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Open Research & Learning
Collection of ideas and resources for open research and open education
Curated by ghbrett
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MOOC Verses DOCC

MOOC Verses DOCC | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

'It was only a matter of time before massive open online courses (MOOC) were challenged to see online learning in a new light. Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) has a different approach to how students should learn through online education and the role of the instructor. Where MOOCs facilitated the traditional sense of teaching, having one instructor who values the topic they teach. DOCC has expanded this idea to include many instructors, experts, and guest lecturers from various regions to teach the students.

 

The belief for DOCC is that it takes more than one instructor on a subject for students to truly learn a topic. DOCC focuses on interaction between students, teachers, and peers to expand on their topic, while learning from one another is the vital component. Anne Balsamo, dean of the School of Media Studies at The New School and co-facilitator of the DOCC, said “who you learn with is as important as what you learn. Learning is a relationship, not just something that can be measured by outcomes or formal metrics.”" - From /source - http://proctorfree.com/mooc-verses-dooc


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Jeroen Bottema's curator insight, August 26, 2013 12:11 AM

"It was only a matter of time before massive open online courses (MOOC) were challenged to see online learning in a new light. Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) has a different approach to how students should learn through online education and the role of the instructor. Where MOOCs facilitated the traditional sense of teaching, having one instructor who values the topic they teach. DOCC has expanded this idea to include many instructors, experts, and guest lecturers from various regions to teach the students."

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Wikipatterns - Wiki Patterns

Wikipatterns - Wiki Patterns | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"Looking to spur wiki adoption? Want to grow from 10 users to 100, or 1000? Applying patterns that help coordinate people's efforts and guide the growth of content, and recognizing anti-patterns that might hinder growth - can give your wiki the greatest chance of success.

 

Wikipatterns.com is a toolbox of patterns & anti-patterns, and a guide to the stages of wiki adoption. It's also a wiki, which means you can help build the information based on your experiences! Beyond this site, there are many other additional resources." from source: - http://www.wikipatterns.com/

ghbrett's insight:

This is a good source of information about the use of Wikis in general. The two targets are People and Adoption. The site presents the positive aspects as well as barriers or negative aspects of Wikis. A reader or person interested in developing online communities would gain from viewing some of these patterns as useful for other instructional design, social media, online communities, communities of practice,  or online media in organizations.

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Art Museums Better Hurry Up and Get Ready for the Future of 3D Printing

Art Museums Better Hurry Up and Get Ready for the Future of 3D Printing | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"In his living room in San Diego right now, Cosmo Wenman has two life-sized reproductions of the British Museum’s Head of a Horse of Selene, a magnificently life-like sculpture with nostrils flared that dates to around 432 B.C. The original in Britain is made of marble, about three feet end-to-end. Wenman's copies, created with an older digital camera and a MakerBot 3D printer, are clearly reproductions as soon as you lift them up. Created out of plastic, coated in a bronze patina, they weigh about 8 pounds each." from source: http://www.theatlanticcities.com

 

-- EMILY BADGER JUN 20, 2013

ghbrett's insight:

It was a matter of time before not only 3D printer folk began broadening their use of the printers, but also that the media would begin to notice. I am pleased to see that the 3D printer is sensitive to copyright issues about the works that he is creating. Living in the Washington, DC, USA area for years I have seen many cheap plaster recreations of statues, buildings, and historical people for sale on the streets. Much like the pantograph allowed plain people to "copy" drawings, photographs to "copy" paintings, copy machines to "copy" books and papers, and scanners to "copy" almost any 2D material from photographs to currency. 3D printers will become yet another technology of un-intended consequences due to the fact that people thinking out of the box or who have not read the manual will use the 3D printers to make stuff that suits their needs or fancies. It will be a time of invention, legal turf fighting, and disruption. Here we go again.

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Future Trends in Technology and Education

Future Trends in Technology and Education | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"Future Trends in Technology and Education is a monthly report. It surveys recent developments in how education is changing, primarily under the impact of digital technologies. Its purpose is to help educators, policy-makers, and the public think about the future of teaching, learning, research, and institutions.

