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Open Knowledge
All around Open Knowledge: Open Data, Open Government, Open Access, Open Science, Open Education, etc
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Helicopter to Work - Open Research: How to Organize for Content

Helicopter to Work - Open Research: How to Organize for Content | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Quality research and writing aside, what is most valuable about this report is that it’s actionable. It’s short on theory (which is a good thing), and long on utility. If you are looking to organize around content – that is, figure out how to staff a marketing department to operationalize the production, distribution and measurement of content – then this is the report for you.

One nitpick: Missing is the notion of demand generation. Of the many functions with which content marketing needs to align, demand generation is arguably foremost. A few months back, I asked prominent demand / content / inbound marketer Maria Pergolino (then of Marketo, now at Apttus), “Why are so many marketers with your skill set being snatched up to run marketing at growth companies?” She answered, “Because we know how to make them more money.” In the Venn diagram of marketing, content and demand intersect, and that intersection might just be the lushest terrain in today’s marketing landscape.

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Will MOOC Technology Break the Education Cartel?

Will MOOC Technology Break the Education Cartel? | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

It happened to the record industry first. While popular music had long been available on radio, it could be argued that a true music industry as we know it today didn’t arise until the 50‘s and 60‘s when distributable media and players became widely available. To summarize – you bought your music on record, then on 8-track, then on cassette, and then on CD once again. Sounds very much like a ‘cartel’, or “association of suppliers with the purpose of maintaining prices at a high level and restricting competition”. Record companies (not artists generally) held the content and the means of distributing it to us the passive consumer.

But that’s where technology turned. CD drives in computers plus early sharing software like Napster meant that instead of getting good at mashing the pause button on your stereo so recording to cassette stopped before the adds kicked in, you could rip a whole CD to MP3 in minutes and upload it for anyone who was also connected to the net. You could also bypass the record stores entirely by downloading songs, for free. It meant you didn’t have to buy your music a fourth time in some other format – you now controlled the file. No it wasn’t legal, but it was what the people wanted.

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Open Access and Professional Historians - PHA NSW

The issue of open access has grown from a fringe movement led by a few mathematicians and scientists to an issue that is being debated in academia throughout the western world.  Governments are taking notice and the United Kingdom is in the process of seeing a significant change in the manner in which academic journal articles are to be published.  The Australian Research Council has recently announced their open access policy.

We are in the midst of a profound change in the system of academic publishing. This is an issue that Australian historians cannot ignore.

What is ‘open access’?  It is recognition of the injustice to researchers who cannot access academic journal articles because of the prohibitive fees charged to people who do not belong to an institution with a library which pays the hefty subscriptions.  Academics in poorer institutions are not able to access vital research papers thus restricting their ability to conduct the kind of ground breaking research that will benefit humanity.  Most research in universities is funded by taxpayers.  Those same taxpayers then have to pay again, as much as $30 per article, to read about the research they funded.  Open access is about making academic journal articles freely open to anyone.

The Australian Historical Association has written a useful summary of the changes in Australia and how they affect Australian historians which we should all read.  The Australian Research Council (ARC) has recently announced their open access policy.  All publications arising from ARC funded projects from the beginning of this year must be deposited in an open access institutional repository within twelve months of publication.

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Reams of raw data are the tools of transparency

Reams of raw data are the tools of transparency | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

“Data” has become a buzzword in journalism in recent years, as technological advances have allowed for increased analysis, interpretation and presentation of the swathes of information now at our fingertips.

Data has always been part of the journalistic tool kit. But the volume and accessibility of data, combined with technological advances that help collect, analyse and clean data – as well as visualisation software, such as interactive maps – mean journalists, bloggers, web designers, statisticians and programmers are now able to analyse, contextualise and present data in new ways.

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luiy's curator insight, April 27, 2013 2:51 PM

Data journalism is increasingly part of the tool kit of ‘The Irish Times’. The Crime Statistics Ireland series last year saw us analyse recorded crime statistics for every Garda station in the country, using traditional journalism skills to give depth to the trends shown by the figures. What might otherwise have been just figures on a spreadsheet was brought to life by interactive tables that allowed irishtimes.com users to look at crime statistics from their local station.

