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Crap Detection for Social Content Curators: How To Verify What You Post

Accuracy is fundamental to journalism, but it’s a challenge to verify information when it flows at digital warp speed from so many sources. This presentation

Via Robin Good
PaigeCuffe's insight:

Within open practice one of the fears and pitfalls is verification of the information and/or the source of the information you are tapping into.  We're going to make mistakes, even the great and the good misquote or show a little bias, but this is a useful resource to minimise slips.  Filled with reminders and discoveries for challenging and verifying information sources in social media with useful links to tools to help.

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Jo Paoletti's comment, May 9, 2013 7:19 AM
Crap detection for content curators. Is it time for everyone who shares stuff they find on the Internet to think of themselves as content curators. Beats being a rumor monger or Typhoid Mary of misinformation.
Sarah McElrath's curator insight, May 10, 2013 8:14 AM

Could be used when teaching evaluation of online content / critical thinking skills.

Ruveanna Hambrick's curator insight, October 2, 10:30 AM

This is a good source for knowing how to "crap detect" not only for news websites and blog posts but also for social media claims as well.

From around the web

Openness and H817
Interesting snippets and articles around the topics studied in H817 - supporting critical thinking
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Rescooped by PaigeCuffe from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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Who Does What in a Massive Open Online Course? | Seaton et al. , Comm. of the ACM

Who Does What in a Massive Open Online Course? | Seaton et al. , Comm. of the ACM | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) collect valuable data on student learning behavior; essentially complete records of al student interactions in a self-contained learning environment, with the benefit of large sample sizes. […] 

• […] 76% of all participants were browsers who collectively accounted for only 8% of time spent in the course, whereas, the 7% certificate-earning participants averaged 100 hours each and collectively accounted for 60% of total time. 

• Students spent the most time per week interacting with lecture videos and homework, followed by discussion forums and online laboratories;


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, April 21, 3:46 PM

The article analyses the behaviour of some 150,000 registrants for the inaugural edX course — 6.002x: Circuits and Electronics, which was offered in the spring of 2012. The analysis is based on the log files for the course, constituting an exemplary case of the application of learning analytics in action (although the authors don’t use that term at all). It consists of two parts. First, the authors take the data of all registrants into account, later to focus on those relatively few (about 10,000) who managed to earn a course certificate. 

 

Overall, this is an interesting and useful study. I have two minor qualms with it. First, the analysis focuses on those registrants who passed the exam and earned a certificate. Although the 10,000 students who managed to do this is a sizable number, it pales with the 150,000 who registred in the first place. Second, and as far as I am concerned more importantly, no attempts is made to frame the discussion in the context of a particular learning theory. However, these qualms do not detract from the value of this study, it deserves to be widely read, particularly by people who are engaged in learning analytics (who might miss it as that term is not used). @pbsloep

(see for a more extensive discussion of the article my blog post at http://pbsloep.blogspot.nl/2014/04/who-does-what-in-massive-open-online.html

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Investigating MOOCs through blog mining | Yong Chen | The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning

Investigating MOOCs through blog mining | Yong Chen | The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it

Abstract: MOOCs (massive open online course) is a disruptive innovation and a current buzzword in higher education. However, the discussion of MOOCs is disparate, fragmented, and distributed among different outlets. Systematic, extensively published research on MOOCs is unavailable. This paper adopts a novel method called blog mining to analyze MOOCs. The findings indicate, while MOOCs have benefitted learners, providers, and faculty who develop and teach MOOCs, challenges still exist, such as questionable course quality, high dropout rate, unavailable course credits, ineffective assessments, complex copyright, and limited hardware. Future research should explore the position of MOOCs and how it can be sustained.


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, May 2, 8:53 AM

The introduction to the article sometimes paints perhaps too simplistic a picture (such as that the xMOOCs and cMOOCs exhaust the universe of possible MOOCs; cf my recent scoop in early March: http://sco.lt/8FAEJl) or a somewhat trite one (“MOOCs represents an emerging methodology of online teaching and an important development in open education.”). Still the article is an interesting contribution to  MOOC research for the methodology it employs: text mining and analysis of blogs on MOOCs. Language technologies - in this case concept analysis and mapping using leximancer - are a powerful means to crunch large amounts of textual data, often revealing patters that are not immediately apparent to the naked eye. The value of the article therefore does not lie in its introduction, but in the results and ensuing discussion. 

