open-ended processes
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open-ended processes
1 Not restrained by definite limits, restrictions, or structure. 2 Allowing for or adaptable to change. 3 Allowing for a spontaneous, unstructured response
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Esther Duflo: Social experiments to fight poverty

http://www.ted.com Alleviating poverty is more guesswork than science, and lack of data on aid's impact raises questions about how to provide it. 

Esther Duflo says it's possible to know which development efforts help and which hurt -- by testing solutions with randomized trials.

 

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Atul Gawande: How do we heal medicine?

http://www.ted.com Our medical systems are broken. Doctors are capable of extraordinary (and expensive) treatments, but they are losing their core focus: act...

 

we cannot know it all, anymore, can we make systems work? and if yes how?

in almost all our territories of knowledge and specialization we are past the time of "cowboys" and entering the time of "pit crews".... important results from the experience of a top surgeon. 

starwalker's insight:

Brilliant and important talk, if you did not see it take the time...

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Worldmapper World Population Atlas: The countries of the world as you've never seen them before

Worldmapper World Population Atlas: The countries of the world as you've never seen them before | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
The World Population Atlas: The countries of the world as you've never seen them before
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Beautiful maps of each country according to population densities. quite enlightening perspective

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Emergent Sensing of Complex Environments by Mobile Animal Groups

Science 1 February 2013: 
Vol. 339 no. 6119 pp. 574-576 
DOI: 10.1126/science.1225883

 

ABSTRACT

The capacity for groups to exhibit collective intelligence is an often-cited advantage of group living. Previous studies have shown that social organisms frequently benefit from pooling imperfect individual estimates. However, in principle, collective intelligence may also emerge from interactions between individuals, rather than from the enhancement of personal estimates. Here, we reveal that this emergent problem solving is the predominant mechanism by which a mobile animal group responds to complex environmental gradients. Robust collective sensing arises at the group level from individuals modulating their speed in response to local, scalar, measurements of light and through social interaction with others. This distributed sensing requires only rudimentary cognition and thus could be widespread across biological taxa, in addition to being appropriate and cost-effective for robotic agents.

 


Via Complexity Digest, A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
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Shady El Damaty's curator insight, February 4, 2013 6:22 AM

Fascinating paper published in February's edition of Science. We often consider intelligence as an emergent phenomena at the scale of individual organisms.  Yet, complex social systems and structures may also exhibit behavior reflecting the predispositions of its members as a whole.  Perhaps we can view the dynamics of societies from this scaled perspective to better understand the issues facing our modern society.

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Planificación

Planificación | open-ended processes | Scoop.it

Andres Ricardo Schuschny, Planificacion Estrategica,

 

Las siguientes son las presentaciones preparadas para el curso de planificación estratégica que, desde el 2006, dicto para la Maestría en Gestión Pública de la Universidad de Santiago de Chile. A m...

 

complexity and public management

interesting course

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Kevin Allocca: Why videos go viral

http://www.ted.com Kevin Allocca is YouTube's trends manager, and he has deep thoughts about silly web video. In this talk from TEDYouth, he shares the 4 reasons why a video goes viral...

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David Weinberger on Too Big To Know

We used to know how to know. Get some experts, maybe a methodology, add some criteria and credentials, publish the results, and you get knowledge we can all ...
starwalker's insight:

An interesting talk on how the architecture of knowledge was influenced along 2500 years by the media of paper, more than we could dear to imagine, and how the hyper linked structure of  internet has transformed all that. Skulls don't scale, networks do, knowledge does.


"We used to know how to know. Get some experts, maybe a methodology, add some criteria and credentials, publish the results, and you get knowledge we can all rely on. But as knowledge is absorbed by our new digital medium, it's becoming clear that the fundamentals of knowledge are not properties of knowledge but of its old paper medium. Skulls don't scale. But the Net does. Now networked knowledge is taking on the properties of its new medium: never being settled, including disagreement within itself, and becoming not a set of stopping points but a web of temptations. Networked knowledge, for all its strengths, has its own set of problems. But, in knowledge's new nature there is perhaps a hint about why the Net has such surprising transformative power.

