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Open Research & Learning
Collection of ideas and resources for open research and open education
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Google Expands Role In Digital Education, Teams Up With edX To Build A YouTube For Free Online Courses

Google Expands Role In Digital Education, Teams Up With edX To Build A YouTube For Free Online Courses | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

It’s turning into a busy week for Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) providers, and the tech companies that love them — particularly Google. Udacity co-founder and CEO Sebastian Thrun and California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom announced the Open Education Alliance, a consortium of online organizations dedicated to closing the skills gap, developing standards for career readiness and providing the content that will help get students ready for the workforce. Google and AT&T are some of the names already endorsing the Alliance, while rumors have been circling that Coursera and other MOOC providers are on board as well. However, at this point who will be participating and what it could mean for education is still up in the air. It’s an alliance-in-progress.

 

Google also took another big step into the open courseware game, announcing a new partnership with edX — the Harvard and MIT-backed, non-profit organization that currently stands as one of the Big Three MOOC Providers, along with Udacity and Coursera. Together, the two companies plan to launch MOOC.org, a site that will allow teachers, businesses — and really anyone — to create their own digital course and share it with the world. As of now, the site is slated for launch in the first half of 2014.

 

For edX, MOOC.org represents another step towards going beyond the boundaries of its current model, which includes partnership with institutions like Harvard, MIT, Stanford and other elite universities. In April, the organization merged with Stanford University-based startup Class2Go to build an open-source version of its platform that can be used by any institution around the globe. The goal has been to allow developers access to edX’s code to allow any institution to host and distribute digital courses for on-campus and distance learners — both online and offline — and create better ways to collect student data.


Via Huey O'Brien
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MOOCs Directory

"Regardless of your personal opinion on the value of these Massive Open Online Courses, the current reality for many low income, and underserved student populations in the US, and globally is that these free open courses from some of the world's leading experts is a  partial win of the "Educational Access Lottery". Partial because winning the full lottery would require adding free broadband access, and credit options for their MOOCs courses. "


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Gabi Witthaus
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Dr. Susan Bainbridge's curator insight, August 22, 2013 4:55 AM

Extensive listing of available MOOCs.

Gabi Witthaus's curator insight, August 22, 2013 9:36 AM

Via Susan Bainbridge - extensive listing of available MOOCs.

Pieter de Vries's curator insight, August 22, 2013 12:02 PM

Know where to go ...

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Why the Past Cannot Predict the Future of MOOCs and Online Learning [#Infographic]

Why the Past Cannot Predict the Future of MOOCs and Online Learning [#Infographic] | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it
Higher education has withstood centuries of progress without changing. That’s about to change.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Ante Lauc's curator insight, May 20, 2013 7:02 AM

past can predict future if we do know dialectic...

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The MOOC Quality Project

The MOOC Quality Project | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it
The MOOC Quality Project will ask 12 experts in 12 weeks for their best thinking on MOOCs and quality.MOOCs represent the latest stage in the evolution of open educational resources. First was open...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Free Online Open Courses - OEDB.org

Free Online Open Courses - OEDB.org | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"Get free online courses from the world's leading universities at the Open Education Database. This collection includes over 2850 free courses in the liberal arts and sciences. Download these audio & video courses straight to your computer or mp3 player." from source: http://oedb.org/open/

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ghbrett's curator insight, January 21, 2013 6:16 PM

The Open Courses listed on this page include Arts, Education, Liberal Arts, Medicine, Business, Engineering & Computers, Math, Science. In addition to Open Courses already listed, the top navigation bar other topics include Online Colleges, Online Degree Programs, and Library. Currently there are 1166 Full Courses, 423 Video lectures, 214 Audio Lectures, 453 Text Articles, and 577 Mixed Media offerings. Looks like The Open Education Data Base is worth checking out.

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Welcome to Openness in Education ~ Openness in Education

Welcome to Openness in Education ~ Openness in Education | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"This 12 week course, starting September 10, 2012 will explore openness in education - its roots, its growing influence, and economic and systemic impact.
We have adopted an open online format (massive open online courses, sometimes referred to as MOOCs...though we expect this course won't hit that "massive" target achieved by initiatives like Coursera and EDx." - from source: http://open.mooc.ca/index.html

 

NOTE: A marvelous resource for Open Education, Open Education Resources (OER), and related topics. Well worth looking into. Thanks to the organizers.