 

Similarly, when the Government shut Garda stations earlier this year we were able to map the closures online, to help people visualise where the closures were taking place.

 

Data journalism also goes on behind the scenes; increasingly, stories that end up as words on a newspaper page begin their journey through the newsroom as numbers on a spreadsheet. It’s the job of our relatively new but growing team of data journalists to find the stories in the figures.

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What is OER (Open Educational Resource)? - EdTechReview

What is OER (Open Educational Resource)? - EdTechReview | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Open educational resources (OERs) are digital materials available for reuse and repurposing in teaching, researching and learning. These materials are made available for use, reuse, adaptation, and sharing through open licenses that allow them to be used through means not permitted under copyright, so the flow of knowledge is boundless.

In other words, Open educational resources (OERs) are free and openly licensed educational materials that can be used for teaching, learning, research, and other purposes.

Open educational resources (OER) can be anything from complete courses to recorded lectures, essay questions, discussion topics or reading lists. Teaching staff can 'pick and mix' these to suit their own purposes. 

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Information & Communications Technologies - G8 - Open Data for Agriculture

Information & Communications Technologies - G8 - Open Data for Agriculture | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

On April 29-30, the G8 International Conference on Open Data for Agriculture will bring together U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, U.S. Chief Technology Officer Todd Park, World Bank Vice President for Sustainable Development Rachel Kyte and experts in the field to explore more opportunities for open data and knowledge sharing that can help farmers and governments in Africa and around the globe protect their crops from pests and extreme weather, increase their yields, monitor water supplies, and anticipate planting seasons that are shifting with climate change.

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Explaining Open Access Journals with the Language of Math (for Those Who Like that Sort of Thing)

Explaining Open Access Journals with the Language of Math (for Those Who Like that Sort of Thing) | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

In my experience, the #1 confusion about open access journals (that is, “gold” open access journals, or journals that are made fully and immediately open access by their publishers) is the meaning of the word “open.”  Some mistakenly think that “open” has to do with how easy it is to publish in those journals.  But that is decidedly not the case.  No, the “open” in “open access journals” means that the journals make their content freely available online for all to read.

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Learn Experientially and Connect Globally with MOOCs

Learn Experientially and Connect Globally with MOOCs | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

There’s a new kid on the block that is changing how learning is designed, delivered and experienced. Called a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), it is making a big splash, with the potential to reshape education for learners, teachers and educational administrators alike.

These days, MOOCs are where it’s at. Mix together, an educational offering (which includes pedagogy for online education ); savvy marketing and a whole lot of hype for a compelling promise that a MOOC can reach vast numbers of people around the globe at an extremely affordable cost.

MOOCs can provide the offering educational institution or NGO tremendous with tremendous visibility, reach and access to a global constituency of learners at a fraction of the cost of traditional education, as well as the ability to package new course content and recycle older titles. Successful or not, MOOCs are altering how education (traditional and online education) is taught, managed and leveraged. They’re also creating new opportunities for democratizing learning, connecting learners, sharing and transferring knowledge, and monetizing education.

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Open Data Fellowship with Metropolitan New York Library Council Announced | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

Open Data Fellowship with Metropolitan New York Library Council Announced | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Exciting news: The Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) in collaboration with the Open Knowledge Foundation’s OpenGLAM initiative and Wikimedia NYC have today unveiled the first ever Open Data Fellowship for cultural heritage institutions starting this summer. The paid 8-week placement will combine two roles:

Facilitator for institutions interested in pursuing broader open data initiativesWikipedian-in-Residence for member institutions in the METRO consortium
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What Is The Future Of Open Government? | The DOBT Blog

What Is The Future Of Open Government? | The DOBT Blog | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

A couple weeks ago, President Obama announced a new research initiative to map the human brain – making a significant investment of $100 Million Dollars to prevent, treat and cure brain injuries.