 

Chen summarises the results under the headings of benefits for learners, benefits for providers, and trends, concluding with a discussion of the limitations of his study. His conclusions are not earth shattering, but how could they? After all, this is a mere summary of what he came across in the 360 blog posts he analysed with the help of leximancer; it is not a position paper in any sense, at best it is a kind of meta-analysis. To put it differently, tongue in cheek, there’s no need to go through the 431 scoops I collected on these pages to get an impression of what has been discussed about MOOCs in blogs over the last 4 odd years. Read the article and you have a fair idea. And then you should go to individual blog posts to collect opinions. @pbsloep

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Crap Detection for Social Content Curators: How To Verify What You Post

Accuracy is fundamental to journalism, but it’s a challenge to verify information when it flows at digital warp speed from so many sources. This presentation

Via Robin Good
PaigeCuffe's insight:

Within open practice one of the fears and pitfalls is verification of the information and/or the source of the information you are tapping into.  We're going to make mistakes, even the great and the good misquote or show a little bias, but this is a useful resource to minimise slips.  Filled with reminders and discoveries for challenging and verifying information sources in social media with useful links to tools to help.

more...
Jo Paoletti's comment, May 9, 2013 7:19 AM
Crap detection for content curators. Is it time for everyone who shares stuff they find on the Internet to think of themselves as content curators. Beats being a rumor monger or Typhoid Mary of misinformation.
Sarah McElrath's curator insight, May 10, 2013 8:14 AM

Could be used when teaching evaluation of online content / critical thinking skills.

Ruveanna Hambrick's curator insight, October 2, 10:30 AM

This is a good source for knowing how to "crap detect" not only for news websites and blog posts but also for social media claims as well.

Rescooped by PaigeCuffe from Digital Analog Learning Cultures
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Beaven, Tita: Qualitative methods for researching teachers’ (re)use of OER

Beaven, Tita: Qualitative methods for researching teachers’ (re)use of OER | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it

This paper proposes variations around the themes of Peer Observation of Teaching and Professional Conversations as tools to investigate the use and reuse of OER by teachers. It reports on two qualitative studies on the use and reuse of OER by language teachers at the Open University UK. Teachers use LORO (loro.open.ac.uk), an open repository of OER for language teaching, to select their teaching resources.


Via Andreas Link, Ann Hulton
PaigeCuffe's insight:

In the discussion around how to increase the use of OER, this is one to throw into the pot.

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CTecnologìa's curator insight, April 15, 2013 1:46 PM

la usabilidad es uno de los elementos más importantes a la hora de considerar los rea

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For Scientists, an Exploding World of Pseudo-Academia

For Scientists, an Exploding World of Pseudo-Academia | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
The number of fake journals and conferences has soared as scientific publishing has shifted from a traditional business model to open access on the Internet.
PaigeCuffe's insight:

"The dark side of open" is used in this article to describe the phenomenon of 'fake' journals made more possible by a world of open publishing.  As credible scientists have not been immune, this illustrates a possible danger of not maintaining a peer review process of some sort.  It might raise a question about the need for specialist digital literacy training.  Do even seasoned professionals need assistance with developing the 'crap detection' skills needed in literature research in a world awash with opinions? ,

Separately, could this phenomena, rather than 'democratising' scientific publishing, result in entrenchment of current publishing institutions and power if we are left floundering in a sea of available journals but a time-consuming search to find credible papers?

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@Ignatia Webs

@Ignatia Webs | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
PaigeCuffe's insight:

Seemingly simple, these are crucial points to strive for in open course design, especially in MOOCs.  The design elements could be the first points on a

briefing sheet to the tech team...

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Who owns the content and data produced in schools? | A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education

Who owns the content and data produced in schools? | A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
PaigeCuffe's insight:

Although primarily looking at teaching content generated in schools, this blog raises questions for practitioners at all levels regarding ownership of their lesson plans and designs and the right to share openly/sell this work.  Is this a discussion we need to be formally raising with colleagues and bosses? Are their teachers who want to share openly who are being prevented by their employers from doing so?

