Open Educational Resources in Higher Education
4.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Open Educational Resources in Higher Education
sharing, collaboration and repurposing content are the hallmarks of modern education
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Peter Mellow from Learning and Teaching in an Online Environment
Scoop.it!

Is the ‘closed’ mindset of the Open Educational Resources community its own worst enemy?

Is the ‘closed’ mindset of the Open Educational Resources community its own worst enemy? | Open Educational Resources in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The promise was of a future where Open Educational Resources would sweep the globe and those pesky publishers would be washed away by a tsunami of high quality, free stuff. It happened to a degree with Wikipedia, Khan, YouTube, MOOCs and Duolingo but almost in spite of the OER movement. In fact, there seems to have been a bifurcation in OER between lots of publically funded projects, that tended to atrophy even die, and a successful crop of global successes. I’d argue that this was due to several strains of scepticism, institutional attitudes and a lack of awareness around marketing and sustainability in the educational community. The successes have been those that weren't held back by these barriers.

Via ColinHickie
Peter Mellow's insight:
Share your insight
more...
ColinHickie's curator insight, March 9, 2016 6:04 PM
Share your insight
Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, March 10, 2016 3:01 AM
Share your insight
Ines Bieler's curator insight, March 10, 2016 10:41 AM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Kim Flintoff from Digital Learning - beyond eLearning and Blended Learning in Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Can anyone catch Khan Academy? The fate of the U in the YouTube era | KurzweilAI

Can anyone catch Khan Academy? The fate of the U in the YouTube era | KurzweilAI | Open Educational Resources in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Salman Khan (credit: Khan Academy)

 

Traditional American universities are suddenly running scared of YouTube, Xconomy reports, along with Vimeo, 5min, iTunes U, TED and the Internet Archive.

Without YouTube, Sal Khan and Khan Academy could never have reached his 4 million unique viewers a month with their 3,200 videos, viewed 170 million times.


Via Dennis T OConnor, Jason Dargent, Kim Flintoff
more...
No comment yet.