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Stigmergy

Stigmergy | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
This article is part of a series: ‘Governance and other systems of mass collaboration’. Stigmergy is a mechanism of indirect coordination between agents or actions. The principle is tha...
starwalker's insight:

Stigmergy is neither competitive nor traditionally collaborative.

With stigmergy, an initial idea is freely given, and the project is driven by the idea, not by a personality or group of personalities. No individual needs permission (competitive) or consensus (cooperative) to propose an idea or initiate a project. There is no need to discuss or vote on the idea, if an idea is exciting or necessary it will attract interest. The interest attracted will be from people actively involved in the system and willing to put effort into carrying the project further, not empty votes from people with little interest or involvement. Since the project is supported or rejected based on contributed effort, not empty votes, input from people with more commitment to the idea will have greater weight. Stigmergy also puts individuals in control over their own work.

 

Rather than the traditional corporate model of endless acquisition and expansion, stigmergy encourages splintering into different nodes. Because each individual is responsible only for their own work, and no one can direct a group of workers, expansion means more work for the individual, a self limiting prospect. As a system grows, the additional work requires either additional resources or splintering; as communication is easier and there is more autonomy in smaller groups, splintering is the more likely outcome of growth.


A new system of governance or collaboration that does not follow a competitive hierarchical model will need to employ stigmergy in most of its action based systems. It is neither reasonable nor desirable for individual thought and action to be subjugated to group consensus in matters which do not affect the group, and it is frankly impossible to accomplish complex tasks if every decision must be presented for approval; that is the biggest weakness of the hierarchical model. The incredible success of so many internet projects are the result of stigmergy, not cooperation, and it is stigmergy that will help us build quickly, efficiently and produce results far better than any of us can foresee at the outset.

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A Meta-layer for Restoring Democracy and Open Society: Part One, Conceptual Foundations

A Meta-layer for Restoring Democracy and Open Society: Part One, Conceptual Foundations | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
starwalker's insight:

the ability of CASs to successfully learn and develop new rules, or knowledge, is greater to the extent that their constituent agents are operating in problem-solving and distributed knowledge processing environments marked by relative “openness.” “Openness” must apply across various phases of the problem-solving process. It has at least two important dimensions. The first is internal transparency (availability and accessibility of information across CAS agents); the second is epistemic inclusiveness, equal opportunity for all autonomous CAS agents to participate and interact in the problem-solving and distributed knowledge processing of the system, so that it can be more effective. Both are always found in high-performance CASs. An example taken from outside the human domain helps illustrate a pattern of (uncontaminated) epistemic inclusiveness.

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Guide to the Systems Engineering Body of Knowledge (SEBoK) v. 1.0.1 - 1.0.1 Sebokcase

Guide to the Systems Engineering Body of Knowledge (SEBoK) v. 1.0.1 - 1.0.1 Sebokcase | open-ended processes | Scoop.it

On behalf of 70 authors, the editors welcome you to the Guide to the Systems Engineering Body of Knowledge (SEBoK) version 1.0.1. This version was released 30 November 2012, and contains minor corrections to version 1.0, which was released in September 2012.
The SEBoK provides a compendium of the key sources and references of systems engineering, organized and explained to assist a wide variety of users. It is a living document, accepting community input continuously, and regularly refreshed and updated.

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OR Books — Cypherpunks

OR Books — Cypherpunks | open-ended processes | Scoop.it

FREEDOM AND THE FUTURE OF THE INTERNET

 

JULIAN ASSANGE

 

With JACOB APPELBAUM, ANDY MÜLLER-MAGUHN and JÉRÉMIE ZIMMERMANN

 

"Cypherpunks is gripping, vital reading, explaining clearly the way in which corporate and government control of the internet poses a fundamental threat to our freedom and democracy".
—Oliver Stone

 

"Obligatory reading for everyone interested in the reality of our freedoms." —Slavoj Zizek

 

