Opening up education
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Opening up education
Trends and developments in all aspects of open education: OER, MOOC, Open University
Curated by Robert Schuwer
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Problem-based Learning In MOOCs: Collaborating Online To Develop Real-world Skills - moocnewsandreviews.com

Problem-based Learning In MOOCs: Collaborating Online To Develop Real-world Skills - moocnewsandreviews.com | Opening up education | Scoop.it
One way to make the most of your MOOC experience is to use problem-based learning online to develop skills that have a real-world impact.
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verstelle's curator insight, July 23, 2013 9:47 AM
"This spring, two Coursera offerings – Prof. Michael Lenox’s Foundations of Business Strategy from the UVa Darden School  of Business and Prof. Bill Howe’s Introduction to Data Science from the University of  Washington – provided students the opportunity to do just that" and "allow students to connect with  businesses and complete experiential learning projects."Three tips the author gathered from participants:1)     Apply your skills to a cause that you’re  passionate about2)     Build relationships with your peers and other  people you work with3)     Take pride in your work

 

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Chinese universities jump the gun on disclosing partnerships with Coursera

Chinese universities jump the gun on disclosing partnerships with Coursera | Opening up education | Scoop.it
Two Chinese universities have reportedly revealed partnerships with online learning startup Coursera ahead of schedule. (Chinese universities and the partnerships with Coursera [i Mooc fanno tremare le frontiere (culturali)?
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Students Say Online Courses Enrich On-Campus Learning: Scientific American

Students Say Online Courses Enrich On-Campus Learning: Scientific American | Opening up education | Scoop.it
One in five science students surveyed by Nature and Scientific American has participated in a MOOC—and most would do so again
Robert Schuwer's insight:

Survey among (under)graduate students math and science worldwide about opinions on MOOC. The majority started because of curiosity (73%). A minority believe MOOC's offer greater educational value compared to traditional courses and also think their perceived value for a future career is less. A majority however will take a MOOC in the future. The opportunity to earn badges or a certificate drives some students to do a little more than only lurking because they are motivated by this opportunity, regardless of the real value of such badges or certificates.

 

 

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verstelle's curator insight, July 23, 2013 9:34 AM

"Survey among (under)graduate students math and science worldwide about opinions on MOOC. The majority started because of curiosity (73%). A minority believe MOOC's offer greater educational value compared to traditional courses and also think their perceived value for a future career is less. A majority however will take a MOOC in the future. The opportunity to earn badges or a certificate drives some students to do a little more than only lurking because they are motivated by this opportunity, regardless of the real value of such badges or certificates."

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Education online: The virtual lab

Education online: The virtual lab | Opening up education | Scoop.it
Confronted with the explosive popularity of online learning, researchers are seeking new ways to teach the practical skills of science.
Robert Schuwer's insight:

An approach to extend the pedagogical possibilities of a MOOC by providing entrance to virtual labs to gain practical skills. These could be implemented by apps. In the future, these apps could also be embedded into MOOC platforms as extensions to be used by course providers.

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Seven IITs, Infosys, TCS, Cognizant and Nasscom team up to provide free online courses

Seven IITs, Infosys, TCS, Cognizant and Nasscom team up to provide free online courses | Opening up education | Scoop.it
MUMBAI: Seven leading IITs, Infosys, TCS, Cognizant and industry lobby Nasscom are coming together to launch a bunch of free, online courses that could potentially help 100,000-150,000 people a year...
Robert Schuwer's insight:

As was to expected, India, one of the potential countries where current MOOC providers expect to gain a lot of popularity, is launching its own MOOC-platform. Maybe not from Ivy-League US universities, but undoubtly more localized and maybe therefore more acceptable for local people. My guess is other countries (China!) will soon follow.

