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All around Open Knowledge: Open Data, Open Government, Open Access, Open Science, Open Education, etc
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Rescooped by Irina Radchenko from Open Educational Resources (OER)
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Don Olcott: New Pathways to Learning – OER and Non-formal Education

Don Olcott: New Pathways to Learning – OER and Non-formal Education | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The growth of non-formal education is expanding teaching and learning pathways for the delivery of global education. This growth, in concert with the expanded use of Open Educational Resources (OERs), is creating a potential synergy between non-formal education and OERs to strengthen the continuum of education and training for people who live in underserved and economically disadvantaged regions of the world. The author’s central theme is that OERs provide a valuable educational resource for use in non-formal education that needs to be expanded, researched and refined. OERs are not formal or non-formal resources. Rather, it is how OERs are used in formal and non-formal education settings that define their context and application for teaching and learning.


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sofipapadi's curator insight, April 11, 2013 1:29 AM

OERs provide a valuable educational resource for use in non-formal education that needs to be expanded, researched and refined. Rather, it is how OERs are used in formal and non-formal education settings that define their context and application for teaching and learning.

Angela C. Dowd's curator insight, April 12, 2013 1:28 PM

I like the idea of enrichment and opportunity for all. This sounds like it will benefit everyone. We can all learn from one another. Some people who live in underserved and economically disadvangaged regions of the world have a lot to teach us about inner strength and perseverance. Also... think of the cultural awareness this will bring.

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For Scientists, an Exploding World of Pseudo-Academia

For Scientists, an Exploding World of Pseudo-Academia | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The scientists who were recruited to appear at a conference called Entomology-2013 thought they had been selected to make a presentation to the leading professional association of scientists who study insects.

 

Denise Grady profiles Elizabeth H. Blackburn, a Nobel laureate in medicine who thinks the ends of your DNA might hold the key to long-term health. John Markoff talks possible tech revolution in the form of new flexible circuits. Gina Kolata on the murky world of nonprofessional science publishing.

 

But they found out the hard way that they were wrong. The prestigious, academically sanctioned conference they had in mind has a slightly different name: Entomology 2013 (without the hyphen). The one they had signed up for featured speakers who were recruited by e-mail, not vetted by leading academics. Those who agreed to appear were later charged a hefty fee for the privilege, and pretty much anyone who paid got a spot on the podium that could be used to pad a résumé.

“I think we were duped,” one of the scientists wrote in an e-mail to the Entomological Society.

 

Those scientists had stumbled into a parallel world of pseudo-academia, complete with prestigiously titled conferences and journals that sponsor them. Many of the journals and meetings have names that are nearly identical to those of established, well-known publications and events.

Steven Goodman, a dean and professor of medicine at Stanford and the editor of the journal Clinical Trials, which has its own imitators, called this phenomenon “the dark side of open access,” the movement to make scholarly publications freely available.

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Elsevier scoops up startup Mendeley in controversial bet on open science

Elsevier scoops up startup Mendeley in controversial bet on open science | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Publishing giant Elsevier has acquired Mendeley, a London-based startup that provides social collaboration tools for academics and researchers. The deal was confirmed on Monday after rumors of the transaction leaked months ago, and The Financial Times reports that the buyer has forked over £45 million ($68.85 million) for the London-based startup.

A rising star of the open science and crowdsourcing movements, Mendeley provides free and paid apps that let researchers and scientists share, store and organize content such as journal articles in PDF files. Millions of users have come to depend on the company's apps to cull the most relevant items from the sea of research info online. Some advocates for open science criticized the sale to Elsevier, skeptical that the scientific publisher would support the mission of Mendeley to make research information widely accessible and social.

 

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Open access academia

Open access academia | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

In the late 19th century, when prestigious journals such as Science, Nature and others first appeared, their exclusive subscription-based business models made sense. The readership for scientific scholarship was limited, and each copy a journal printed represented a cost to the publisher. As a consequence of this, a second feature of the scientific journal was born: in order to keep costs down and subscriptions up, they agreed to publish only those articles they felt would be of greatest interest to the scientific community.