This is a website called Sam.gov. It launched late last year, and it’s the central hub responsible for all the databases behind government contracting. The GAO estimates that this website will cost the taxpayer $181 Million dollars.

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CFP: Workshop on Open Gov Data Standardisation @Informatik2013 - EXTENDED Deadline

CFP: Workshop on Open Gov Data Standardisation @Informatik2013 - EXTENDED Deadline | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The Workshops goal is to give answers, identify missing expertise and sketch a process model to the following questions:

Would OGD in a DACH/pan-European/global context benefit of a standardisation process on the technical layer or does the promise of Linked Data suffice to agree on the semantic layer?What is the current status quo of standardisation in different countries?Which organisational processes are in place in those countries to support OGD standardisation?Would the topic of OGD benefit of a cross-country standardisation approach? Would an European, overarching approach help to quicker realize the promised benefits of OGD (economic growth, strengthen democratic institutions, more informed thus qualitative decisions)Standards now and in the future: Which importance will the ongoing standardisation efforts of OGD have in the future?
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EUROPA - PRESS RELEASES - Press Release - Vassiliou welcomes launch of first pan-European university MOOCs (massive open online courses)

EUROPA - PRESS RELEASES - Press Release - Vassiliou welcomes launch of first pan-European university MOOCs (massive open online courses) | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Partners in 11 countries have joined forces to launch the first pan-European 'MOOCs' (Massive Open Online Courses) initiative, with the support of the European Commission. MOOCs are online university courses which enable people to access quality education without having to leave their homes. Around 40 courses, covering a wide variety of subjects, will be available free of charge and in 12 different languages. The initiative is led by the European Association of Distance Teaching Universities (EADTU) and mostly involves open universities. The partners are based in the following countries: France, Italy, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, UK, Russia, Turkey and Israel. Detailed information about the initiative and the courses on offer is available on the portal www.OpenupEd.eu.

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Doing science in the open, 2013 edition

Open science is about sharing — papers, data, software, ideas… Sharing promotes replicability, transparency, knowledge accumulation, love…
But it is only meaningful when open standards are implemented. Examples:

If you share your code in E-Prime, I can only use it if I own a copy of E-Prime ($795). That’s not very useful.If you publish a paper under a traditional license, I can read it but cannot (easily) reuse your data or figures.

General idea — Use tools that are as independent as possible:

Mature tools are preferred to beta since the developer(s) might abandon the projectFree and open source (F/OSS) projects are preferred to proprietary because you can trust the code, change it to your needs and it will never vanish.Text files are more accessible than binary files since the latter may require proprietary software to use them.

Note: This is a general preference, not absolute. Your particular problem might have different requirements.

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PLOS Biology: Citation Advantage of Open Access Articles

PLOS Biology: Citation Advantage of Open Access Articles | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Open access (OA) to the research literature has the potential to accelerate recognition and dissemination of research findings, but its actual effects are controversial. This was a longitudinal bibliometric analysis of a cohort of OA and non-OA articles published between June 8, 2004, and December 20, 2004, in the same journal (PNAS: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). Article characteristics were extracted, and citation data were compared between the two groups at three different points in time: at “quasi-baseline” (December 2004, 0–6 mo after publication), in April 2005 (4–10 mo after publication), and in October 2005 (10–16 mo after publication).

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European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning

Higher education institutions face a number of opportunities and challenges as the result of the digital revolution. The institutions perform a number of scholarship functions which can be affected by new technologies, and the desire is to retain these functions where appropriate, whilst the form they take may change. Much of the reaction to technological change comes from those with a vested interest in either wholesale change or maintaining the status quo. Taking the resilience metaphor from ecology, the authors propose a framework for analysing an institution’s ability to adapt to digital challenges. This framework is examined at two institutions (the UK Open University and Canada’s Athabasca University) using two current digital challenges, namely Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and Open Access publishing.

