations of the dynamics of active matter on different spatial and temporal scales.

 

Focus on Swarming in Biological and Related Systems
Lev Tsimring, Hugues Chate, Igor Aronson

2014 New J. Phys. 16

http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/focus/Focus%20on%20Swarming%20in%20Biological%20and%20Related%20Systems


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Creativity, like evolution, is merely a series of thefts

Creativity, like evolution, is merely a series of thefts | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it
We can blame evolution for making us little more than the glorified karaoke singers we are. Or as Voltaire put it: "originality is nothing but judicious imitation"

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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 15, 1:02 PM

It's all one built upon the other.


What I've been proposing for government is not going to alter the base goals of the political leaders.  In fact, I think it's going to improve their chances of being elected until death, if they follow it correctly, and ultimately preserve our social institutions until the eventual end of the species and, if our descendents are still around, beyond that.

 

What I'm observing, as a political and social scientist, is that through benevolently motivated, effectively sensed and executed policy for the sake of the other in the society, that governments tend to be able to last longer, be more legitimate in the eyes of the public and, ultimately, get carried on, with its members, throughout the generations.

 

Some people simply do not and will not have what it takes to act as these effective, benevolent and empirically grounded leaders, regardless of party affiliation and label.  That is how, I think, our current institutions are failing, because we've populated these political systems with people who don't care, won't care and/or don't have the sense to act for the effective sake of the other for their own sakes.  It's in our legislative systems as well as our administrative systems.  It's killing themselves as much as it's killing our people.  And it's just a brain type who doesn't get the concept of working with others, rather than over or against them.

 

Think about it.

Arjen ten Have's curator insight, March 18, 9:08 AM

Basic but nice essay on how objects of use, creativity and biological evolution are all hung up on the same principles: Hey this works better, what if I combine it with that?

Costas Bouyioukos's curator insight, March 18, 1:40 PM

Mark Pagel writes about our "ability" to innovate.

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Info-computational Constructivism and Cognition

Context: At present, we lack a common understanding of both the process of cognition in living organisms and the construction of knowledge in embodied, embedded cognizing agents in general, including future artifactual cognitive agents under development, such as cognitive robots and softbots. Purpose: This paper aims to show how the info-computational approach (IC) can reinforce constructivist ideas about the nature of cognition and knowledge and, conversely, how constructivist insights (such as that the process of cognition is the process of life) can inspire new models of computing. Method: The info-computational constructive framework is presented for the modeling of cognitive processes in cognizing agents. Parallels are drawn with other constructivist approaches to cognition and knowledge generation. We describe how cognition as a process of life itself functions based on info-computation and how the process of knowledge generation proceeds through interactions with the environment and among agents. Results: Cognition and knowledge generation in a cognizing agent is understood as interaction with the world (potential information), which by processes of natural computation becomes actual information. That actual information after integration becomes knowledge for the agent. Heinz von Foerster is identified as a precursor of natural computing, in particular bio computing. Implications: IC provides a framework for unified study of cognition in living organisms (from the simplest ones, such as bacteria, to the most complex ones) as well as in artifactual cognitive systems. Constructivist content: It supports the constructivist view that knowledge is actively constructed by cognizing agents and shared in a process of social cognition. IC argues that this process can be modeled as info-computation.

 

Info-computational Constructivism and Cognition
Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic

Constructivist Foundations Volume 9 · Number 2 · Pages 223–231

http://www.univie.ac.at/constructivism/journal/9/2/223.dodig


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Connecting Paradigms

The New Science of Cities presents a herculean attempt to bring together widely fragmented approaches to making sense of human social organization with the goal of eventually establishing a consolidated “science of cities” able to answer our questions. Michael Batty bases his argument on the interplay among space, dynamics, and relations. He holds that “to understand place, we must understand flows, and to understand flows we must understand networks.” Batty (a geographer at University College London) also stresses two other principles: an intrinsic order of scale determines a city's form and function, and a science of cities should not merely observe but also predict. The book draws on the work of urbanists, economists, mathematicians, and physicists as well as almost five decades of his own contributions to urban studies.

 

Connecting Paradigms
. Michael Szell


Science 28 February 2014: 

Vol. 343 no. 6174 pp. 970-971
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1249599

 

The New Science of Cities by Michael Batty MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2013. 518 pp. $45, £31.95. ISBN 9780262019521. http://tinyurl.com/kgqugb5


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Complexity Explorer -- Resources

The Resources section contains annotated links to a wide variety of web-based resources related to complex systems. These include journals, conferences, tutorials, software, videos, among other types of resources that will be useful for all levels of interest.