 

Every month FTTE aggregates recent developments, checking them against previously-identified trendlines. As certain trends build in support and significance, the report recommends watching them for future impact. FTTE also notes trends which appear to be declining in significance."

-- from source: http://bryanalexander.org/

ghbrett's insight:

Bryan Alexander is not only one of the leading Thought Leaders of Technology for Education, Training, and Research; he is one of the most scholarly, well grounded, sharing people I know. His work is based on fact with a dab of opinion from others as well as himself. His eyes, ears, and haptic senses are sensitive to opportunities and trends. Bryan's voice asks the difficult but important questions. Then his synthesis of this input is shared openly with us. He is an essential part of the future. That is why you should quickly take advantage of his offer to share his new monthly report "Future Trends in Technology and Education."

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Howard Rheingold's comment, June 18, 2013 12:58 PM
I agree with George. Follow this if you are interested in the topic.
ghbrett's comment, June 18, 2013 1:01 PM
Thanks Howard!
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THE OPEN BOOK

"THE OPEN BOOK is a crowdsourced, multi-author publication built to contextualise the international movement for open knowledge in the words of those who are helping build it today. What are the aims and motivations of this movement’s pioneers, and how do concepts about digital transparency, open data and the Commons impact society? Based on contributions from a variety of thought leaders working in fields as diverse as sustainability, design, business and development, THE OPEN BOOK will serve as a platform for discussion and a launching pad for new ideas about the future of a global open knowledge movement in a time of rapid technological and societal progress" from source: http://issuu.com/finnish-institute/

ghbrett's insight:

Simply put, this is a great read about the many facets of Open Knowledge. It includes a chapter about Peeragogy (http://peeragogy.org)

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RCUK welcomes recommendations made by the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee on open access - RCUK

Research Councils UK (RCUK) welcomes the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee's report, The Implementation of Open Access, which has been published today.
ghbrett's insight:
This article is evidence that the United Kingdom is taking seriously the need for Open Access. RCUK makes a brief but important response in this article.
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» Napster, Udacity, and the Academy Clay Shirky

"...Yet things did fail, in large part because, after Napster, the industry’s insistence that digital distribution be as expensive and inconvenient as a trip to the record store suddenly struck millions of people as a completely terrible idea.

Once you see this pattern—a new story rearranging people’s sense of the possible, with the incumbents the last to know—you see it everywhere. First, the people running the old system don’t notice the change. When they do, they assume it’s minor. Then that it’s a niche. Then a fad. And by the time they understand that the world has actually changed, they’ve squandered most of the time they had to adapt.

It’s been interesting watching this unfold in music, books, newspapers, TV, but nothing has ever been as interesting to me as watching it happen in my own backyard. Higher education is now being disrupted; our MP3 is the massive open online course (or MOOC), and our Napster is Udacity, the education startup." -- from the Source: http://www.shirky.com/
ghbrett's insight:

Clay Shirky presents a fairly long look at the emergence and impact of massive open online courses (MOOCs) in general on higher education institutions. He begins with a historical brief of Napster and the music industry as a baseline and expands from there. Evidently Shirky hit some tender spots since there are 74 responsive comments to the article and there are other articles that use it as the baseline for their commentary. This is a worthwhile read.

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Rescooped by ghbrett from Education Tech & Tools
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IncitED -a crowdfunding community designed for educators

IncitED -a crowdfunding community designed for educators | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"To incite important educational initiatives and innovations that benefit learners and their communities around the world. We want to provide a powerful and intuitive platform where educators can:
> Fund worthwhile projects
> Find, share, and replicate effective practices
> Collaborate and inspire one another

 

We aim to do this by simplifying the process of contributing to excellent projects worldwide for all who share the goal of bettering education."

 

from source:  - http://incited.org/

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ghbrett's curator insight, July 8, 2013 9:29 AM

It's great to see a crowdfunding (crowdsource funding) site for Education! Have a look and see if your education or training activities might benefit from such funding or at least the exposure to this community online.