 

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Dealing with Data: Science Librarians’ Participation in Data Management at Association of Research Libraries Institutions

As long as empirical research has existed, researchers have been doing “data management” in one form or another. However, funding agency mandates for doing formal data management are relatively recent, and academic libraries’ involvement has been concentrated mainly in the last few years. The National Science Foundation implemented a new mandate in January, 2011, requiring researchers to include a data management plan with their proposals for funding. This has prompted many academic libraries to work more actively than before in data management, and science librarians in particular are uniquely poised to step into new roles to meet researchers’ data management needs. This study, a survey of science librarians at institutions affiliated with the Association of Research Libraries, investigates science librarians’ awareness of and involvement in institutional repositories, data repositories, and data management support services at their institutions. The study also explores the roles and responsibilities, both new and traditional, that science librarians have assumed related to data management, and the skills that science librarians believe are necessary to meet the demands of data management work. The results reveal themes of both uncertainty and optimism – uncertainty about the roles of librarians, libraries, and other campus entities; uncertainty about the skills that will be required; but also optimism about applying “traditional” librarian skills to this emerging field of academic librarianship.

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Why I’ll keep using Mendeley…for now

Why I’ll keep using Mendeley…for now | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Well, it finally happened…Mendeley has been acquired by Elsevier. This shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. Mendeley has never been open source (“free” does not equal “open source”), they’ve always been a commercial company and have never suggested that they were anything else. This day was always coming.

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OpenGLAM Principles | OpenGLAM

OpenGLAM Principles | OpenGLAM | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Note: This is the first version of the OpenGLAM principles which we have drafted together with the OpenGLAM Working Group. We would like this to be a community effort so please give feedback on the OpenGLAM mailing list! 

Galleries, libraries, archives and museums have an important role in supporting the advance of humanity’s knowledge. They have traditionally been the gatekeepers of the our cultural heritage and in their collections they hold the record of mankind.

The internet affords cultural heritage institutions a radical new opportunity to engage global audiences and make their collections more discoverable and connected than ever, allowing users not only to enjoy the riches of the world’s memory institutions, but also to contribute, participate and share.

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Welcome to the European Data Forum 2013

Welcome to the European Data Forum 2013 | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The European Data Forum (EDF) 2013 takes place on April 9-10, 2013 in Dublin, Ireland in the Croke Park Conference Centre. It is the annual meeting-point for data practitioners from industry, research, the public-sector and the community, to discuss the opportunities and challenges of the emerging Big Data Economy in Europe.

The EDF 2013 will comprise of keynotes from global experts in the field, a series of submitted talks, as well as a trends, showcase and live networking sessions. Topics include Linked Data, Open Data, and Big Data, with the aim to bring together all stakeholders involved in the data value chain to exchange ideas and develop actionable roadmaps addressing these challenges and opportunities to strengthen the European data economy and its positioning worldwide.

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Why Online Programs Fail, and 5 Things We Can Do About It | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Why Online Programs Fail, and 5 Things We Can Do About It | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Online learning in its current iterations will fail.

The failure of online education programs is not logistical, nor political, nor economic: it’s cultural, rooted in our perspectives and biases about how learning happens and how the internet works (these things too often seen in opposition). For learning to change drastically -- a trajectory suggested but not yet realized by the rise of MOOCs -- teaching must change drastically. And in order for that to happen, we must conceive of the activity of teaching, as an occupation and preoccupation, in entirely new and unexpected ways. We must unseat ourselves, unnerve ourselves. Online learning is uncomfortable, and so educators must become uncomfortable in their positions as teachers and pedagogues. And the administration of online programs must follow suit.

It’s important for us to be very specific about what we mean by failure. There are two kinds of failure we want to discuss here. The first kind of failure -- an improper failure -- does damage, breeds limitations, shuts down critical thinking, and disengages us from our pedagogical or learning processes. Our ethical commitment to students and the enterprise of education is too strong to abide this kind of failure.

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Heather Thompson's curator insight, April 9, 2013 7:00 PM

This looks a very interesting site focussing on pedagogy

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Co-Creation of Government Services | Promoting Information and Communications for Development (IC4D)

Co-Creation of Government Services | Promoting Information and Communications for Development (IC4D) | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it
As part of our proposed framework on Building Smarter Cities, a set of activities aimed at creating "bottom-up" innovations have been proposed. These activities are aimed at leveraging existing technologies to solve current citizen problems. In order to do so, Design Thinking needs to be integrated into the process, which allows for constant learning, iteration, and a solution that is co-created by the users themselves. This, however, is often difficult to do in government projects. (I wrote a post some time ago about the challenges that Design Thinking poses on government).