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MOOC Verses DOCC

MOOC Verses DOCC | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

'It was only a matter of time before massive open online courses (MOOC) were challenged to see online learning in a new light. Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) has a different approach to how students should learn through online education and the role of the instructor. Where MOOCs facilitated the traditional sense of teaching, having one instructor who values the topic they teach. DOCC has expanded this idea to include many instructors, experts, and guest lecturers from various regions to teach the students.

 

The belief for DOCC is that it takes more than one instructor on a subject for students to truly learn a topic. DOCC focuses on interaction between students, teachers, and peers to expand on their topic, while learning from one another is the vital component. Anne Balsamo, dean of the School of Media Studies at The New School and co-facilitator of the DOCC, said “who you learn with is as important as what you learn. Learning is a relationship, not just something that can be measured by outcomes or formal metrics.”" - From /source - http://proctorfree.com/mooc-verses-dooc


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Jeroen Bottema's curator insight, August 26, 2013 3:11 AM

"It was only a matter of time before massive open online courses (MOOC) were challenged to see online learning in a new light. Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) has a different approach to how students should learn through online education and the role of the instructor. Where MOOCs facilitated the traditional sense of teaching, having one instructor who values the topic they teach. DOCC has expanded this idea to include many instructors, experts, and guest lecturers from various regions to teach the students."

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How not to write against MOOCs and education reform

How not to write against MOOCs and education reform | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"...it’s depressing to see thoughtful, serious articles in mid-2013 that claim to analyze MOOCs making elementary mistakes about technology.  ”Predatory” proceeds energetically without realizing cMOOCs exist.  That cMOOCs were the first out of the gate, and represent an alternative to xMOOCs which authors might actually appreciate (please check Wikipedia if you’re unsure of the difference).  Gecan also deems xMOOCs to be so “incredibly complex and technical” as to be comparable with the most advanced financial products which helped cause the 2008 financial crisis.  xMOOCs are many things, but they are not that complex.  Indeed, some charge them with being un-innovative in an era of actual technological innovation." from source:  http://bryanalexander.org/

ghbrett's insight:

Bryan's blog is full of thoughtful and useful information about technology and education. Here is another example of such information. At the moment MOOCs of all sorts are going through various growing / emergence pains. Bryan does a great job referencing and commenting on various current trends and articles about the positive and negative reporting and evaluation of MOOCs. Well worth reading if you are on the fence about implementing or engaging in a MOOC.

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Three Kinds of MOOCs « Lisa's (Online) Teaching Blog

"We are so into MOOCs now that it’s too much for me. Gotta apply Ockham’s Razor 2.0 to this stuff.

 

At the Ed-Media conference, I attended a session by Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. In her discussion of Troubleshooting MOOCs, she noted the dificulties in determining her own direction in offering a MOOC in the “Stanford model” MOOCs versus the “connectivism” MOOCs. I found myself breaking it down into three categories instead. 


Each type of MOOC has all three elements (networks, tasks and content), but each has a goal that is dominant.

 

Network-based MOOCs are the original MOOCs, taught by Alec Couros, George Siemens, Stephen Downes, Dave Cormier. The goal is not so much content and skills acquisition, but conversation, socially constructed knowledge, and exposure to the milieu of learning on the open web using distributed means. The pedagogy of network-based MOOCs is based in connectivist or connectivist-style methods. Resources are provided, but exploration is more important than any particular content. Traditional assessment is difficult.

 

Task-based MOOCs emphasize skills in the sense that they ask the learner to complete certain types of work. In Jim Groom’s ds106 at UMW, the learning is distributed and the formats variable. There are many options for completing each assignment, but a certain number and variety of assignments need to be done to perform the skills. Similarly, our POT Certificate Class focuses on different topics for each week, and skills are demonstrated through sections on design, audio, video etc. in an effort to expose learners to many different formats and styles in online teaching. Community is crucial, particularly for examples and assistance, but it is a secondary goal. Pedagogy of task-based MOOCs tend to be a mix of instructivism and constructivism. Traditional assessment is difficult here too.

