Open Access News from the RSP team
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Open Washing and Open Access Publishing

"Open Access stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse.1

As discussed earlier in this blog it is obvious that non-commercial and non-derivatives licenses do not comply with the requirements of the Budapest Open Access Initiative, the RCUK Open Access policy and the Berlin Declaration. All these licences have to be considered as totally incompatible with “Open Access” publishing.

If you look at the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and the new Directory of Open Access Monographs (DOAB), you will find most of the publications listed are using non-commercial and non-derivatives licenses which are not open in Terms of the Definition of “Open”. Even if the metadata in DOAJ and DOAB is licensed under an open license (CC-BY-SA), they do not list true “Open Access” publications as they promise. These two open access directories are just two of many examples of an ongoing threat of the idea of unrestricted access and reuse of academic publications."

 

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Open access mandate narrowed in formal proposals

Open access mandate narrowed in formal proposals | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Initial proposals published in February envisaged requiring a certain proportion of submitted monographs to be open access. However, among the 260 respondents to an informal consultation on the plans there was “widespread concern about the extent to which open access is reasonably achievable” for monographs.

For that reason, monographs will now be exempt from the mandate. However, the funding councils’ formal proposals, published for consultation on July 24, make clear the exemption will only be temporary “in view of our expectation that open access publication for monographs and books is likely to be achievable in the long term”.

The “overwhelming majority” of respondents to the informal consultation agreed that it is not currently feasible to require data sets to be open access. Hence, the first open access REF mandate will apply only to journal articles and conference proceedings whose authors include UK-based academics."

 

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Does mandatory policy help Open Access? | Open Science

Does mandatory policy help Open Access? | Open Science | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"How to disseminate Open Access? How to convince scholars, universities and research institutions that OA may help in the development of science? These questions are a never-ending topic of discussion in the scientific community. There are also many answers to these questions, and one of them is a mandatory OA policy for scientists, established by a government or university. However, the question is: does it really work?

The mandatory policy for OA has its supporters and opponents and this division can be observed pretty well during the discussions on the new regulations in the UK. The opponents may say that new rules favor one type of OA and marginalize the other (Gold vs. Green), that the objectivity and freedom of scientific research may be compromised, that freedom of choice is being limited, or that those who control funding will have undue influence on what is being published and where.

Many of these arguments may, or indeed touch upon the real threats that may arise with the introduction of top-down rules for OA. Unfortunately, there is always a shortage of funds for science, research and publishing. Each institution introducing rules concerning OA, whether it is a university or government, will take into account the financial factor and try to choose the best compromise. Of course, you can always argue whether the solution actually supports OA and scientists or not."

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Promoting Open Access and Review (Publishing Reflection) | Readings 804

"To summarize Nawrotzki and Dougherty, the arrival of the internet has expanded historical readership, allowed more people to contribute to scholarship, and altered the process of doing history – yet the process of evaluating and publishing history has not changed significantly. There are three general areas in which progress can be made though it has been made slowly so far: 1. Open Access – making more scholarship available to a wider audience conveniently and at a lower cost. 2. Open Review – taking advantage of the web’s collaborative capabilities to improve the peer review. And 3. Improved publishing formats – creating scholarly content which exploits the capabilities of digital technology, rather than reproducing traditional formats electronically."

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Springer Renews its Commitment to Open Access

"Springer Science+Business Mediaannounced that the influence of its open access (OA) journals has increased over the past year.

In Thomson Reuters’ new edition of Journal Citation Reports for 2012, which calculates a journal’s impact factor in the industry based on its articles’ cited references, 46 Springer journals received an impact factor for the first time, meaning that their citation data improved over the year. Springer now has 1,539 journals with impact factors from Thomson Reuters, out of its full publishing program of 2,200 titles last year.

Springer received more good news from the report: 86% of its journal titles have increased citations, and 55% increased their impact factor numbers.

Springer now has 163 OA journals with an impact factor, which is 41% of its entire OA output.

“Not only did our overall numbers grow, but nearly one half of those with new impact factors were open access. This reaffirms the importance of peer-reviewed publications supported by different models,” says Peter Hendriks, president of scientific, technical, and medical publishing at Springer"

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Busting the top five myths about open access publishing

"Rather than lock up knowledge in costly journals, increasingly universities and governments are recognising that publicly funded research should be open to all.

