Open Science
Follow
Find
1.2K views | +9 today
 
Scooped by Tree of Science
onto Open Science
Scoop.it!

ScienceGist: Simplifiying science

ScienceGist: Simplifiying science | Open Science | Scoop.it

"Science gists are simplified summaries of scientific papers. Our goal is to bring science closer to everyone."

Tree of Science's insight:

ScienceGist provides a way for researchers to communicate their science to broader audience by offering an easy understandable abstract of their articles.

More informatio also in the blog post: http://bit.ly/19Jm5uv

more...
Antoine Taly's curator insight, August 28, 2013 5:42 AM

I like the idea to allow direct communication between researchers and the rest of the world

Open Science
Open science is a new open way to make science with shared workflow (citizen science), funding from everyone (crowdfunding), sourcing data from citizen (crowdsourcing)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

We have already paid for science: we should enjoy it for free

We have already paid for science: we should enjoy it for free | Open Science | Scoop.it

Most scientific research is publicly funded, and yet we have to pay to access it. This absurd situation should not be allowed to continue. (...) - Magazine Ouishare, by Sara Rodriguez Marin, 25 February 2015

Tree of Science's insight:

Promote #openaccess for #openscience, #openresearch. and more generally #openknowledge.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Open Science: Why data versioning and data care practices are key for science and social science.

Introduction to Open Science: Why data versioning and data care practices are key for science and social science. | Open Science | Scoop.it

A significant shift in how researchers approach their data is needed if transparent and reproducible research practices are to be broadly advanced. Carly Strasser has put together a useful guide to embracing open science, pitched largely at graduate students. But the tips shared will be of interest far beyond the completion of a PhD. If time is spent up front thinking about file organization, sample naming schemes, backup plans, and quality control measures, many hours of heartache can be averted. (...) - Blog LSE 'Impact of Social Sciences, by Carly Strasser, 09 February, 2015

Tree of Science's insight:

For researchers, data management, reproducibility, and open access are the critical ways to reach open science

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Medical researchers seek public's help

Medical researchers seek public's help | Open Science | Scoop.it

Four scientists at The Scripps Research Institute are asking for the public's help to find cures for rare diseases. They're not looking for money, but something even more precious to scientists backlogged with work -- your time.

Researchers led by Andrew Su are asking for volunteers to serve as "citizen scientists" to spot useful information in the ever-growing mountain of biomedical research. It's simply not possible for scientists to keep up.  (...) - by Bradley J. Fikes, U-T San Diego, Jan 31 2015

Tree of Science's insight:

Andrew Su and his three colleagues from The Scripps Research Institute have started a program called Mark2Cure that will use "citizen scientists" to help researchers spot important information in scientific publications. The researchers are drowning in information and want the public to help them find cures for rare disease. #openscience #citizenscience #research

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

The arXiv preprint server hits 1 million articles

The arXiv preprint server hits 1 million articles | Open Science | Scoop.it

Website where scientists flock to upload manuscripts before peer review has doubled its holdings in six years. (...) - Nature News, by Richard Van Noorden, 30 December 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

The #preprint repository platform arXiv succeed to reach one million free articles submitted. Created 24 years ago to overcome the slow system of #peerreview publishing, the platform is growing now exponentially pushed by the increasing needs of #openaccess to the #research data. This success already has inspired an similar platform in the biology field, bioRxiv.org #science2dot0

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Exciting times! PeerJ secures next round of funding led by SAGE and O’Reilly

Exciting times! PeerJ secures next round of funding led by SAGE and O’Reilly | Open Science | Scoop.it

We are pleased to announce that we have secured a new round of funding led by SAGE and O’Reilly. These new investments ensure that we can keep pushing forward the pace of publishing open access articles at a low cost of entry for authors. We still maintain our independent company status, and continue to stand by our mission of enabling authors to publish fast, at minimal cost, with maximum exposure to their research. (....) - PeerJ blog

Tree of Science's insight:

PeerJ push farther its development to secure low entry level costs and further increase its offering

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

'DIY labs offer an agile alternative to university-based research'

'DIY labs offer an agile alternative to university-based research' | Open Science | Scoop.it

Free from bureaucracy, independent science labs offer a flexibility that can't be matched by universities, writes a researcher. 