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Customer Loyalty Optimization: Bayesian Networks

Customer Loyalty Optimization: Bayesian Networks | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

This tutorial illustrates an innovative market research workflow for deriving marketing and product planning priorities from auto buyer surveys. In this study, we utilize the Strategic Vision New Vehicle Experience Survey, which includes, among many other items, customers’ satisfaction ratings with regard to over 100 individual product attributes.


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How can linear equations, no matter how complicated, demonstrate complexity?

 

the website has some interesting white papers such as http://bayesia.us/assets/bayesian_networks_intro_v17.pdf

 

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Remaking the industrial economy

Remaking the industrial economy | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

Visualize, for a moment, the industrial economy as a massive system of conveyor belts—one that directs materials and energy from resource-rich countries to manufacturing powerhouses, such as China, and then spirits the resulting products onward to the United States, Europe, and other destinations, where they are used, discarded, and replaced. While this image is an exaggeration, it does capture the essence of the linear, one-way production model that has dominated global manufacturing since the onset of the Industrial Revolution.

 

http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/manufacturing/remaking_the_industrial_economy


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Evolution, You’re Drunk

Evolution, You’re Drunk | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

Amoebas are puny, stupid blobs, so scientists were surprised to learn that they contain 200 times more DNA than Einstein did. Because amoebas are made of just one cell, researchers assumed they would be simpler than humans genetically. Plus, amoebas date back farther in time than humans, and simplicity is considered an attribute of primitive beings. It just didn’t make sense.

The idea of directionality in nature, a gradient from simple to complex, began with the Greeks, who called nature physis, meaning growth. That idea subtly extended from changes over an organism’s lifetime, to changes over evolutionary time after Charles Darwin argued that all animals descend from a single common ancestor. When his contemporaries drew evolutionary trees of life, they assumed increasing complexity. Worms originated early in animal evolution.  Creatures with more complex structures originated later. Biologists tweaked evolutionary trees over the following century, but generally, simple organisms continued to precede the complex.

 

http://nautil.us/issue/9/time/evolution-youre-drunk


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Nonlinear Dynamics Analysis of a Self-Organizing Recurrent Neural Network: Chaos Waning

Nonlinear Dynamics Analysis of a Self-Organizing Recurrent Neural Network: Chaos Waning | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

Self-organization is thought to play an important role in structuring nervous systems. It frequently arises as a consequence of plasticity mechanisms in neural networks: connectivity determines network dynamics which in turn feed back on network structure through various forms of plasticity. Recently, self-organizing recurrent neural network models (SORNs) have been shown to learn non-trivial structure in their inputs and to reproduce the experimentally observed statistics and fluctuations of synaptic connection strengths in cortex and hippocampus. However, the dynamics in these networks and how they change with network evolution are still poorly understood. Here we investigate the degree of chaos in SORNs by studying how the networks' self-organization changes their response to small perturbations. We study the effect of perturbations to the excitatory-to-excitatory weight matrix on connection strengths and on unit activities. We find that the network dynamics, characterized by an estimate of the maximum Lyapunov exponent, becomes less chaotic during its self-organization, developing into a regime where only few perturbations become amplified. We also find that due to the mixing of discrete and (quasi-)continuous variables in SORNs, small perturbations to the synaptic weights may become amplified only after a substantial delay, a phenomenon we propose to call deferred chaos.

 

Eser J, Zheng P, Triesch J (2014) Nonlinear Dynamics Analysis of a Self-Organizing Recurrent Neural Network: Chaos Waning. PLoS ONE 9(1): e86962. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0086962

http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0086962

 

 


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Crisis Responses and Crisis Management: what can we learn from Biological Networks?

The generality of network properties allows the utilization of the ‘wisdom’ of biological systems surviving crisis events for many millions of years. Yeast protein-protein interaction network shows a decrease in community-overlap (an increase in community cohesion) in stress. Community rearrangement seems to be a cost-efficient, general crisis-management response of complex systems. Inter-community bridges, such as the highly dynamic ‘creative nodes’ emerge as crucial determinants helping crisis survival.

 

Crisis Responses and Crisis Management: what can we learn from Biological Networks?
Péter Csermely, Agoston Mihalik, Zsolt Vassy, András London

Systema: connecting matter, life, culture and technology

Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

http://www.systema-journal.org/article/view/115 ;


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Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 13, 10:46 AM

Love the insights generated by looking at existing systems and how one could apply or learn from how they function in a different context - rich with insight and ideas.

Eli Levine's curator insight, April 13, 6:54 PM

Interesting.

 

Check it out.