 

The proposed process for engaging in these “bottom up” activities is shown above.  An innovation team within governments and/or cities will be tasked with leading these co-creation exercises, with active participation of academia, private sector, government, and citizens at large.
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Juan Luis Jimeno's curator insight, April 9, 2013 3:54 AM

Un artículo muy interesante en el que se reflexiona sobre los procesos de co-creación de servicios públicos como una de las claves para la construcción de una ciudadanía inteligente y, por ende, una ciudad inteligente. Bottom-up y open-innovation, también son palabras clave en el Open Government.

Iñaki Agirre's curator insight, April 9, 2013 8:57 AM

Design Thinking for governments and citizens

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Open Education 2030 » Lifelong Learning

Thanks to all authors for their inspiring thoughts on how Open Education may look like in 2030, when considered from the perspective of Lifelong Learning. We were pleased to receive 16 vision papers in reply to our  call, all of them insightful and inspiring. Interestingly, the papers are quite diverse, not only in style and approach, but also in content. We left the call open, on purpose, hence these different views, but it will help us to further shape and prioritise the foresight exercise. This is just a first step. Have a look for yourselves: Below are the 16 contributions in alphabetical order.

We are very pleased with all papers and grateful to all authors for the time and effort they devoted to thinking about Open Education 2030. It was difficult for the selection committee to decide on the “winners”,but a decision had to be made, because places for the workshop are limited. Congratulations to the authors of the six contributions that were finally selected! 

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EsdeGroot's curator insight, April 24, 2013 3:47 PM

Holiday reading, all those essays....

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Elsevier welcomes Mendeley | Elsevier Connect

Elsevier welcomes Mendeley | Elsevier Connect | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

Think about it: researchers use Mendeley for its document and reference management, collaboration, analytics and networking tools.  Elsevier not only publishes almost a fifth of the world’s scientific, technical and medical (STM) content, we also have a successful track record with indexing content from multiple publishers on researchers’ behalves through tools such as Scopus, Scirus and Reaxys.

For Elsevier, we can build upon strong foundations in search and discovery by adding capabilities in document and citation management and sharing. By offering integration between Mendeley, Scopus and ScienceDirect, we can make this combined platform the central workflow and collaboration site for authors. In addition, we will be able to provide greater access to a growing repository of user-generated content while building tools that will enable researchers to search this growing body of research more precisely.

By joining forces, we will be in an even better position to support the needs of researchers. Our resources will enable Mendeley to continue building on its platform, keeping it free for individuals while introducing new content and interoperability that will make it even more useful.

This partnership can have a huge positive impact on areas such as altmetrics, getting real-time information on hot articles across publishers based on Mendeley readership metrics, helping librarians assess their collections and rendering all publishers’ content more discoverable.

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Building the Digital Public Library of America

Building the Digital Public Library of America | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The Digital Public Library of America will launch on April 18 after two and a half years of careful planning and preparation. The project known as DPLA is the first national effort that seeks to aggregate existing records in state and regional digital libraries so that they are searchable from a single portal. Up until now, the documents that tell the story of our nation’s history and cultural heritage have largely been siloed in state and local libraries, museums, and archives. Some institutions have the ability to digitize those valuable materials and put them online, but strained budgets mean that most do not.

The project’s funding will also allow it to work with local communities to digitize their cultural-heritage—preserving them for the future and bringing them online as part of our first national digital library.

DPLA will bring together access to a diverse host of materials that were once stored on a patchwork of different websites, or not online at all, including newspapers, photographs, letters, newsreels, oral histories, manuscripts, books and public records. This could be a game changer for academic researchers and historians, who will be able to see more apparent connections between various local histories, perhaps for the first time. Students, teachers and amateur historians will be able to peruse DPLA’s rich exhibits and learn about their own history and genealogy. And local communities will see their history preserved rather than lost to the deterioration of time.
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Rescooped by Irina Radchenko from Massively MOOC
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Use of blended learning & the journey to adopt MOOC at HKPolyU

Eric Tsui's presentation at the Global Mindset Conference - Future of Higher Education & Skills Training in the Australasian Region – ‘Massive Open Online C

Via Learning Environments, Peter Mellow
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Open for Learning: The CMS and the Open Learning Network | in education

Open for Learning: The CMS and the Open Learning Network | in education | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The course management system (CMS) reinforces the status quo and hinders substantial teaching and learning innovation in higher education. It does so by imposing artificial time limits on learner access to course content and other learners, privileging the role of the instructor at the expense of the learner, and limiting the power of the network effect in the learning process. The open learning network (OLN)—a hybrid of the CMS and the personal learning environment (PLE)—is proposed as an alternative learning technology environment with the potential to leverage the affordances of the Web to dramatically improve learning.

