Open Research & Learning
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Open Research & Learning
Collection of ideas and resources for open research and open education
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Nasa to take first 3D-printer into space

Nasa to take first 3D-printer into space | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"Nasa to take first 3D-printer into space
... A little larger than a shoe box, the printer has a metal shell with a glass window that offers a view of the goings-on within, so the crew can monitor the progress of the clips, buckles and containers they are printing. The designers say their machine could print anything from toilet pipes to life-saving tools, and imagine a future of game-changing capabilities – including the ability to manufacture kilometre-long megastructures that could not be launched from Earth, as well as construct entire spacecraft mined from asteroid materials."

 

from source: http://www.theguardian.com/

 

#NASA #3D-printer #Maker #Making #Replacement-Parts #space-craft #game-changer #manufacture 

ghbrett's insight:

This is an example of how 3D-printing and 3D-printers are being used in new and unusual environments. There have been discussions about how hospitals might use 3D printing for various medical purposes from external braces, to internal objects, or even printing tissue replacements. Also, 3D printers might be used at remote sites to manufacture replacement parts whether in plastic, steel, concrete, wood, or other materials not imagined yet.

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Art Museums Better Hurry Up and Get Ready for the Future of 3D Printing

Art Museums Better Hurry Up and Get Ready for the Future of 3D Printing | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"In his living room in San Diego right now, Cosmo Wenman has two life-sized reproductions of the British Museum’s Head of a Horse of Selene, a magnificently life-like sculpture with nostrils flared that dates to around 432 B.C. The original in Britain is made of marble, about three feet end-to-end. Wenman's copies, created with an older digital camera and a MakerBot 3D printer, are clearly reproductions as soon as you lift them up. Created out of plastic, coated in a bronze patina, they weigh about 8 pounds each." from source: http://www.theatlanticcities.com

 

-- EMILY BADGER JUN 20, 2013

ghbrett's insight:

It was a matter of time before not only 3D printer folk began broadening their use of the printers, but also that the media would begin to notice. I am pleased to see that the 3D printer is sensitive to copyright issues about the works that he is creating. Living in the Washington, DC, USA area for years I have seen many cheap plaster recreations of statues, buildings, and historical people for sale on the streets. Much like the pantograph allowed plain people to "copy" drawings, photographs to "copy" paintings, copy machines to "copy" books and papers, and scanners to "copy" almost any 2D material from photographs to currency. 3D printers will become yet another technology of un-intended consequences due to the fact that people thinking out of the box or who have not read the manual will use the 3D printers to make stuff that suits their needs or fancies. It will be a time of invention, legal turf fighting, and disruption. Here we go again.

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