Operant Conditioning
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Positive Reinforcement For Kids

Positive Reinforcement For Kids | Operant Conditioning | Scoop.it
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This article talks about how if you give children positive reinforcement they will be able to succeed in life. This technique has proven effective for parents, teachers, coaches, leaders, and anyone responsible for a child or group of children. The fact that it does not use pain, punishment, intimidation, yelling, humiliation, shame, guilt or other things that can hurt the child.Treating a child with positive reinforcement will not only help them succeed but help any caretaker succeed in helping that child grow as a human being. 

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B.F. Skinner | Operant Conditioning - Simply Psychology

B.F. Skinner | Operant Conditioning - Simply Psychology | Operant Conditioning | Scoop.it
Skinner believed that the best way to understand behavior is to look at the causes of an action and its consequences. He called this approach operant conditioning.
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Punishment is defined as the opposite of reinforcement since it is designed to weaken or eliminate a response rather than increase it. Similar to reinforcement, punishment can work by applying a bad stimulus like a shock or physical abuse after a response. Or by removing a potentially rewarding stimulus. For instance, deducting someone’s  money to punish undesirable behavior.

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Types of Operant Conditioning

Types of Operant Conditioning | Operant Conditioning | Scoop.it
There are four types of Operant Conditioning: positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, punishment and extinction.
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This article talks about what Positive reinforcement is. Positive reinforcement occurs when a behavior is strengthened as a result of receiving a positive condition. Positive reinforcement for example is where a person lifts a finger. The dog eventually sits. The dog gets fed. In time, even beginning to lift a finger leads to the dog sitting. This occurs to us every day whether we know it or not.

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Operant Conditioning | Education.com

Information on education and child development for parents and educators. ASSUMPTIONS RELATED TO LEARNING VARIATIONS OF THE MODEL COMPONENTS AND ...
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This article talks about how school systems use operant conditioning to shape & teach the children. They appear in the forms of (a) consumable (ex., candy), social (ex., praise), (b) activity (ex., time on the computer), (c) exchangeable (ex., points or stickers), and (d) tangible (ex., getting to sit in one's favorite chair). The teachers then have to decide whether or not which reinforcement schedules they are going to use; fixed ratio, fixed interval, variable ratio, and variable interval.

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Extinction (psychology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Extinction is observed in both operantly conditioned and classically conditioned behavior. When operant behavior that has been previously reinforced no longer produces reinforcing consequences the behavior gradually stops occurring.[1] In classical conditioning, when a conditioned stimulus is presented alone, so that it no longer predicts the coming of the unconditioned stimulus, conditioned responding gradually stops. (For example, after Pavlov's dog was conditioned to salivate at the sound of a bell, it eventually stopped salivating to the bell after the bell had been sounded repeatedly but no food came.)

Extinction is typically studied within the Pavlovian fear conditioning framework in which extinction refers to the reduction in a conditioned response (CR; e.g., fear response/freezing) when a conditioned stimulus (CS; e.g., neutral stimulus/light or tone) is repeatedly presented in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus (US; e.g., foot shock/loud noise) with which it has been previously paired.

The simplest explanation of extinction is that as the CS is presented without the aversive US, the animal gradually "unlearns" the CS–US association which is known as the associative loss theory. However, this explanation is complicated by observations where there is some fear restoration, such as reinstatement (restoration of CR in the context where extinction training occurred but not a different context after aversive US is presented again), renewal (restoration of CR in context A but not in B when learning occurred in context A and extinction in context B), and spontaneous recovery (restoration of CR when the retention test occurs after a long but not a short delay after extinction training) and alternative explanations have been offered.[2]

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This article talks about how extinction is involved in operant conditioning and how it works. Extinction occurs when a behavior is weakened as a result of not experiencing an expected positive condition or a negative condition is stopped. For example, when a child screams to get attention and they are ignored. The behavior gets extinct because the child has learned that the screaming will do no good. B. F skinner believed that extinction was a learned behavior which is why he thought it belonged with both Classical and Operant conditioning.

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What Is Negative Reinforcement

What Is Negative Reinforcement | Operant Conditioning | Scoop.it
Negative reinforcement is another technique used in operant conditioning used to increase the likelihood that behaviors will occur. Learn more about what negative reinforcement is, how it works and how it differs from punishment.
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This article talks about what Negative Reinforcement is and how it applies to our everyday lives.  Negative reinforcement happens when a behavior is strengthened as a result of stopping or avoiding a negative condition. An example of Negative reinforcement could be having a headache and take a pain reliever to get rid of the pain. An easier way to think of it is this example,  Z happens ==> Feel bad ==> do X ==> Z happens less ==> Feel better ==> When Z happens, Do X.

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Why Is Operant Conditioning Useful in the Workplace?

Why Is Operant Conditioning Useful in the Workplace? | Operant Conditioning | Scoop.it
Operant conditioning is a behavioral theory created by famed psychologist B.F. Skinner that suggests that behavior is most easily modified when it produces a negative consequence. This theory can be ...
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This article talks about how using operant conditioning can affect the enviroment in the workplace. An example of why it helps is, a worker does well at a certain job and helps the company, they can get a potential raise. This leads to the continued behavior in order to keep that raise. Another area operant conditioning deals with in the workplace is teamwork. If a group is doing a project and one member fails to get their part of the project done then whole group suffers. So you condition your workers to make sure they suceed and complete the project on time.

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