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Following the developments on MOOCs and online learning and their impact on higher education
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Recent reports and papers on MOOCs and Online education | ICDE

Recent reports and papers on MOOCs and Online education | ICDE | Open and online learning | Scoop.it

This overview of nine key documents published over the past year is provided to support the ongoing debate on MOOCs, Open Educational Resources and online education, and to support the change processes in this time of openness. Dates of publication and extent are noted.

 


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, October 15, 2013 7:20 AM

The ICDE or International Council on Distance Education has made room on its website for what they believe are influential papers and reports on MOOCs. No surprises really, but predominantly a handy collection for who wants to acquaint him or herself with MOOCs. @pbsloep

uTOP Inria's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:24 AM

(ICDE - 11/10/2013).

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MOOC Discussion Forums: barrier to engagement? -

MOOC Discussion Forums: barrier to engagement? - | Open and online learning | Scoop.it
Robert McGuire wrote an article for Campus Technology, Building a Sense of Community in MOOCs, that touches on an important topic – is the centralized discussion forum a barrier to student engagement?

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MOOC, a European view - Yves Epelboin

MOOC, a European view - Yves Epelboin | Open and online learning | Scoop.it

"Back from the United States, after a visit to the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University in Philadelphia, and having attended the 2012 Educause conference in Denver, this memo summerizes my understanding of MOOC, an initiative launched by several well known American universities. My main purpose was to understand what is behind this enthusiasm and how it can be translated to European universities.

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The new concept, here, is the need to process large masses of students, requiring automatic control and monitoring with minimal human intervention. In other words “flipped learning” appears as a revolution in pedagogy, not because it is is more efficient, but because it is needed to handle large numbers of students. 

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European universities must enter the movement. Otherwise all the space will be filled by initiatives coming from other places. The motivation to establish a MOOC, in Europe, can not be the same as in the United States, because the socio-economic context, the cost of education, the role of the state to define the university strategy, are completely different."


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, January 3, 2013 6:47 AM

After sketching the socio-economic context in which MOOCs arose in the USA, Yves Epelboin, Director IT for Teaching and Learning at UPMC-Sorbonne Universités, attempts to draw a lesson for the European situation. Interestingly, although the socio-economics of European universities are quite different than those of US universities, he still feels that 'European universities must enter the movement', otherwise the Americans will have taken over our eduction. This fear is heart more widely, and it is of course not entirely unthinkable something like this could happen. After all, the entertainment industry has gone the American way and so have the big social media. However, before jumping onto the MOOC bandwagon, it would be useful to investigate a little better what the effect is of the differences in socio-economical situation between the USA and Europe, indeed, among European countries. Does it affect the chances of success of MOOCs, does it affect the way MOOCs should be put together? I believe the answer to both is 'yes'. Also, perhaps the European Association of Distance Teaching Universities (www.EADTU.eu) has something useful to add to this discussion. After all, they represent some 20 years of experience with distance teaching collaboration in Europe. Finally, perhaps in Europe we should focus our attention on sharing Open Educational Resources more widely? One thing seems to be important, though. Countries in Europe in which tuition hikes are steep are probable more susceptible to MOOCing their eduction than others. We should carefully monitor therefore what goes on in the UK. (@pbsloep)

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FutureLearn Launches First Batch Of 20 Free Courses As It Chases Coursera, Et Al. | TechCrunch

FutureLearn Launches First Batch Of 20 Free Courses As It Chases Coursera, Et Al. | TechCrunch | Open and online learning | Scoop.it
FutureLearn, a U.K.-led MOOCs alliance, has launched its first set of free courses, nine months after announcing its intention to jump into the Massively Open Online Courses space. FutureLearn has grown in size and scope during that pre-launch phase.

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Top Free Classes's curator insight, September 19, 2013 2:11 AM

Many interesting courses. But  3 hours/week workload doesn't seem enough for the college-like course.

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HarvardX, edX, and online teaching, learning expand | John Harvard - Harvard Magazine

"I am today a convert,” Bowen said. “I have come to believe that 'now is the time’”—that advances in technology “have combined with changing mindsets to suggest that online learning, in many of its manifestations, can lead to good learning outcomes at lower cost.” The evolution is on—in technology, teaching, and mindsets.

 

(William G. Bowen is president emeritus of Princeton and of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, a distinguished analyst of higher education, in his Tanner Lectures at Stanford, October 2012)


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 15, 2013 4:30 AM

Whether you agree with William Bowen or not, you should read the article if you want to be kept abreast of Harvard's current state of mind with respect to MOOCs. The article discusses in particular edX, which it describes as a not-for-profit enterprise. According to John Harvard, edX is going to expand its course offerings into the Arts and Humanities (Chinese history, classical Greek literature, ...), it is going to experiments with an interestingly different kind of instructional design (featuring "labs"), it is has appointed an assistant professor for research of education with MOOCs. For more on the research aspect, see my blog written after a talk by Katie Vale on edX (http://tiny.cc/wajjsw).Tony Bates has written a more extensive comment, which you might want to consult (http://tiny.cc/n1ijsw). (@pbsloep)