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Scaling Education: The Absurd Case of the MOOC

Scaling Education: The Absurd Case of the MOOC | Opening up education | Scoop.it
The MOOC offers enormous potential to re-shape the way people learn and promoting access to content and expertise that many in this world could have only dreamed of years ago. But the naivete that ...
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Course: Insight 2013 - face-to-face other resources: Jisc RSC East Midlands Moodle 2

Course: Insight 2013 - face-to-face other resources: Jisc RSC East Midlands Moodle 2 | Opening up education | Scoop.it
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The attack of the MOOCs

The attack of the MOOCs | Opening up education | Scoop.it
DOTCOM mania was slow in coming to higher education, but now it has the venerable industry firmly in its grip. Since the launch early last year of Udacity and...
Robert Schuwer's insight:

Yet another article on business models behind MOOC's. Some remarkable quotes:

 

"Rob Lytle (...) says firms like Pearson (...) that run educational businesses such as textbook-publishing may thrive by offering free MOOCs as a way to get people to buy their related paid content". Will they connect this with universities for the content or will they do this as a new player in the field next to universities? If the latter: how about quality and trust?

 

"But Anant Agarwal, the boss of EdX, reckons the MOOC providers will be more like online airline-booking services, expanding the market by improving the customer experience.". An odd comparison: the actual experience is in the flight itself and not in the booking process and this flight is not changed at all. What has changed is the variety of in-flight services with the rise of the low-fare companies, but I would not call that an improvement of the customer experience.

 

"Doug Becker (...) reckons that many established universities will soon offer credits towards their degrees for those who complete MOOCs. He thinks this will drive a dramatic reduction in the price of a traditional higher education, that will reduce the total revenues of existing providers by far more than the revenue gained by the start-ups. Still, if MOOCs reduce the cost of higher education by one-third, as he predicts, yet only earn for themselves 1% of that benefit, that would “still be a very nice business,” he says." Maybe in the US, but also true in other parts of the world???

 

 

 

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Citing disappointing student outcomes, San Jose State pauses work with Udacity | Inside Higher Ed

Citing disappointing student outcomes, San Jose State pauses work with Udacity | Inside Higher Ed | Opening up education | Scoop.it
Robert Schuwer's insight:

Curious about the follow-up!

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timokos's curator insight, July 18, 2013 6:01 AM

Interesting outcomes of the experiments of San Jose State University with MOOCs!

 

Udacity students underperform compared to regular SJSU students (fugures are 51% passing rate compared to 74% passing rate, although both populations are hardly comparable), while edX students outperform regular SJSU students (no passing data available jet).

 

Besides the differences in platform, an important distinction is the way both are used: Udacity's MOOC, SJSU+, is a replacement of regular (remedial) courses, while edX's MOOC is a supplement used to try 'Flipping the classroom'. 

 

Can't wait to see the report on the edX experiment!

Arie den Boon's comment, September 6, 2013 5:06 AM
Failings make us learn quicker, and we still have a lot to learn. So lets not get disappointed.
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MOOCs: The Courage to Say No | INSERVER BLOG

MOOCs: The Courage to Say No | INSERVER BLOG | Opening up education | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley has enthusiastically promoted MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses), but some universities have decided MOOCs are not effective or
Robert Schuwer's insight:

Several universities expanding their online offerings, but critical on using MOOC's (solely) for this.

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timokos's curator insight, July 18, 2013 6:19 AM

Healthy and balanced online strategies by experienced players in the online and life-long-learning markets.

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What Makes Openness Work?

What Makes Openness Work? | Opening up education | Scoop.it
Here are our slides from today's project presentation at the Institute of Educational Technology. There is also a Cloudworks page for the event which includes more detailed slides on TrackOER. What...
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Research Questions for HarvardX

Research Questions for HarvardX | Opening up education | Scoop.it
The foundational tasks to get HarvardX research started and some of my own research questions.

Via timokos
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timokos's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:07 AM

Important research questions by Justin Reich, the HarvardX Research Fellow, I think everybody involved in MOOCs shoold be asking!

 

Interesting quotes that highlight Justin’s own views on the possibilities, current shortcomings and possible future of edX:

 

“The early evidence leaking out seems to be pretty clear on this point—MOOC participants are disproportionately people with college and advanced degrees—but I'm interested in doing a comprehensive review of economic diversity in HarvardX courses, and then examining the findings in light of my own theories of how expanding opportunity can exacerbate inequalities. All indications suggest that if we want xMOOCs to reduce inequalities, then we'll need to develop a set of design principles that allow us to target courses or supports to learners that we care most about serving.”