"The power of this book is that it breaks a silence. It marks an insurrection of subjugated knowledge that is, above all, a warning to all." —John Pilger

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Bio-Inspired Political Systems. Opening a Field

In this paper we highlight the scopes of engineering bio-inspired political systems, which are political systems based on the properties of life that self-organize the increasing complexity of human social systems. We describe bio-inspired political systems and conjecture about various ways to get to them, most notably, metaheuristics, modeling and simulation and complexified topologies. Bio-inspired political systems operate with nature-based dynamics, inspired on the knowledge that has been acquired about complexity from natural social systems and life. Bio-inspired political systems are presented as the best alternative for organizing human sociopolitical interactions as computation and microelectronics-based technology profoundly modify the ways in which humans decide. Therefore, weakening classical political systems. For instance, dwindling top-down power structures, modifying the notion of geographical spatiality and augmenting the political granularity. We also argue that, more than a new theoretical proposal, bio-inspired political systems are coming to be the political systems of the future.

 

Bio-Inspired Political Systems. Opening a Field

Nathalie Mezza-Garcia

http://arxiv.org/abs/1211.2787


Via Complexity Digest, Spaceweaver
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Articles and Papers - Morphic Resonance and Morphic Fields

Articles and Papers - Morphic Resonance and Morphic Fields | open-ended processes | Scoop.it

Rupert Sheldrake a controversial and interesting biologist author of a theory on the extended mind based upon morphic fields, in analogy to biological morphic fields hypotesis used in developmental biology.

 

"If we want to stick to the idea of natural laws, we could say that as nature itself evolves, the laws of nature also evolve, just as human laws evolve over time. But then how would natural laws be remembered or enforced? The law metaphor is embarrassingly anthropomorphic. Habits are less human-centred. Many kinds of organisms have habits, but only humans have laws. The habits of nature depend on non-local similarity reinforcement. Through morphic resonance, the patterns of activity in self-organizing systems are influenced by similar patterns in the past, giving each species and each kind of self-organizing system a collective memory.

I believe that the natural selection of habits will play an essential part in any integrated theory of evolution, including not just biological evolution, but also physical, chemical, cosmic, social, mental and cultural evolution (as discussed in THE PRESENCE OF THE PAST ).

Habits are subject to natural selection; and the more often they are repeated, the more probable they become, other things being equal. Animals inherit the successful habits of their species as instincts. We inherit bodily, emotional, mental and cultural habits, including the habits of our languages."

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Sugata Mitra: Build a School in the Cloud | Video on TED.com

Onstage at TED2013, Sugata Mitra makes his bold TED Prize wish: Help me design the School in the Cloud, a learning lab in India, where children can explore and learn from each other -- using resources and mentoring from the cloud.
starwalker's insight:

a brilliant thought in the future of education, Sugata Mitra won TED prize this month

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What Doesn’t Kill Us Makes Us Stronger

What Doesn’t Kill Us Makes Us Stronger | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
As systems grow increasingly complex, it becomes impossible to identify or test for every possible cause of failure, writes Guest Columnist Irving Wladawsky-Berger.

 

There is a continuing struggle between complexity and robustness in both evolution and human design. A kind of survival imperative, whether in biology or engineering, requires that simple, fragile systems become more robust. But the mechanisms to increase robustness will in turn make the system considerably more complex. Furthermore, that additional complexity brings its own unanticipated failure modes, which are corrected over time with additional robust mechanisms, which then further add to the complexity of the system, and so on. This balancing act between complexity and robustness is never done.

 

 The classic approaches to safety assumed that accidents are caused by component failures or by human error. Introducing fault tolerance techniques and planning for their failure will help prevent accidents, thus making components very reliable. Similarly rewarding safe human behavior and punishing unsafe behavior will eliminate or significantly reduce accidents.

These assumptions no longer apply, especially for complex, sociotechnical systems–that is, systems that combine powerful digital technologies with the people and organizations that use and support them. 