Andrew Woods's curator insight, February 4, 8:15 PM

Interesting idea!

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BigBluebutton - open source web conferencing with extended functions

BigBluebutton - open source web conferencing with extended functions | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"BigBlueButton is an open source web conferencing system built on over fourteen open source components to create an integrated solution that runs on Mac, Unix, and PC computers. In the true sense of open source, we invite you to try out and participate in our project.


Vision: Our vision is that starting a web conference should be as easy as clicking a single metaphorical big blue button. As an open source project, we believe it should be easy for others to embrace and extend education. And while web conferencing means many things to many people — our focus is to make the best web conferencing system for distance education.


What’s new in this release (Beta 08.1):
1) Simplified interface – BigBlueButton now has a consolidated Users window for easier session management and a more consistent user interface (including updated skin and icons) to help new users get started quickly.

 

2) Layout Manager – BigBlueButton now enables users to choose from a number of preset layouts to quickly adapt to different modes of learning.

 

3) Recording of whiteboard and webcams – BigBlueButton now records for playback all the activity in the presentation window (whiteboard, mouse movements, and pan/zoom) and all webcams shared during a session.

 

4) Text tool for whiteboard – Presenters can now annotate their slides with text.

 

5) New APIs – The BigBlueButton API now includes the ability to dynamically configure each client on a per-user bases, thus enabling developers to configure the skin, layout, modules, etc. for each user. There is also a JavaScript interface to control the client.

 

6) Accessibility – BigBlueButton now supports screen readers JAWS (version 11+) and NVDA. A list of keyboard shortcuts have been added to make it easier to navigate through the interface using the keyboard.

 

7) LTI Support – BigBlueButton is IMS Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI) 1.0 compliant. This means any LTI consumer can integrate with BigBlueButton without requiring custom plug-ins.

 

8) Mozilla Persona – The API demos now include examples of how to sign into a BigBlueButton session using Mozilla Persona.
Support for LibreOffice 4.0 – BigBlueButton now uses LibreOffice 4.0 for conversion of of 9) MS Office documents (upload of PDF is still recommend to provide best results)." from source: http://www.bigbluebutton.org/

ghbrett's insight:

This sounds like an exciting alternative educational, training, and groupware tool. I will be participating in a group test later next week and will make a further comment then.

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"Open Access" By Peter Suber

"Open Access" By Peter Suber | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"Open Access - By Peter Suber 

 

NOW AVAILABLE IN MULTIPLE OPEN ACCESS FORMATS

 

... The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work “open access”: digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue.

 

In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn’t, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber’s influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers."

-- from source: https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/open-access

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ghbrett's curator insight, June 18, 2013 1:44 PM

Peter Suber has been a driving force in the rapidly growing area(s) of Open Access. Rather than cite this or that have a look at his info at Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Suber  Here is a wonderful resource for anyone who uses Internet resources. Get a copy for a eBook-Reader, a computer, or your Boss, but don't forget yourself. Then Read it and then keep as a handy reference resource.

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Three Kinds of MOOCs « Lisa's (Online) Teaching Blog

"We are so into MOOCs now that it’s too much for me. Gotta apply Ockham’s Razor 2.0 to this stuff.

 

At the Ed-Media conference, I attended a session by Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. In her discussion of Troubleshooting MOOCs, she noted the dificulties in determining her own direction in offering a MOOC in the “Stanford model” MOOCs versus the “connectivism” MOOCs. I found myself breaking it down into three categories instead. 


Each type of MOOC has all three elements (networks, tasks and content), but each has a goal that is dominant.

 

Network-based MOOCs are the original MOOCs, taught by Alec Couros, George Siemens, Stephen Downes, Dave Cormier. The goal is not so much content and skills acquisition, but conversation, socially constructed knowledge, and exposure to the milieu of learning on the open web using distributed means. The pedagogy of network-based MOOCs is based in connectivist or connectivist-style methods. Resources are provided, but exploration is more important than any particular content. Traditional assessment is difficult.