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Dan Ariely on ‘The Honest Truth About Dishonesty’

Dan Ariely on ‘The Honest Truth About Dishonesty’ | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it

Everyone cheats a little from time to time. But most major betrayals within organizations – from accounting fraud to doping in sports – start with a first step that crosses the line, according to Dan Ariely, a leading behavioral economist at Duke and author of The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone – Especially Ourselves. That step can start people on a “slippery slope.” In this interview with Wharton management professor Adam Grant, Ariely helps leaders understand how to prevent people from taking that first step, how to create a code of conduct that makes rules and expectations clear and why good rules are critical to organizations.


http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/dan-ariely-dishonestys-slippery-slope/


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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 11, 1:15 PM

This is troubling to me, mainly because I know how easily I could fall victim to a potential slippery slope series of events that turns me from one side to another.  I'm just being honest about it.  There's no real reason yet to differentiate me from Nancy Botwin, who goes from a surburban widow to a major queen pin in the drug trade (besides the fact that I'm not likely to deal drugs).  Am I seriously one of the few human beings who will question him/herself with regards to their own integrity?

 

I don't know.

 

But if this research is accurate, it's bound to be something that's near universal for our species.  That means that you and I are effected by it, whether we like or admit it or not.

 

Sad and scary.

 

Think about it.

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The Simple Rules of Social Contagion

It is commonly believed that information spreads between individuals like a pathogen, with each exposure by an informed friend potentially resulting in a naive individual becoming infected. However, empirical studies of social media suggest that individual response to repeated exposure to information is far more complex. As a proxy for intervention experiments, we compare user responses to multiple exposures on two different social media sites, Twitter and Digg. We show that the position of exposing messages on the user-interface strongly affects social contagion. Accounting for this visibility significantly simplifies the dynamics of social contagion. The likelihood an individual will spread information increases monotonically with exposure, while explicit feedback about how many friends have previously spread it increases the likelihood of a response. We provide a framework for unifying information visibility, divided attention, and explicit social feedback to predict the temporal dynamics of user behavior.

 

The Simple Rules of Social Contagion
Nathan O. Hodas & Kristina Lerman

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 4343 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep04343


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The Ecology of Collective Behavior

Similar patterns of interaction, such as network motifs and feedback loops, are used in many natural collective processes, probably because they have evolved independently under similar pressures. Here I consider how three environmental constraints may shape the evolution of collective behavior: the patchiness of resources, the operating costs of maintaining the interaction network that produces collective behavior, and the threat of rupture of the network. The ants are a large and successful taxon that have evolved in very diverse environments. Examples from ants provide a starting point for examining more generally the fit between the particular pattern of interaction that regulates activity, and the environment in which it functions.

 

Gordon DM (2014) The Ecology of Collective Behavior. PLoS Biol 12(3): e1001805. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001805

 


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Do-It-Yourself Urban Design: The Social Practice of Informal “Improvement” Through Unauthorized Alteration

There are numerous ways in which people make illegal or unauthorized alterations to urban space. This study identifies and analyzes one that has been largely ignored in social science: explicitly functional and civic-minded informal contributions that I call “do-it-yourself urban design.” The research, which began as an investigation into more “traditional” nonpermissable alterations, uncovered these cases—from homemade bike lanes and street signs to guerrilla gardens and development proposals—that are gaining visibility in many cities, yet are poorly accounted for by existing perspectives in the literature. This article examines the existing theories and evidence from interviews and other fieldwork in 14 cities in order to develop the new analytical category of DIY urban design. I present findings on the creators of these interventions, on their motivations to “improve” the built environment where they perceive government and other development actors to be failing, and on the concentration of their efforts in gentrifying areas. This introduces the possibility of conflict and complicates their impact. I argue that DIY urban design has wide-ranging implications for both local communities and broader urban policy.

 

Do-It-Yourself Urban Design: The Social Practice of Informal “Improvement” Through Unauthorized Alteration
. Gordon C. C. Douglas

City & Community

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cico.12029


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Molly Martin's curator insight, March 17, 4:55 AM

An interesting read for anyone curious as to how individuals and indie community  organizers rework local infrastructures.

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Simplicity amid Complexity

We live in interesting times as we watch diverse effects of human activities on Earth's climate emerge from natural variability. In predicting the outcome of this evolving inadvertent experiment, climate science faces many challenges, some of which have been outlined in this series of Science Perspectives (1–6): reducing the uncertainty in climate sensitivity; explaining the recent slowdown in the rate of warming and its implications for understanding internal variability; uncovering the factors that control how and where the land will become drier as it warms; quantifying the cooling due to anthropogenic aerosols; explaining the curious evolution of atmospheric methane; and predicting changes in extreme weather. In addition to these challenges, the turbulent and chaotic atmospheric and oceanic flows seemingly limit predictability on various time scales. Is the climate system just too complex for useful prediction?