 

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Red State, Blue City: How the Urban-Rural Divide Is Splitting America

Red State, Blue City: How the Urban-Rural Divide Is Splitting America | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
Partisan lines that once fell along regional borders can increasingly be found at the county level. What does that mean for the future of the United States?
starwalker's insight:

The voting data suggest that people don't make cities liberal -- cities make people liberal.

The gap is so stark that some of America's bluest cities are located in its reddest states.

Electoral cartograms by University of Michigan physics professor Mark Newman show the power of Democratic counties based on population density. Spreading each vote out, his illustrations portray the hidden truth of the conventional electoral map, and why the much smaller number of dedicated blue counties is outmatching the more geographically numerous red counties.


After this year's election, roughly half of the 50 states allow the practice of one, more, or all of the following: same-sex marriage, marijuana use or assisted suicide.

Meanwhile, all of the states that voted against Obamacare also ban both same-sex marriage and marijuana use.

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Christien Meindertsma: How pig parts make the world turn

http://www.ted.com Christien Meindertsma, author of "Pig 05049" looks at the astonishing afterlife of the ordinary pig, parts of which make their way into at least 187 non-pork products, from bullets to artificial hearts....

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Maajid Nawaz: A global culture to fight extremism | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Why do transnational extremist organizations succeed where democratic movements have a harder time taking hold?
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Maajid Nawaz, a former Islamist extremist, and today a promoter of decomacracy in Pakistan, asks important, critical questions on global political processes and brings an insider view into the fight among extremism of all types and democratic activism and culture. Important.

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Introduction & Learning Objectives

Introduction & Learning Objectives | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
starwalker's insight:

Causal Inference

 

a brilliant glimpse into the growing non-linearity of cause-effect in complex and overly connected systems.

a module from Boston University, School of Public Health, on causal inference and webs of causation; Prof WW LaMorte.

 

"Since a determination that a relationship is causal is a judgment, there is often disagreement, particularly since causality often implies some degree of responsibility for the outcome, and this often has legal and financial consequences. Many would agree that incomplete evidence or a lack of agreement about causality, should not always prevent appropriate actions to protect the public's health. Nevertheless, the question of whether a relationship is causal sometimes has important consequences for a vast number of people, as we will see in this module..


Distinguish between association and a causal relationship.Describe and apply Hill's criteria and for a judgment of causality.Describe the sufficient-component cause model.Discuss in general the differences in the weight of evidence needed for determining causality versus taking public health action."

 

 


 

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Steven Poole – On human enhancement

Steven Poole – On human enhancement | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
Prosthetics, doping, computer implants: we take every upgrade we can get. But what is waiting for us at the finish line?
starwalker's insight:

Today, improvements in cognitive pharmaceuticals, genetic engineering and high-tech prostheses inspire some to dream of a future of accelerating species enhancement, reaching a point where we will have become — what? Übermenschen? Cyborgs? Post-humans? Or just better versions of ourselves?

In Emily Sargent’s artfully curated exhibition, Superhuman, at the Wellcome Trust in London this summer, sci-fi visions of future improvements were presented side-by-side with artifacts from the history of human enhancement.4

 

‘I’m mystified by the resistance that human enhancement faces,’ Harris writes in the Superhuman exhibition catalogue. ‘I think many people have a horror of playing God, but if they reflected on how bad a job God was doing most of the time, they would lose that horror.’

 

But the most revealingly naive prediction was this, scheduled to come true a mere 18 years from now: ‘The ability to control the genetics of humans, animals, and agricultural plants will greatly benefit human welfare; widespread consensus about ethical, legal, and moral issues will be built in the process.’

This is truly a marvellous apogee of technocratic utopianism. Global agreement on ‘ethical, legal, and moral’ issues has been out of reach for all of recorded human civilisation, at least through the traditional means of reasoning and persuasion. Just because we might become as gods with regard to the molecular building blocks of life doesn’t mean we won’t continue to bicker and squabble. After all, that’s just what communities of gods spend most of their time doing in polytheistic mythologies. Or perhaps we are meant to read this future consensus as one propagated by morally improving chemistry.