Laden with institutional bureaucracy and hampered by protracted funding and publishing systems, the juggernaut of university research is slow to change direction. In an era of rapid global change, are universities really the best places for progressive research? (...) - by Amber Griffiths, The Guardian, 16 June 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

Open-source based, community sharing and open science as a redline to follow, DIY labs are growing around the world. Often funded by crowdfunding, these hackers' labs are revealing creativity of you researchers or even citizen scientists. 

more...
JC CAILLIEZ, PhD's curator insight, July 21, 2014 4:21 AM

Une très belle initiative,... à reproduire idéalement dans toutes les universités ! 

Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Data sharing: Exciting but scary

Data sharing: Exciting but scary | Open Science | Scoop.it

Yesterday I did something I've never done before in many  years of publishing. When I submitted a revised manuscript of a research report to a journal, I also posted the dataset on the web, together with the script I'd used to extract the summary results. It was exciting. It felt as if I was part of a scientific revolution that has been gathering pace over the past two or three years, which culminated in adoption of a data policy by PLOS journals last February. This specified that authors were required to make the data underlying their scientific findings available publicly immediately upon publication of the article. As it happens, my paper is not submitted to PLOS, and so I'm not obliged to do this, but I wanted to, having considered the pros and cons. My decision was also influenced by the Wellcome Trust, who fund my work and encourage data sharing. (...) - by  Dorothy Bishop, BishopBlog, 26 May 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

Open science is a benefit for researchers and citizen but in practice it can be difficult for scientists to open their data afraid of the potential embarrassment of someone finding a mistake. Dorothy Bishop testimonial about her own experience in open data show us that open research forced you to ensure that your datasets are accurate and properly documented. But she finds that error is inevitable and unavoidable in science, however careful you try to be. The best way to flush out these errors is to make the data public.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Scientists, It’s Time to Embrace the Stage!

Scientists, It’s Time to Embrace the Stage! | Open Science | Scoop.it

Why and how should scientists embrace the stage to communicate their work?

The majority of academic content is presented in a dry, jargon-filled, inaccessible format. Also, it is hard to apply to a societal context. Papers fail to effectively support the public understanding of science. Here’s what researchers can do. (...) - The Incentive blog, 06/04/0214

Tree of Science's insight:

Find the #infographic "The State of Public Attitudes to Science" on our Pinterest board:  http://www.pinterest.com/pin/475481673131317083/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Large volumes of data are challenging open science

Large volumes of data are challenging open science | Open Science | Scoop.it
The ‘data explosion’ of the past 20 years undermines a basic scientific principle, argues Geoffrey Boulton. Open data and open science are not new concepts. Arguably they were introduced by Henry Oldenburg, the first secretary of the United Kingdom’s newly created Royal Society in the 1660s. Oldenburg frequently corresponded on scientific matters and persuaded the new society to publish the ‘letters’ he received — provided that a novel concept was accompanied by the evidence (the data) on which it depended. (...) - by Geoffrey Boulton, SciDevNet, February 18, 2014
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

From Crowdfunding To Open Access, Startups Are Experimenting With Academic Research

From Crowdfunding To Open Access, Startups Are Experimenting With Academic Research | Open Science | Scoop.it

These days may well be the next golden age for universities, and startups are leading the way. For institutions that can feel much like their counterparts from a thousand years ago, universities have witnessed breathtaking change in just a handful of years. (... ) - by Danny Crichton, TechCrunch, March 3, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

bioRxiv.org - the preprint server for Biology

bioRxiv.org - the preprint server for Biology | Open Science | Scoop.it
bioRxiv - the preprint server for biology, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a research and educational institution
Tree of Science's insight:

A well-known American research lab, the nonprofit Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), has launched BioRxiv (pronounced "bio-archive") with the idea to be biologists' version of arXiv, the popular preprint server (a free website that posts raw manuscripts online before they’re submitted to a journal) where physicists have been spontaneously self-archiving and shared their draft manuscripts since 1991. Similar to arXiv, “the goal is to speed the dissemination of research and give scientists a way to get feedback on their papers before they are formally peer-reviewed”, said John Inglis, CSHL Press executive director. Open access has a demonstrated benefits in terms of research uptake, usage and general impact.Therefore Biorxiv is a welcome addition to the growing list of disciplinary repositories for centralized search and retrieval. However deposit in Biorxiv should not be direct: researchers should export to it from their institutional repositories even ifBioRxiv can also harvest from institutional repositories (just as Google Scholar do).