 

Simplicity amid Complexity
Isaac Held

Science 14 March 2014:
Vol. 343 no. 6176 pp. 1206-1207
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1248447


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Questioning Life and Cognition: Some Foundational Issues in the Paradigm of Enaction

John Stewart's book is a life achievement. It looks at three foundational issues for Enaction envisaged as a tenable paradigm for Cognitive Science: at first, the question of a “missing link” between the first living organisms – which, logically, have been dissipative structures simple enough to arise by spontaneous generation – and the simplest extant organisms that exhibit too complex a DNA-based genetic system to have arisen in that way; secondly, a relatively specific area with the cardinal virtue of being open to empirical refutation, i.e. the primitive immune system of vertebrates. Finally, the author tackles the social dimension of human cognition, presenting some of the basic concepts of sociology that typically need to be integrated into a potential paradigm of Enaction.

 

http://www.enactionseries.com/library/bookjs/co/Original_book_JS.html


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The Math That Predicted the Revolutions Sweeping the Globe Right Now

The Math That Predicted the Revolutions Sweeping the Globe Right Now | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it
The complex systems theorists who predicted the Arab Spring built a model that predicted the unrest in Ukraine, Venezuela, and Thailand too.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 23, 1:02 PM

I wonder if they're saying anything about the United States or Western Europe.

 

Something wicked this way comes.

 

And, when people are going to literally start to starve, it'll be very interesting to see what happens next.

 

Think about it.

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▶ Chaos, Complexity, and Public Policy

Irene Sanders Executive Director and Founder of the Washington Center for Complexity and Public Policy and author of "Strategic Thinking and the New Science: Planning in the Midst of Chaos, Complexity, and Change."

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXxs-JtvkkQ


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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 11, 2:09 PM

A way cool panel discussion.  I wish I could be a full practitioner of this new, empirically based governing and political strategic thinking.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 12, 10:34 AM

Loving these new video resources for understanding complexity and it applications.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 23, 9:16 PM

are our politicians aware of these concepts?

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Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts (by Stanislas Dehaene)

Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts

~ Stanislas Dehaene (author) More about this product
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How does our brain generate a conscious thought? And why does so much of our knowledge remain unconscious? Thanks to clever psychological and brain-imaging experiments, scientists are closer to cracking this mystery than ever before.

In this lively book, Stanislas Dehaene describes the pioneering work his lab and the labs of other cognitive neuroscientists worldwide have accomplished in defining, testing, and explaining the brain events behind a conscious state. We can now pin down the neurons that fire when a person reports becoming aware of a piece of information and understand the crucial role unconscious computations play in how we make decisions. The emerging theory enables a test of consciousness in animals, babies, and those with severe brain injuries.

A joyous exploration of the mind and its thrilling complexities, Consciousness and the Brain will excite anyone interested
in cutting-edge science and technology and the vast philosophical, personal, and ethical implications of finally quantifying
consciousness.


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How do life, economy and other complex systems escape the heat death?

The primordial confrontation underlying the existence of our universe can be conceived as the battle between entropy and complexity. The law of ever-increasing entropy (Boltzmann H-theorem) evokes an irreversible, one-directional evolution (or rather involution) going uniformly and monotonically from birth to death. Since the 19th century, this concept is one of the cornerstones and in the same time puzzles of statistical mechanics. On the other hand, there is the empirical experience where one witnesses the emergence, growth and diversification of new self-organized objects with ever-increasing complexity. When modeling them in terms of simple discrete elements one finds that the emergence of collective complex adaptive objects is a rather generic phenomenon governed by a new type of laws. These 'emergence' laws, not connected directly with the fundamental laws of the physical reality, nor acting 'in addition' to them but acting through them were called by Phil Anderson 'More is Different', 'das Maass' by Hegel etc. Even though the 'emergence laws' act through the intermediary of the fundamental laws that govern the individual elementary agents, it turns out that different systems apparently governed by very different fundamental laws: gravity, chemistry, biology, economics, social psychology, end up often with similar emergence laws and outcomes. In particular the emergence of adaptive collective objects endows the system with a granular structure which in turn causes specific macroscopic cycles of intermittent fluctuations.

 

How do life, economy and other complex systems escape the heat death?
Sorin Solomon, Natasa Golo

http://arxiv.org/abs/1402.0153


Via Complexity Digest
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Ricardo Hausmann proposes an alternative approach to economic development based on how the human brain functions

Ricardo Hausmann proposes an alternative approach to economic development based on how the human brain functions | operationalizing complexity | Scoop.it
The human brain makes predictions by finding similarities between the patterns in recent sensory inputs and previous experiences stored in its vast memory. The same process is now perfectly feasible for those engaged in promoting economic development.

Via NESS, Complexity Digest
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