 

“My third interest is in design research, thinking about how we can expand our repertoire of practices on edX. How can we take the most interesting, innovative practices in online or residential education and bring them to life on for HarvardX courses?”For instance, in professional education (law, business, education), case studies are a vital part of teaching in many courses in programs. What tools could let people collaboratively engage in cases online? Could some of these cases be the foundation of new social games or simulations? There are a wide range of teaching strategies practiced across Harvard, and the edX LMS will need to grow to accommodate them.”

 

“Especially among the humanists I talk with from HarvardX, there is a great deal of interest in doing the kinds of things that connectivist MOOCs have been doing well for a number of years. I'm interested in thinking about how we push the possibilities of the edX platform or how we might use the marketing and student information system components of edX to support learning environments that are not primarily built on the edX LMS. A lot of my career is spent looking longingly at those educators who play on the exciting edges of things and then thinking, "OK, how do we get everyone there?"

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Emerging Trends in Online Education: A Resource Guide to Massive Open Online Courses

Emerging Trends in Online Education:  A Resource Guide to Massive Open Online Courses | Opening up education | Scoop.it
“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” ~Nelson Mandela~ Massive Open Online Courses: Access to quality education has lo… (Emerging Trends in Online Education: A Resource Guide to Massive Open Online Courses #mooc...
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State of the State: How OER Helps States Collaborate on Standards-Aligned Curriculum | Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education

State of the State: How OER Helps States Collaborate on Standards-Aligned Curriculum | Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education | Opening up education | Scoop.it
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Peerdal: We forced students to enroll in a MOOC... and they liked it!

Robert Schuwer's insight:

Students feedback in what was not a typical MOOC. Actually, the course offered had a MOOC format, but the students were regular students doing this MOOC for credit. Still some nice results. 

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F is for Failure; Or, Don't Invest Your Pension in MOOCs Yet - Tenured Radical - The Chronicle of Higher Education

F is for Failure; Or, Don't Invest Your Pension in MOOCs Yet - Tenured Radical - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Opening up education | Scoop.it
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From Hype to Nuanced Promise: American Higher Education and the MOOC 3.0 Era

From Hype to Nuanced Promise: American Higher Education and the MOOC 3.0 Era | Opening up education | Scoop.it
It's only been a year since MOOC-mania took hold, but already it's been a wild ride, a fast-changing evolution...
Robert Schuwer's insight:

MOOC 3.0 being described as using MOOC's as components of regular courses at institutions:

 

"Now, MOOC 3.0 has arrived with a focus on institutions importing MOOCs, usually not as complete courses, but as components used as needed by individual institutions and faculty members, whether it's a particular MOOC's content, methods or technology tools. For example, some faculty license content from MOOCs (video lectures, simulations or exercises) and integrate them into their hybrid or "flipped" classes. Faculty may refer students to a MOOC in order to prepare for an upcoming course or for additional practice or tutoring during a course."


This would need an open license on all the materials, preferably with the right to remix and rework the materials to make it fit to your context. The vast majority of current MOOC's do not have this kind of license (yet?). 

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Two-year colleges go open source to seek fix for remediation | Inside Higher Ed

Two-year colleges go open source to seek fix for remediation | Inside Higher Ed | Opening up education | Scoop.it
IHE article that points to a need for different course dev. finance model in OER world http://t.co/OxEalnRelS
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Week 11, MOOOCS – Massive Opportunities to Overcome Organisational Catastrophes, by Gilly Salmon

Week 11, MOOOCS – Massive Opportunities to Overcome Organisational Catastrophes, by Gilly Salmon | Opening up education | Scoop.it
Professor Gilly Salmon is Pro Vice-Chancellor, Learning Transformations at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne , Australia. Previously, she was the Executive Director and Professor (Lea...
Robert Schuwer's insight:

Nice comparison where the potential influence of MOOC's are compared to the effect of a tug-boat to a super tanker. To judge a MOOC, their control and influence, the amount of delicacy and intimacy, how they are based on scientific principles and the reliability are the quality criteria to judge a MOOC.