In 1994 there was already a "Subversive Proposal" (by Stevan Harnad on June 27 1994) that all disciplines should do as the Arxivers had done. Harold Varmus, then-National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director, made a similar proposal ("e-biomed") in 1999. Critics shot it down for numerous reasons, including discomfort with the government hosting such a repository. The idea led nevertheless to PubMed Central, NIH’s archive of full-text published manuscripts. Preprint servers aimed at biology did eventually appear, including Nature Precedings but afterhaving posted thousands of manuscripts over 5 years it closed last year because it became "unsustainable," according to the journal. The Public Library of Science (PLOS) made an attempt at preprints 4 years ago with “PLOS Currents: Influenza”, but it apparently morphed into a peer-reviewed journal. More recent efforts include PeerJ PrePrints and F1000 Research; the latter site organizes open peer review of the paper and charges a fee.


Although anybody can freely submit a paper, not everything will be posted: A group of more than 40 "affiliate" scientists are screening submissions to "assure us that this is real science," Inglis says. Another limitation is that bioRxiv is restricted to life sciences, so no clinical trials and medically relevant researches will be published. However, human genetic data could be posted.

BioRxiv’s 15-member advisory board includes some prominent names, including arXiv creator Paul Ginsparg and Anurag Acharya, co-founder of Google Scholar.


BioRxiv’s commenting features will also set it apart from arXiv. The site starts with a few unusual features, i.e. contributors will not only tag their paper with the scientific field, but must also mark it as “New Results,” “Confirmatory Results,” or “Contradictory Results,” depending on whether it is an advance or confirms or contradicts previous experiments. Researchers can post revised versions of the paper and add links to the published paper.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Interview: Sascha Friesike: how enhanced collaboration is shaping the research of the future

Interview: Sascha Friesike: how enhanced collaboration is shaping the research of the future | Open Science | Scoop.it

Sascha Friesike is a researcher at the Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society, in Berlin, Germany. He holds a PhD in Technology and Innovation Management from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. His background is in engineering economics.

His research interests are innovation and creativity, He currently leads a research group called Open Science, which represents a new approach towards research, knowledge and its dissemination. (...) - Euroscientist Webzine, March 25th 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

EPA Launches New Citizen Science Website

EPA Launches New Citizen Science Website | Open Science | Scoop.it

Resources Available to Conduct Scientific Investigations in Communities

 

(New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has revamped its Citizen Science website to provide new resources and success stories to assist the public in conducting scientific research and collecting data to better understand their local environment and address issues of concern. The website can be found here.

“Citizen Science is an increasingly important part of EPA’s commitment to using sound science and technology to protect people’s health and safeguard the environment,” said Judith A. Enck, EPA Regional Administrator. “The EPA encourages the public to use the new website as a tool in furthering their scientific investigations and developing solutions to pollution problems.” (...) - SciStarter Blog, by Lily Bui, January 11th 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

The Citizen Science platform of EPA: http://www.epa.gov/region2/citizenscience/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Harnessing the power of social media to succeed in the biotech world

Harnessing the power of social media to succeed in the biotech world | Open Science | Scoop.it

In our Biotech Innovators series, we showcase disruptive and inspiring ideas and entrepreneurship stories. We try to find out more about their business, major challenges and how being an entrepreneur meant to them so far. This week, Stéphane-Bertin Hoffmann talked to Ethan Oren Perlstein, PhD, founder and CEO of Perlstein Lab,  a San Francisco-based biotech startup and public benefit corporation focused on precision […] - Blog Sciencebite, by Stéphane-Bertin hoffmann, February 9, 2015

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Openness in science is key to keeping public trust

Openness in science is key to keeping public trust | Open Science | Scoop.it

Silence stifles progress, says Mark Yarborough. The scientific enterprise needs a transparent culture that actively finds and fixes problems.