 

Content-based MOOCs are the ones with huge enrollments, commercial prospects, big university professors, automated testing, and exposure in the popular press. Community is difficult but may be highly significant to the participants, or one can go it alone. Content acquisition is more important in these classes than either networking or task completion, and they tend to use instructivist pedagogy. Traditional assessment, both formative and summative, may be emphasized. Mass participation seems to imply mass processing." from source: http://lisahistory.net/

ghbrett's insight:

Good post, points to SideShare post bye Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. ( http://slidesha.re/11NFMs9 ). Apparently the notion of MOOCs as a fad is settling down. Now educators, trainers, and others are beginning to better understand the development, content, design, and processes involved in running a MOOC. Also, there is a growing paradox in this space, the term "Open" occasionally does not imply free. I can imagine that there will be emerging pricing schedules from free to various fees set by the MOOC publishers.

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Difundi's curator insight, June 13, 2014 5:41 PM

Explicación simple y clara de los tipos de MOOC: Network-based, Task-based, Content-based.

 

El modelo que sigue Difundi es el en el que se basa OpenMOOC, software en el que se basa y que fundamentalmente se encuadra en el tercer tipo (Content-based) pero, que puede tener fuerte componente del primer tipo (Network-based) si se hace uso de servicios externos en la nube, como son blogs, redes, documentos colaborativos, etc.

 

La calidad de los contenidos y la dinamización de un MOOC son elementos clave y depende de ello, que la tasa de terminación sea alta. Si la dimensión Network-based de un MOOC es mayor, más y mejor dinamización necesitará.

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The Professors Behind the MOOC Hype | Open Education News

The Professors Behind the MOOC Hype | Open Education News | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it
In the largest survey of instructors who have taught massive open online courses, The Chronicle of Higher Education heard from critics, converts, and the cautious.
ghbrett's insight:

This is an interesting infographic about a survey of faculty. I note that giving credit is little over 1/4 of those responding to the survey. On the other hand over 3/4 respondents consider MOOCs worth the hype. I think that's an interesting paradox.

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» Napster, Udacity, and the Academy Clay Shirky

"...Yet things did fail, in large part because, after Napster, the industry’s insistence that digital distribution be as expensive and inconvenient as a trip to the record store suddenly struck millions of people as a completely terrible idea.

Once you see this pattern—a new story rearranging people’s sense of the possible, with the incumbents the last to know—you see it everywhere. First, the people running the old system don’t notice the change. When they do, they assume it’s minor. Then that it’s a niche. Then a fad. And by the time they understand that the world has actually changed, they’ve squandered most of the time they had to adapt.

It’s been interesting watching this unfold in music, books, newspapers, TV, but nothing has ever been as interesting to me as watching it happen in my own backyard. Higher education is now being disrupted; our MP3 is the massive open online course (or MOOC), and our Napster is Udacity, the education startup." -- from the Source: http://www.shirky.com/
ghbrett's insight:

Clay Shirky presents a fairly long look at the emergence and impact of massive open online courses (MOOCs) in general on higher education institutions. He begins with a historical brief of Napster and the music industry as a baseline and expands from there. Evidently Shirky hit some tender spots since there are 74 responsive comments to the article and there are other articles that use it as the baseline for their commentary. This is a worthwhile read.

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Timothy Vollmer: Keeping MOOCs Open

Timothy Vollmer: Keeping MOOCs Open | Open Research & Learning | Scoop.it

"The new cohort of MOOCs are distinct from the original MOOCs in that they are “open,” thus far, in only one respect: they are open enrollment. The new MOOCs have not yet openly licensed their courses. As MOOCs continue to develop course content and experiment with various business models, we think it’s crucial that they consider adopting open licenses as a default on their digital education offerings.

... Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators. MOOCs — or Massive Open Online Courses — have been getting a lot of attention lately." from the source Creative Commons. 

 

Note: This presents a clear case that internet users need to be aware of the resources they want to use. There is open in all ways and then there is open where only certain features are open and free. Caveat Emptor. 


Via Andreas Link
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