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Reinhart-Rogoff revisited: Coding errors happen - key problem was in not making the data openly available from the start

Reinhart-Rogoff revisited: Coding errors happen - key problem was in not making the data openly available from the start | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The eventual replication of the data from the Reinhart-Rogoff paper on 90% debt/GDP threshold has sparked vibrant discussion on the impact of error-ridden research on austerity policies around the world. Velichka Dimitrova argues this controversy highlights the importance of open data of economics datasets. Coding errors happen, yet the greater research problem was not allowing for other researchers to review and replicate the results through making the data openly available as early as possible.

Another economics scandal made the news last week. Harvard Kennedy School professor Carmen Reinhart and Harvard University professor Kenneth Rogoff argued in their 2010 NBER paper that economic growth slows down when the debt/GDP ratio exceeds the threshold of 90 percent of GDP. These results were also published in one of the most prestigious economics journals – the American Economic Review (AER) – and had a powerful resonance in a period of serious economic and public policy turmoil when governments around the world slashed spending in order to decrease the public deficit and stimulate economic growth.

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Open access: four ways it could enhance academic freedom

Open access: four ways it could enhance academic freedom | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Are politicians stealing our academic freedom? Is their fetish with open access publishing leading to a 'pay to say' system for the rich? And will the trendy goal of making publicly financed research freely available skew the world of scholarship even further towards the natural sciences? I don't think so. But it took me a while to get there.

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Berners-Lee Unveils Details Of Web Foundation Research at OGP Meeting

Apr 25, 2013 at 2:33 am • Dillon Mann

Speaking at an Open Government Partnership reception last night in London, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, founder of the World Wide Web Foundation (Web Foundation) and inventor of the Web, unveiled details of the first ever in-depth study into how the power of open data could be harnessed to tackle social challenges in the developing world. The 14 country study is funded by Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and will be overseen by the Web Foundation’s world-leading open data experts. An interim progress update will be made at an October 2013 meeting of the Open Government Partnership, with in-depth results expected in 2014.

‘Exploring the Emerging Impacts of Open Data in Developing Countries’ (ODDC) will assess how access to large-scale datasets can contribute to more accountable public spending, better urban governance and better sanitation and education, among other topics. The need for such research was discussed at the first Open Government Partnership plenary in Brazil last April, with 17 case studies selected for further study thereafter via a global competition. Researchers gathered in London this week to discuss their projects, plan their research and identify key topics to address across all the cases. The case study findings will be compared and synthesised, contributing to the development and testing of common methods and tools for designing and evaluating open data initiatives.

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Italy's Open Data Self-Evaluation | European Public Sector Information Platform

Italy's Open Data Self-Evaluation | European Public Sector Information Platform | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The Italian Dati.gov.it portal assesses its performance in infographics.

 

More than 5,700 datasets are currently available in open format in Italy, but where do they come from? What do they communicate? What kind of licenses do they respond to? The Italian government's Open Data portal reflects on the status of open data through a series of infographics that answer the following questions:

-How much open data is there in Italy?

-Where is Italian data stored?

-Who issues datasets?

-What levels of government release open data?

-What kind of licenses are being used?

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Linked Science 2013 workshop will be arranged in Sydney, Australia late October LinkedScience.org | interconnecting scientific assets!

We will organize the 3rd International Workshop on Linked Science 2013 (LISC2013) in Sydney, Australia on October 21st or 22nd.

The specific theme of the Linked Science workshop this year will be “Supporting Reproducibility, Scientific Investigations and Experiments”.  Workshop will be collocated with the 12th International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC2013).

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Frictionless Data: making it radically easier to get stuff done with data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

Frictionless Data: making it radically easier to get stuff done with data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

This isn’t about building a big datastore or a data management system – it’s simply saving people from repeating all the same tasks of discovering a dataset, getting it into a format they can use, cleaning it up – all before they can do anything useful with it! If you’ve ever spent the first half of a hackday just tidying up tabular data and getting it ready to use, Frictionless Data is for you.

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80 Open Education Resource (OER) Tools for Publishing and Development Initiatives | OEDb

80 Open Education Resource (OER) Tools for Publishing and Development Initiatives | OEDb | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Many Open Education Resources (OER) have been introduced by governments, universities, and individuals within the past few years. OERs provide teaching and learning materials that are freely available and offered online for anyone to use. Whether you're an instructor, student, or self-learner, you have access to full courses, modules, syllabi, lectures, assignments, quizzes, activities, games, simulations, and tools to create these components.