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Creative Commons and open access to scholarly works: common myths about an imperfect match

Creative Commons and open access to scholarly works: common myths about an imperfect match | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
Adequate licensing and attribution of scholarly work in the digital age have presented many issues for scholarly and publishing communities. While many open access advocates consider Creative Commo...
PaigeCuffe's insight:

CC-BY or not to CC-BY?  That is only one of many questions plaguing not only institutions, but individual contributors to knowledge.  This article helps to clarify what the various Creative Commons licences signify and their possible implications and unexpected consequences. 

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Open Access (7th March 2013)

PaigeCuffe's insight:

 From the current gathering of evidence by the UK parliament around the adoption of 'gold' open access versus 'green' open access, this is from Stephen Curry.  This submission gives pause for thought about whether the ultimate solution is implementable without global consensus and the possible cost to the UK HE sector. (thanks to Seb Schmoller for the tweet that sent me here)

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Peter Suber, Open Access Overview (definition, introduction)

PaigeCuffe's insight:

Comprehensive, detailed, all in one place summary of the terms, concepts and questions of Open Access policies.  Authoritative explanation of key terms - that are often misunderstood - is given here.

Endless links for further reading, but note last revised Dec 2012.

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Peter Suber - Google+ - Major new bill mandating open access introduced in Congress…

Peter Suber - Google+ - Major new bill mandating open access introduced in Congress… | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
Major new bill mandating open access introduced in Congress

A new bill mandating OA to federally-funded research was just introduced into both houses of…
PaigeCuffe's insight:

For non-US readers you might want to skip the acronym-laden beginning!  The bullet points midway through give a clear listing of the open access bill introduced into Congress.  Of interest from a UK perspective is the fact that they are seeking 'green open access' rather than the 'gold open access' being advocated in the UK.  The prime difference between them is succinctly noted in the bullet points.

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Out With the Degree, In With the Badge: How Badges Motivate Learning And 7 Tips To Use It Right - InformED

Out With the Degree, In With the Badge: How Badges Motivate Learning And 7 Tips To Use It Right - InformED | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it

Via Colin Warren, Rose Heaney, ChrisPegler
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Colin Warren's curator insight, August 30, 2013 7:49 AM

A useful summary on the development/s in digital badge with sound advice for those interested in getting on board.

Bill Brown's curator insight, February 19, 1:04 PM

Is this the future reward available from MOOCS?

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Curating Content for a WordPress Blog (How I Do It)

PaigeCuffe's insight:

forgot who steered me to this - pity as I owe them thanks!

Lengthy but leads through the logic of why this approach is necessary and then gives very practical step by step tips and suggestions.  The criticism of curation as offten merely an aggregation is valid (she says, scooping it...!) and it is perhaps time for pointers for taking it to the 'next level' for even casual would-be curators.  I'll be working through this. Repeatedly.

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Rescooped by PaigeCuffe from Initiate! What is learning design?
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Interaction Possibilities in #MOOCs – How Do They Actually Happen?

Publication at 3rd International Conference on Higher Education Development "Future Visions for Higher Education Development"

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Peter Bryant
PaigeCuffe's insight:

This draft paper offers some evidence of the style of some interactions on some types of MOOCs.  Regrettably, it offers them as though representing all interactions and all types of MOOCs and does not recognise the differences in pedagogy/heutagogy of the widely varying courses now available.  Indeed, it does not describe the original cMOOCs though it does draw on a lot of the literature which has arisen from and around cMOOCs and applies this without qualification to xMOOCs. 

Within those constraints, however, is there something here to consider about the style of interaction of participants on these xMOOCs and also the potential role of xMOOCs in other societies?

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timokos's curator insight, April 17, 2013 9:43 AM

And a non-western vision on the interactive possiblities of MOOCs

KenzWun's curator insight, June 27, 2013 8:10 AM

From this draft paper, i can see some evidence of the style of some interactions on some types of MOOCs.  Regrettably, it offers them as though representing all interactions and all types of MOOCs and does not recognise the differences in pedagogy/heutagogy of the widely varying courses now available.  Indeed, it does not describe the original cMOOCs though it does draw on a lot of the literature which has arisen from and around MOOCs and applies this without qualification to MOOCs. Within those constraints, however, is there something here to consider about the style of interaction of participants on these MOOCs

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Will Open-Access Publishing Break the Darwinist Stranglehold?

