Our world is changing. It is complex, hyperconnected, and increasingly driven by insights derived from big data.1 And the rate of change shows no sign of slowing. Nor does the volume of data show any sign of shrinking. But, the economic and social value of big data does not come just from its quantity. It also comes from its quality – the ways in which individual bits of data can be interconnected to reveal new insights with the potential to transform business and society. Fully tapping that potential holds much promise, and much risk. By themselves, technology and data are neutral. It is their use that can both generate great value and create significant harm, sometimes simultaneously. This requires a rethink of traditional approaches to data governance, particularly a shift from focusing away from trying to control the data itself to focusing on the uses of data. It is up to the individuals and institutions of various societies to govern and decide how to unlock the value – both economic and social – and ensure suitable protections.


Via Complexity Digest