While some OERs include OpenCourseWare (OCW) or other educational materials, they may also offer the means to alter those courses through editing, adding to those courses through publication, and the ability to shape the tools that share those resources. Additionally, they may maintain forums or other platforms where individuals can collaborate on building educational tools and documentation and the reach for those materials.

To that end, the list below — arranged in alphabetical order — includes 80 online resources that you can use to learn how to build or participate in a collaborative educational effort that focuses on publication and development of those materials. Although some choices focus solely on publication, development, or tools used to accomplish either effort, some provide multifaceted venues that offer communities in which to collaborate on one or all of these efforts. Collaborators can include institutions, colleges or universities, educators, students, or the general public.

This list is not all-inclusive, as resources that offer limited collaboration were excluded. Two examples include the University of North Carolina's Open Courseware Lab and the Maricopa Learning Exchange, as both facilities make their information public but collaboration is limited to educators within those colleges. Other sites were nonfunctional when this article was written, so information about their offerings was unavailable for this project. Finally, resources that focus solely on K-12 education were saved for another time and place. The resources below focus solely on higher education or encompass all levels of education.

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Building the foundation for an Open Data Directory | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

Building the foundation for an Open Data Directory | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Upon discussions with many in the Open Data community, an initial analysis of their own project needs and preliminary research on existing public resources, the Web Foundation believes that the community at large would benefit from a central entry point to Open Data related resources at a neutral source, the Open Data Directory (ODD).

This ODD will help to produce clear evidence base of the benefits of Open Data holding a wide range of resources types such as: use cases, case studies, stories and anecdotes, methodologies, strategies, business cases, papers, reports, articles, blog posts, training materials, slide sets, software tools, applications and visualisations. The directory will not focus on compiling a vast number of references; instead it will give priority to high-quality references endorsed by the Open Data community.

As a first step towards the ODD, we are making public the Use Cases and Requirements Draft in order to get comments from the wide community, not only on the content of the document itself but also on the overall idea of the ODD. We’ve published it as a Google Document with comments turned on. This is a tool for you, the Open Data community, so suggestions, feedback and comments are very welcome.

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Worldwide Research Collaboration Mapped Out | Mendeley Blog

Worldwide Research Collaboration Mapped Out | Mendeley Blog | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Mendeley is involved in several research projects. Particularly fruitful has been an on-going exchange of researchers and Mendeley staff between our London HQ and the Know-Center at Graz University of Technology in Austria. All projects aim to contribute to the improved use of the wealth of Mendeley data for the benefit of our users and the scientific community in general.

Unsurprisingly perhaps, this recent investigation of research collaboration started as a Hack Day project between Mendeley staff and a visiting researcher from the Know-Center/TU Graz in the context of the TEAM project (http://team-project.tugraz.at) which is coordinated by the Knowledge Management Institute of the TU Graz. Sebastian Pöhlmann (Insights and Analytics Manager) and Piotr Drozd (Community and Business Intelligence Analyst) teamed up with Peter Kraker (PhD student, Know-Center/TU Graz) to visualise cross-country collaboration on the Mendeley platform.

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The Foundation for Open Access Statistics

The Foundation for Open Access Statistics | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

This week, Jan de Leeuw (Founder and Editor in Chief of JSS) announced a new initiative: The Foundation for Open Access Statistics. The mission of FOAS is to promote free software, open access publishing, and reproducible research in statistics. One immediate goal is to develop a more stable support structure for JSS to guarantee its continued existence and growth. Perhaps in the future, activities can be extended beyond JSS. Membership of FOAS is free, donations are appreciated. Readers of JSS are highly recommended to pay a visit to the FOAS website, and perhaps consider joining and/or making a contribution in one way or another. This can be the first step in shaping a more sustainable and scalable future for JSS. Thereby, the journal can continue to grow, and our community can stay a leader and role model in accessible, reproducible research.

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