 

The Ebola crisis demonstrates once again that, despite all the posturing of politicians, it is scientists who the public looks to in times of crisis and concern. The public still trusts scientists. A UK survey this year found that they trust scientists even if they do not always trust scientific information itself. Still, the public’s trust is fragile. Given how much scientists depend on public goodwill and the funding that flows from it, I am always surprised by how much scientists take the public’s trust for granted. They can — and should — do more to protect and nurture it. (...) - by Mark Yarborough, Nature, 19 November 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

#openscience bring public trust but also #openaccess to results publications, #reproducibility of data, #collaborativeworking inside community of researchers and #citizenscience. Broadly, #openresearch also have link with #openinnovation #openlabs and #makerkabs

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

8 nature-focused projects for citizen scientists

8 nature-focused projects for citizen scientists | Open Science | Scoop.it

Volunteers can lend a hand, from categorizing whale songs to planting sunflowers.

 

Monitoring the planet’s health is more important than ever, but there are only so many scientists to go around and way too many endangered species and climate fluctuations to monitor. That’s where citizen scientists come in. Here are some interesting science projects just waiting for regular citizens to pitch in. (...) - mnn.com, by Sidney Stevens, Dec 22, 2014
Tree of Science's insight:

With #citizenscience, researchers are looking for an enormous green army of volunteers around the world who are more than willing to lend their eyes, ears and even their computers to make a difference. Think of it as crowd-sourced science. #openscience #crowdsourcing


The Great Sunflower project: Help create a national bee population map to unravel the mystery of the disappearing bees. (http://www.greatsunflower.org)


ReefQuest: Fostering Marine Environmental Stewardship Through Citizen Science (http://www.reefquest.org)


Cat Tracker (from Your Wild Life Project): "We want to resolve some of the wild mysteries of house cats, ancient mysteries of the animal with which millions of Americans share their beds, couches and nearly everything else". (http://cats.yourwildlife.org)


Project Noah: a tool to explore and document wildlife using a free citizen-science mobile app and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere. (http://www.projectnoah.org)


From Zooniverse

Whale FM:  A project to organise recordings of Orca and Pilot Whale calls. Volunteers were asked to match sounds to the most-similar call from a range of other recordings (http://whale.fm)


Bat Detective: The ultimate goal is to use your classifications to make a new automatic program that researchers all over the world can use to extract information out of their recordings, making it really easy to track populations of bats. This will make understanding how bat populations are being effected by global change much easier (http://www.batdetective.org)


Old Weather:  Researchers are using this past weather data to help create better climate change models for the future (http://www.oldweather.org)






more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Is Open Access a Cause or an Effect?

Is Open Access a Cause or an Effect? | Open Science | Scoop.it

Why can't researchers agree on whether Open Access is the cause of more citations or merely associated with better performing papers? The answer is in the methods. (...) - Blog "the scholarly kithchen", by Phil Davis, August 5, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Open access is not enough on its own – data must be free too

Open access is not enough on its own – data must be free too | Open Science | Scoop.it

Academics have been encouraged to make their research freely available, but their data also needs to be open to scrutiny.

 

If your research has been funded by the taxpayer, there's a good chance you'll be encouraged to publish your results on an open access basis – free at point of publication and with reuse and redistribution rights. (...) - by Susanna-Assunta Sansone, The Guardian, 26 June 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

Open access to the publication of the research is one on the step to the open research. To go further, this evolution in process must be linked to open data to really reach open science

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

An Introduction to Linked Open Data

An Introduction to Linked Open Data | Open Science | Scoop.it

If you’ve done any digital work—and who isn’t doing digital these days—then you’ve probably heard the term “linked open data” tossed around. “Open data,” as defined by Open Data Institute, is primary data that is freely available for others to use and share that is structured in a standard format that plays well with other file formats and includes metadata (data about the data, check out this Guardian guide for more information) about the data and how it was created. Barnett and Deliyannides (2011) define “open” resources as both a “family of copyright licensing policies under which authors and copyright owners make their works publicly available,” as well as a broader movement within “higher education to increase access to scholarly research and communication.” For graduate students, the “open” movement has provided numerous benefits including free access to articles, resources, software, data, and more—all of which save us money and increase the efficiency of our research. (...) - By Katy Meyers, 'gradhacker" blog on Inside Higher Ed, June 1, 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

In open research, there is a step beyon "open" (open science, open data): Linked open data! Researchers produced datasets and more than "only" open them, they provide configuration to create easy connections and sharing (licencing, easy readable, files format...). 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Improving GitHub for science

Improving GitHub for science | Open Science | Scoop.it

GitHub is being used today to build scientific software that's helping find Earth-like planets in other solar systems, analyze DNA, and build open source rockets.