 

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invisible_airs_documentary | YoHa

invisible_airs_documentary | YoHa | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
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The critical influence of Data in our life and the distance of it from our language and gesture understandable world. 

Invisible Airs is an art project by YoHa assisted by Stephen Fortune. The work has been examining the possible relations between data (open data) and people through building relational machines powered by data and letting people interact with it. Invisible Airs is an investigation of Power, Governance and Data informed by the expenditure database of Bristol City Council.


"After attempting to read 20,000 comma separated lines of apparently open-data, we understood that power revealed itself through boredom. We decided that the best way to reveal the relations contained within its fields and the people affected by it would be to construct five contraptions..."

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Trust in Organisations

Trust in Organisations | open-ended processes | Scoop.it

 

Reference to existing Literature on Trust in organization and sociology. Maybe a completely different perspective should be contemplated....?

 

A search of Google Scholar indicates that books and journal papers to do with trust, organisations and leadership numbered a few hundred per annum during the 1960s, jumping to the low thousands during the 1970s, and approaching 10,000 per annum in the 1990s. During the early years of this century the number of publications has numbered around an average of 40,000 per year.

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Human Evolution Enters an Exciting New Phase | Wired Science | Wired.com

Human Evolution Enters an Exciting New Phase | Wired Science | Wired.com | open-ended processes | Scoop.it
If you could escape the human time scale for a moment, and regard evolution from the perspective of deep time, in which the last 10,000 years are a short chapter in a long story, you'd say: Things are pretty wild right now.

 

In the most massive study of genetic variation yet, researchers estimated the age of more than one million variants, or changes to our DNA code, found across human populations. The vast majority proved to be quite young. The chronologies tell a story of evolutionary dynamics in recent human history, a period characterized by both narrow reproductive bottlenecks and sudden, enormous population growth.

 

The evolutionary dynamics of these features resulted in a flood of new genetic variation, accumulating so fast that natural selection hasn’t caught up yet. As a species, we are freshly bursting with the raw material of evolution.

 

“We’ve gone from several hundred million people to seven billion in a blink of evolutionary time,” said Akey. “That’s had a profound effect on structuring the variation present in our species.”

 

The researchers sequenced in exhaustive detail protein-coding genes from 6,515 people, compiling a list of every DNA variation they found — 1,146,401 in all, of which 73 percent were rare.

 

Akey’s group found that rare variations tended to be relatively new, with some 73 percent of all genetic variation arising in just the last 5,000 years. Of variations that seem likely to cause harm, a full 91 percent emerged in this time.

 

“Humans today carry a much larger load of deleterious variants than our species carried just prior to its massive expansion just a couple hundred generations ago,”

 

The inverse is also true.
Indeed, the genetic seeds of exceptional traits, such as endurance or strength or innate intelligence, may now be circulating in humanity. “The genetic potential of our population is vastly different than what it was 10,000 years ago,” Akey said.

 

via Wildcat

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Global Risks

Global Risks | open-ended processes | Scoop.it

Economic imbalances and social inequality risk reversing the gains of globalization, warns the World Economic Forum in its report Global Risks 2012. These are the findings of a survey of 469 experts and industry leaders who worry that the world’s institutions are ill-equipped to cope with today’s interconnected, rapidly evolving risks. The findings of the survey fed into an analysis of three major risk cases: Seeds of Dystopia; Unsafe Safeguards and the Dark Side of Connectivity. The report also analyses the top 10 risks in five categories - economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal and technological.

 

The World Economic Forum (WEF) is a Geneva-based non-profit organization best known for its Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland, the Annual Meeting of New Champions in China (Summer Davos) and the Summit on the Global Agenda in Dubai.

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Working in the Social World: Complex Adaptive Systems

Keynote presentation on managing complex social systems and process, very interesting description of communities development

 

from Defrag 2012 (RT @rhappe: A big thank you to @defrag for a great #defragcon - here are my slides on managing complex adaptive systems - http://t.co/eJAgkeKT...)...


Via A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
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