Will Open-Access Publishing Break the Darwinist Stranglehold? | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
Health Impact News Editor Comments: Not only could open access (Will Open-Access Publishing Break the Darwinist Stranglehold?
PaigeCuffe's insight:

I've scooped this only as a contrast to the other article scooped today.  See what you think. 

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Open Standards Can Change Everything

Open Standards Can Change Everything | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
PaigeCuffe's insight:

A quick but provoking question is essentially posed here: Can we achieve truly 'Open' without open standards?

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Patricia Daniels's curator insight, April 5, 2013 5:16 AM

Whether open standards are the solution or not I feel it's a step in the right direction to taking some of the complexity out of the system we have at the moment. 

 

 

PaigeCuffe's comment, April 8, 2013 2:41 AM
Yes, certainly we unconsciously rely on open standards already, perhaps increased awareness might bring some user pressure to this question. I'm wondering if we shouldn't be swinging the questio round and asking "Why not open standards?". By refocussing the assumed position to 'open' we can identify issues with that and work through them.
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If MOOCs Have Limitations, How About MORCs?

If MOOCs Have Limitations, How About MORCs? | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
 The recent emergence of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) has sparked agitation in the academia especially in Western Europe and North America. Constraints raised by MOOCs vary depending on prof...
PaigeCuffe's insight:

The title says MOOCs but the blog says a lot more!  A reminder that massive and open are not new.  Bernard suggsts some of the old models to achieve the first two points in the MOOC acronym might be tweaked and re-deployed to broaden accessibility.

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OER terminology

OER terminology | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
RT @allisonl: Want to know more about #OER ? Here is a useful guide http://t.co/dySXiABfYs Created by @loumgill @isobelf @helenbeetham @allisonl
PaigeCuffe's insight:

Essential tool for those getting to grips with the oer jargon!

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Open Access (7th March 2013)

PaigeCuffe's insight:

Another submission to the UK parliament on the topic of 'green or gold' open access:  Any blunter in its criticisms of the Finch report and it would be impolite.  A passionate argument for the needs of small to medium enterprises (SME) as regards choice of open access (OA) policy. 

Note: NIH is the National Institute for Health in the UK

BIS is the government department for Business, Innovation and Skills

The Finch Report is a study commissioned by the UK government on how to make access to results of taxpayer-funded scientific research free of charge, without compromising on researching and reporting standards.

(Again, thanks to @sebschmoller for the tweet about this)

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Analysis of funder Open Access policies around the world « SPARC Europe

Analysis of funder Open Access policies around the world « SPARC Europe | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
PaigeCuffe's insight:

Useful as a guide to the current state of play, the use of only the roarmap creates a less than complete picture.  Obvious ommissions include, for example, South Africa's institution-level policies

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/portals-and-platforms/goap/access-by-region/africa/south-africa/

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Key Questions for Open Access Policy in the UK

Key Questions for Open Access Policy in the UK | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
While recent policy developments have made huge strides for open access publishing, there is still great uncertainty over how the transition will play out. Stephen Curry distills the key questions ...
PaigeCuffe's insight:

From September last year, this summary is of the views and commentary of leading open access researchers and writers on the adoption of the open access policy announced by UK Research Councils in 2012.  Gives an overview of how the discussion has shifted from the push for open access funding policies to arguments around the details of such a policy.   Influences and tensions in the debate are noted.  The author is a research scientist.

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Times Higher Education - Fools' gold?

Times Higher Education - Fools' gold? | Openness and H817 | Scoop.it
PaigeCuffe's insight:

This is useful as an outline of how we got from there to here on open access arguments.  It sketches out concerns about the UK's current position.  Issues that still need to be considered - such as how 'gold' access costs to the researcher will limit how often they can publish, what and how they publish - are raised. (though note other scoops for clarification on the point of 'researcher-pays in gold access').  It's argued that there is a possible difference in effect on poorly -funded researchers compared to well-funded researchers and that this could entrench disparities in position that are not due to academic excellence. The concern discussed is that those not well known, still getting established, undertaking less popular research, at less well funded institutions or in disciplines attracting lower funding may be discriminated against. 

 

What is not often heard in discussions on open access is possible negatives to the unrestricted reuse of publications (with author acknowledgement) which is part of gold access.  Examples offered give pause for thought, but a look at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US suggest the authors' moral rights and the nature of 'attribution' could be used to prevent some of these issues arising.

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