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School of Information announces first online Master of Information and Data Science degree

School of Information announces first online Master of Information and Data Science degree | Opening up education | Scoop.it
The School of Information's new online degree program addresses the nation's "dramatically growing need for well-trained big-data professionals."

Via drsmetty, Frederik Truyen
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drsmetty's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:28 AM

The world needs data scientists...

Tyler Griffin's curator insight, July 19, 2013 10:48 AM

Finding information effectively and efficiently is becoming more complex. So is the training that a librarian-type role requires.

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Making Sense of Euro MOOCs | Inside Higher Ed

Making Sense of Euro MOOCs  | Inside Higher Ed | Opening up education | Scoop.it

Via timokos
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timokos's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:02 AM

Nice summary on the European MOOCs in Global Context Workshop held at 19 & 20th of June at the University of Wisconsin Madison.

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MOOCs as a Worldwide Neocolonial Force: A Reflection on MIT’s Learning International Networks Consortium (LINC) Conference | James E Willis - Reflections on Teaching and Learning, blog

I had the privilege to attend MIT’s Learning International Networks Consortium (LINC) 2013 conference from June 16 – 19th. […] One topic, above all others, continues to resonate with me. […]  One of the attendees suggested that the MOOC (massive open online course) is a form of neocolonialism to the developing world. This means western educators presuppose a priority on what should be taught, what should be learned, and what forms “the” context of a given subject; MOOCs are the 21st century vehicle for spreading that presupposition to the world. It means that the first-world professors, instructional designers, and platform providers control not only the content learned by people worldwide, but more importantly, the ideologies spread through that learning.


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, July 17, 2013 10:23 AM

The question James Willis then asks himself is whether MOOCs indeed are a form of digitized neocolonialism. In earlier posts and blogs I have also considered this possibility, using the term cultural imperialism. Whatever the term, Willis quite accurately describes what the danger is in the above summary. In his description I suggest to take 'what should be taught etc.' broadly, that is, as not just encompassing the selection of courses but also choice of topics within courses and pedagogy.  The danger described then becomes obvious. All content is value laden, although some, such as religion, presumably more than other, such as programming languages. So with the content come all kinds of Western values. Second, pedagogy matters too. A pedagogy that heavily relies on Socratic discourse, which assumes you will challenge your professor, does not sit well with societies that put much value on authority. Luckily, this second objection is a less serious one in the current MOOCs as these heavily rely on a transfer or broadcasting model of teaching. However, the objection of the value-ladenness of content remains. 

 

Willis however is not convinced there is a danger. His counter-argument is that he is not convinced that this kind of criticism 'does real justice to historical notions of neocolonialism'. But that strikes me as quite beside the point. Perhaps he is right that the name used to label the criticism is unfortunate or plain wrong, but that does in no way violate the matter of the argument labeled. I for one still believe there is a serious danger of imposing Western cultural values and for that reason alone would dread the day that Sebastian Thrun's predication that in 50 years time only 10 universities survive comes true (that he apparently has retracted his prediction does not detract from the fact that he had no moral objections to its becoming true, on the contrary). See for details a series of blog posts of mine. 

(http://tiny.cc/6ced0w)

 

However, let's assume for the sake of argument that Willis addresses material issues rather than semantic ones only. One argument is that MOOCs do not hold financial power over students outside the US. I beg to differ. Actually, MOOCs even do in the US. If authorities decide to divert funding from education, students either have the choice to pay even more fees and tuitions or 'take a MOOC'. If that doesn't affect you financially  what does? Willis conclusion is that 'the question [of the ill effects of MOOCs] is one of global versus local context' and admits that 'value systems of an influential first-world country can have tangible effect on the localized contexts of people worldwide'. Exactly! (@pbsloep)

timokos's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:07 AM

Global versus Local: an important question!

 

"While MOOCs may not be neocolonialist strictly speaking, they certainly have the ability to irrevocably alter localized contexts. So, the question becomes: do MOOCs redefine what a global and local context mean?"