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Will open access to research achieve transparency? Your responses, please

Will open access to research achieve transparency? Your responses, please | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The UK's minister for universities and science has taken a special interest in open access to journal articles. He chooses to talk about access to academic publications as enacting a particular principle of transparency. I cannot disagree with the principle. In fact I used the same line about sunshine as the best disinfectant when writing about the need for great access to scientific data. Although I attributed the phrase to the early 20th Century US Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, not David Cameron.

But there are two missing links in Willetts's argument.

First, if sunlight is a disinfectant, then transparent government is meant to keep something clean. But the motivation for open access here is to enable more business access to research output. It is different to sharing surgeons' success rates to allow for greater scrutiny of public services or the Treasury's spending data so that anyone can get a handle on public spending. This is about creating economic opportunity not public accountability.

There is at least an uncomfortable fit between open access and the main thrust of the government's transparency programme. (Admittedly, David Cameron's announcement of the second part of his programme was more explicitly aimed at the economic opportunities from open data. But he used the line about disinfectant to praise the philosophy behind Wikileaks.)

Second, a taxpayers' "right to roam" in academic journals is not the same as a right-to-understand, to re-use, to make-something-of. Just because in four years' time I will be able mull over 75% of the UK's research output, it doesn't mean I will understand any more of it. Nor does it mean that small companies will either, let alone turn it into a product or service. Access to the written output of research is only part of true transparency.

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Socrata’s Momentum Helps Drive Open Data Adoption Worldwide

Socrata, a Seattle-based cloud software company focused exclusively on democratizing access to government data, today announced strong quarterly results that demonstrate how the company is accelerating open data adoption around the world.

A Host of New Customer Wins

Over the past two quarters, Socrata has added a host of new customers, including: the State of New York, Atlanta, Oakland, Salt Lake City, Kansas City (MO), Raleigh, Madison (WI), San Mateo County (CA), Travis County (TX), Snohomish County (WA), and Redmond (WA); as well as the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Government, and Halifax and the Province of Alberta in Canada.

These organizations join other forward-thinking Socrata customers like New York City, Chicago, San Francisco, the State of Maryland, the State of Hawaii, the State of Washington, the World Bank, Medicare, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, United Nations Development Programme, and the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

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Open Corporates plans to 'have a URL for every company in the world' (Wired UK)

Open Corporates plans to 'have a URL for every company in the world' (Wired UK) | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it
Open Corporates is on a mission to make corporate information easily accessible to the masses
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Datasets - ENUMERATE Data Platform

Datasets - ENUMERATE Data Platform | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

ENUMERATE is a EC-funded project, led by Collections Trust in the UK.  The primary objective of ENUMERATE is to create a reliable baseline of statistical data about digitization, digital preservation and online access to cultural heritage in Europe. Currently, statistical data on Europe’s digital heritage is tentative and scattered at best. For the European Commission and many of the agencies and actors in the field of culture there is no consistent evidence base for making strategic decisions on investments in digitisation. ENUMERATE will bring about major improvements in the quality and availability of intelligence about digital heritage.

 

 

A consortium of ten partners is at the heart of the ENUMERATE 'Thematic Network'. Together they will initiate a Europe-wide community of practice to share statistical data and knowledge on the progress of digitisation. This will be achieved by a multi-annual programme of coordinated surveys. There will be wide-scale harmonized statistical data-gathering and more in-depth surveying of digitization activities by European cultural heritage institutions.  All activities of ENUMERATE start from the principle that heritage institutions will receive useful information in return for sharing their data. Results will be published on an open data platform, where raw and summary data can be viewed and collated by interested parties.

 

ENUMERATE builds on the results of the NUMERIC project (2007-2009). This was a ground breaking initiative to create a framework for the gathering of statistical data on digital cultural heritage. ENUMERATE will improve and refine the methodology from NUMERIC and will bring the data online for re-use. ENUMERATE will also take into account the results of a recent study of Collections Trust into the costs of digitising Europe’s cultural heritage.

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Promoting open access at the federal level - The Tech

With the increasingly prohibitive cost to access scientific journal articles and the significant amount of research that is funded by the U.S. government, many scientists and taxpayers support measures that increase public access to the results of federally funded research. This “open access” movement aims to establish a policy for federally-funded research to become publicly accessible after an established period of time post-publication, usually within one year. Because this research is funded by U.S. taxpayers, we believe that it is reasonable to expect free access to the fruits of our investment.