 

Task-based MOOCs emphasize skills in the sense that they ask the learner to complete certain types of work. In Jim Groom’s ds106 at UMW, the learning is distributed and the formats variable. There are many options for completing each assignment, but a certain number and variety of assignments need to be done to perform the skills. Similarly, our POT Certificate Class focuses on different topics for each week, and skills are demonstrated through sections on design, audio, video etc. in an effort to expose learners to many different formats and styles in online teaching. Community is crucial, particularly for examples and assistance, but it is a secondary goal. Pedagogy of task-based MOOCs tend to be a mix of instructivism and constructivism. Traditional assessment is difficult here too.

 

Content-based MOOCs are the ones with huge enrollments, commercial prospects, big university professors, automated testing, and exposure in the popular press. Community is difficult but may be highly significant to the participants, or one can go it alone. Content acquisition is more important in these classes than either networking or task completion, and they tend to use instructivist pedagogy. Traditional assessment, both formative and summative, may be emphasized. Mass participation seems to imply mass processing." from source: http://lisahistory.net/

ghbrett's insight:

Good post, points to SideShare post bye Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. ( http://slidesha.re/11NFMs9 ). Apparently the notion of MOOCs as a fad is settling down. Now educators, trainers, and others are beginning to better understand the development, content, design, and processes involved in running a MOOC. Also, there is a growing paradox in this space, the term "Open" occasionally does not imply free. I can imagine that there will be emerging pricing schedules from free to various fees set by the MOOC publishers.

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Difundi's curator insight, June 13, 2:41 PM

Explicación simple y clara de los tipos de MOOC: Network-based, Task-based, Content-based.

 

El modelo que sigue Difundi es el en el que se basa OpenMOOC, software en el que se basa y que fundamentalmente se encuadra en el tercer tipo (Content-based) pero, que puede tener fuerte componente del primer tipo (Network-based) si se hace uso de servicios externos en la nube, como son blogs, redes, documentos colaborativos, etc.

 

La calidad de los contenidos y la dinamización de un MOOC son elementos clave y depende de ello, que la tasa de terminación sea alta. Si la dimensión Network-based de un MOOC es mayor, más y mejor dinamización necesitará.

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NASA - Flagship Initiatives

NASA - Flagship Initiatives | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"Nebula is an open-source cloud computing platform that was developed to provide an easily quantifiable and improved alternative to building additional expensive data centers and to provide an easier way for NASA scientists and researchers to share large, complex data sets with external partners and the public.

... Cloud computing is a significant departure from the traditional IT infrastructure model. It will require technical training as well as a shift in how our teams and programs think about IT resources. This shift will require us to change budgeting, procurement, workflow, and our approach toward processing, storing, and accessing data. As a mission-driven Agency that is reliant upon data, we will need to provide adequate education and training to employees and contractors for greater adoption." -from source: http://www.nasa.gov/open/plan/nebula.html

ghbrett's insight:

NASA has often been a leader in education and training using new media and emerging technologies. Here is one more instance of that. It is especially important in that it is an open-source project for a cloud-computing platform for dealing with Big Data. Big Data is another emerging technology that this project will serve as a model for other agencies to adopt. The training materials developed for the project should prove worth while as content and as models for other training programs in organizations and agencies.

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ghbrett's curator insight, February 28, 2013 7:26 AM

NASA has often been a leader in education and training using new media and emerging technologies. Here is one more instance of that. It is especially important in that it is an open-source project for a cloud-computing platform for dealing with Big Data. Big Data is another emerging technology that this project will serve as a model for other agencies to adopt. The training materials developed for the project should prove worth while as content and as models for other training programs in organizations and agencies.

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Open Educational Arts Practice

Open Educational Arts Practice | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it
Openly sharing knowledge, experience and specialism of art, design and media across the sector
ghbrett's insight:

Check out "Open Educational Arts Practice" here on Scoop.it for good ideas and resources. From time to time I will be posting some of the more interesting or relevant nuggets to my Scoop.it Topics. 

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