Open Mind & Open Heart
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Open Mind & Open Heart
indulging in an intellectual smorgasbord
Curated by Patty Golden
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How dolphins see the world: A comparison with chimpanzees and humans

How dolphins see the world: A comparison with chimpanzees and humans | Open Mind & Open Heart | Scoop.it

Bottlenose dolphins use auditory (or echoic) information to recognize their environments, and many studies have described their echolocation perception abilities. However, relatively few systematic studies have examined their visual perception. A team of scientists now tested dolphins on a visual-matching task using two-dimensional geometric forms including various features. Based on error patterns, they used multidimensional scaling to analyze perceptual similarities among stimuli. In addition to dolphins, they conducted comparable tests with terrestrial species: chimpanzees were tested on a computer-controlled matching task and humans were tested on a rating task. The overall perceptual similarities among stimuli in dolphins were similar to those in the two species of primates. These results clearly indicate that the visual world is perceived similarly by the three species of mammals, even though each has adapted to a different environment and has differing degrees of dependence on vision.

 

Because dolphins have adapted to an underwater environment, they have developed a perceptual system that differs considerably from that of terrestrial mammals such as primates. One strikingly different aspect of the perceptual system of dolphins is echolocation1,. They can recognize shapes, materials, and the texture of objects using this form of biological sonar. Many echolocation studies on cetaceans have been conducted both in the laboratory and in the wild4. A few studies have investigated dolphins' ability to use cross-modal integration through vision–echolocation matching5, 6,. In these studies, dolphins were very accurate in matching three-dimensional complex objects using information gathered via echolocation. On the other hand, these results indirectly suggest that dolphins may also visually discriminate complex objects. Dolphins (e.g., bottlenose dolphins) have poorer in-air and underwater visual acuity (12.6 min of visual angle from a distance of 2.5 m) than that of primates10. Nevertheless, they still visually recognize and discriminate human gestural signs11, 12, 13, mirror images of themselves14, 15, numbers of objects16, three-dimensional objects4, 17, and two-dimensional forms17, 18. Moreover, researchers have used visual stimuli to study the basic features of the vision and various cognitive abilities of dolphins17, 18.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Casper Pieters's curator insight, March 9, 2014 7:28 PM

Great visual for bio studies.

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The Power of your Amazing Brain

The Power of your Amazing Brain | Open Mind & Open Heart | Scoop.it

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Susan Gingras Fitzell's curator insight, January 13, 2013 10:30 AM

How we use our brains, how we keep our brains healthy, how we learn and critically think, all have significant impact on our career success.

Susan Gingras Fitzell's curator insight, January 13, 2013 10:32 AM

How we use our brains, how we keep our brains healthy, how we learn and critically think, all have significant impact on our school success.

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The Science of Bad Neuroscience

The Science of Bad Neuroscience | Open Mind & Open Heart | Scoop.it

Oxford Neuroscientist Prof. Dorothy Bishop, or DeevyBee as she is known on Twitter, has performed an amazing open access lecture focusing largely on the misunderstanding of neuroscience. The talk is incredibly informative and digestible, even those with no understanding of neuroscience or psychology whatsoever will take a great deal away.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Your brain on video games [TEDTalks]

How do fast-paced video games affect the brain? Step into the lab with cognitive researcher Daphne Bavelier to hear surprising news about how video games, even action-packed shooter games, can help us learn, focus and, fascinatingly, multitask.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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cheyann keith's curator insight, February 21, 2014 1:02 PM

video  game make it easy for you 

Matija Sprogar's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:39 PM

Yeah, but just leap into the first multiplayer Mario platformer set in a 3D world! Play as Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, and Toad—each with their own special skills—in the all-new Sprixie Kingdom. At http://s.shr.lc/19obdCc

Sara SJagini's curator insight, May 5, 2014 7:22 AM

Action game players show better visual and attention skills than those who do not play video games

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[VIDEO] The Science of Lucid Dreaming

Have you ever wanted to take control of your dreams? Now you can, with the science of how to lucid dream! With these simple steps, and a little practice, you'll soon experience sleep like never before.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Brain's code for pronouncing vowels uncovered

Brain's code for pronouncing vowels uncovered | Open Mind & Open Heart | Scoop.it
Scientists have unraveled how our brain cells encode the pronunciation of individual vowels in speech. The discovery could lead to new technology that verbalizes the unspoken words of people paralyzed by injury or disease.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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