Furthermore, in addition to enabling taxpayers to have access to research that they have funded, open access policies enhance opportunities for innovation in this country by allowing more people to utilize existing research. Small businesses, startups, and independent inventors often cannot afford expensive journal subscription packages but would use relatively recent research if it were made available, potentially enhancing competitiveness and economic output. Open access also supports education for high school students, undergraduates and graduate students, whose institutions may not be able to afford extensive journal subscriptions.

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Open Research Data Handbook – Call for case Studies | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

Open Research Data Handbook – Call for case Studies | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The OKF Open Research Data Handbook – a collaborative and volunteer-led guide to Open Research Data practices – is beginning to take shape and we need you! We’re looking for case studies showing benefits from open research data: either researchers who have personal stories to share or people with relevant expertise willing to write short sections.

Designed to provide an introduction to open research data, we’re looking to develop a resource that will explain what open research data actually is, the benefits of opening up research data, as well as the processes and tools which researchers need to do so, giving examples from different academic disciplines.

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OpenEMIS v.2- UNESCO launches a new generic and open source Education Management Information System (EMIS) | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

OpenEMIS v.2- UNESCO launches a new generic and open source Education Management Information System (EMIS) | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it
UNESCO launched a new version of OpenEMIS, a generic and open source Education Management information System (EMIS) software package issued without conditions or restrictions for use by countries.

Able to run offline on desktop computers or on the web and on mobile devises, OpenEMIS facilitates the collection, processing, analysis and supports the dissemination of data on education systems. It is a tool conceived to be easily and quickly adapted to the needs of information producers and users at national and sub-national levels. 

It manages a broad range of information: data on student enrolment, teachers, non-teaching staff, classes, textbooks, infrastructure, finances and learning outcomes.  

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Coursera begins to make money | Inside Higher Ed

Coursera begins to make money | Inside Higher Ed | Open Knowledge | Scoop.it

The Silicon Valley-based company brought in $220,000 in the first quarter after it started charging for verified completion certificates, its co-founders said. The company also receives revenue from an Amazon.com affiliates program if users buy books suggested by professors.

“It’s the beginning of revenue,” said a Coursera co-founder, Daphne Koller.

The company has 3.2 million registered users, an increase of nearly 700,000 from mid-February. The company was founded in fall 2011 by Koller and her colleague at Stanford University, Andrew Ng. 

The vast majority of users are just dropping in to take free courses, but the company introduced a “Signature Track” to try to put more weight behind the end-of-course awards issued by universities that offer courses through its platform. Users who pay for this have to submit a photo ID of themselves to the company and are also tracked based on their “unique typing pattern” to ensure that people who take tests or turn in assignments are who they say they are. Prices are set around $50 so far.




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Ralph Springett's curator insight, April 9, 2013 4:16 AM

No suprises here. I think this is a good move. The key will be to have a robust enough accreditation process that it can be recognised in industry. 

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Webinar Friday, April 12, 2013, 2:00 PM ET - Instructional Materials: Making the shift from print to digital

Join SETDA to learn how states and districts are moving from print to digital instructional materials and participate in a demonstration of the State Education Policy Center to learn how to access details about state policies related to broadband, assessment and instructional materials.There will be a facilitated discussion during which state and district leaders will share examples of their use of digital content in schools and classrooms.


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theopenbook.org.uk

From makerspaces to data wrangling schools to archives, the digital is being remixed by the open – and it is changing society as we know it. New concepts about public information, transparency and the Commons are combining in unprecedented ways, resulting in a breadth of transformative collaborations across the globe.

The Open Book explores the social and technological manifestations of this emergent movement for the first time. It features 25 in-depth thought pieces written by pioneers of openness around the world from London to São Paulo, including the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Rufus Pollock, the Free Software Foundation’s Karsten Gerloff, Open Data Manchester’s Julian Tate, IBM’s Ville Peltola, the Centre for Sustainable Communications’Jorge Luis Zapico, The Guardian’s Simon Rogers, the Open Hardware Summit’s Catarina Mota, Open Design Now‘s Peter Troxler and the Harvard Berkman Centre for Internet & Society’s Mayo Fuster Morell.

Each of these contributions explore a unique aspect of the open knowledge movement and how it has affected work, society and culture across paradigms, from government to business to design to education. Also included is “The Evolution of Open Knowledge”, the world’s first crowdsourced timeline of openness and transparency from 1425 to the current day.

The Open Book is an essential reference point for those interested in the culmination of a global movement for change in a time of rapid social progress.

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