Seeing these projects and all this momentum within academia has pushed us to think about how we can make GitHub a better tool for research. As scientific experiments become more complex and their datasets grow, researchers are spending more of their time writing tools and software to analyze the data they collect. Right now though, these efforts often happen in isolation. (...) - GitHub Blog, May 14, 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

The collaborative and code management platform, GitHub, is more and more used for scientific purposes. Open science, big data, and scientific software push developers and researchers to share knowledge and skills to write code for tools and software for awesome science. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Why open access should be a key issue for university leaders

Why open access should be a key issue for university leaders | Open Science | Scoop.it

Universities are drowning in digital information. It's time senior leaders made openness – and its consequences – their concern.

Universities are digital machines these days. But many of the decisions that have to be made as a result are not technical at all. They are about the nature of research and its public benefits, about how learning and teaching takes place, and how we confront difficult ethical issues. Strategic choices that are made now will have significant implications for the ways in which knowledge will be created and shared in the future. (...) - by Martin Hall, The Guardian, 18 February 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Citizen science draws amateurs into scientific research

Citizen science draws amateurs into scientific research | Open Science | Scoop.it

In the Internet era, research moves from professionals’ labs to amateurs’ homes.


FOR THOUSANDS of ordinary people around the world, one of biology’s hardest problems is just a game. Both scientists and supercomputers have long struggled to predict the three-dimensional structures of the biological molecules called proteins. These structures are crucial to understanding proteins’ roles in fundamental cellular processes and disease, but predicting them is no easy task—which is why some researchers have turned to laypeople for help.  (...) - by Katherine Xue, Harvard Magazine Jan-Feb 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

Citizen have been involved in science for a long time by their hobbies in astronomy, zoology, botanic... Hovewer at the fall of the 1990s, researchers asked citizen to help them in the first digital citizen-science project called SETI. Later, in 2004 Rosetta@home also required people to share their home computer to solve protein structure. Now lots of citizen science projects are provided helped by the power of social media, collaborative platforms and online gaming. A new relationship is growing between scientist and citizen. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

UK funder explains clamp-down on open access

UK funder explains clamp-down on open access | Open Science | Scoop.it

Wellcome Trust's Robert Kiley discusses sanctions to ensure that grants lead to freely available papers.

 

Since 2006, the giant medical-research charity Wellcome Trust has asked the researchers it funds to make their articles free to read online. Last year, it turned up pressure on scientists to comply, or see their funding withheld.

It seems to have worked: compliance with open-access requirements has improved (...) - by Richard Van Noorden, Nature, 09 April 2014

Tree of Science's insight:

The UK Wellcome Trust foundation has reach 69% of funded papers in #openaccess. Robert Kiley, head of digital services of the  Wellcome Trust, explains why the foundation is favouring the gold route for open access.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

3 simple things GitHub can do for science

3 simple things GitHub can do for science | Open Science | Scoop.it

The topic “GitHub for Science” has been explored quite a few times before and with good reason: it is quite exciting to envision what breakthroughs in scientific collaboration could come from GitHub backed explorations, with substantial capital to invest and a formidable team to execute.

With GitHub’s founder saying that: "In science, I think there’s huge changes that can be made there as well. — Tom Preston-Werner" (...) - by Jure Triglav, 11 January 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tree of Science
Scoop.it!

Sharing is caring - Why data sharing is beneficial for Science

Sharing is caring - Why data sharing is beneficial for Science | Open Science | Scoop.it

Most people would probably agree without hesitation that the sharing and communication of scientific findings, technical expertise and knowledge has brought humanity where it is now, and still is one of the cornerstones of modern civilization. Thus, the publication of scientific data is an essential necessity for publicly funded scientists. There is, however, quite some controversy about the details of scientific communication, or to be more precise: when to share data, and to what extent. (...) - by Florian Hauer, labfolder blog, Dec 11th 2013

more...
No comment yet.