This past year has seen new open access policies in the United Kingdom, the United States and from the European Commission. In Australia too, the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC) now both have open access policies.

Despite this activity, there remains a large amount of confusion about open access, with many misunderstandings persisting in the academic community and in universities"

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Why Robin Osborne makes no sense

Why Robin Osborne makes no sense | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Robin Osborne, professor of ancient history at King’s College, Cambridge, had an article in the Guardian yesterday entitled “Why open access makes no sense“. It was described by Peter Coles as “a spectacularly insular and arrogant argument”, by Peter Webster as an “Amazingly wrong-headed piece” and  by Glyn Moody as “easily the most arrogant & dim-witted article I’ve ever read on OA”.

Here’s my response (posted as a comment on the original article):

At a time when the world as a whole is waking up to the open-access imperative, it breaks my heart to read this fusty, elitist, reactionary piece, in which Professor Osborne ends up arguing strongly for his own irrelevance. What a tragic lack of vision, and of ambition."

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Why open access makes no sense

Why open access makes no sense | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The fundamental argument for providing open access to academic research is that research that is funded by the tax-payer should be available to the tax-payer. Those who have paid for the research, it is urged, should not have to pay a second time for access to the publication of that research. Proponents of what has come to be called 'open access' claim that this is simply obvious, but in fact this argument mistakes the fundamental nature of academic research, it mistakes nature and process of academic publication, and it mistakes what is involved in providing access to academic research. I shall limit my claims here to research in the Humanities, but very similar arguments apply to research in the sciences also."

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Six paths to a global Open Access Repository | Tim McCormick

Six paths to a global Open Access Repository | Tim McCormick | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The Web was created for scientific communication, but 20 years after its launch, only a small percentage of scientific/scholarly publications are freely Web-accessible/reusable. Only about 12% of publications are self-archived compared to an estimated 81% that could be[1]. Open Access publishing is growing but it covers only some articles, and comparatively little older, humanities, or book/other content. Repositories, run by parties other than publishers, containing possibly preprint or alternate forms of content, may offer much of the low-hanging fruit in expanding access to research literature"

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Newly published essays debate future of open acces

"The British Academy today publishes a series of 8 newly commissioned articles reflecting on the challenges and opportunities for humanities and social sciences open access publishing practices. 

Debating Open Access - edited by British Academy Vice-Presidents Professor Nigel Vincent and Professor Chris Wickham - demonstrates that there is still much work to be done in ensuring that government policies to mandate open access publication do not damage the quality and reputation of UK academic research."

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Join Us for a Complimentary Open Access Webinar

"Complimentary Webinar. A discussion about the latest developments in Open Access and scholarly publishing. In 2013, mandates for Open Access are driving dramatic changes in business models and workflow practices. Publishers are struggling with the details. And if OA isn’t complicated for you yet…it will be"

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Open access inaction

Open access inaction | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

Jack Stilgoe: From time to time, it's important to pause the bureaucratic debate about open access and recognise how stupid scientific publishing is. Like many academics, I am currently trying to work out what I should think and do about open access. I share with many scientists strong personal commitments to the idea of openness. I am in this game because I think research is valuable, and I work at a University because I like the idea that research that should be in the public interest should mostly be publicly funded. Like many other academics, I find it utterly daft that such research is paywalled. Unlike some academics, I do not presume that the people who are able to get past these paywalls (other academics at rich universities) are the only relevant readers."

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HEFCE Open Access Mandate Not Narrower: Better Focused - Open Access Archivangelism

HEFCE Open Access Mandate Not Narrower: Better Focused - Open Access Archivangelism | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"1. Model. The HEFCE proposal to mandate immediate (not retrospective) deposit of journal articles in the author's institutional repository in order to make them eligible for evaluation in the next Research Excellence Framework (REF) is wise and timely, and, if adopted, will serve as a model for the rest of the world. It will also complement the Green (self-archiving) component of the RCUK Open Access (OA) mandate, providing it with an all-important mechanism for monitoring and ensuring compliance.

2. Monographs. Exempting monographs for now was a good decision. The HEFCE mandate, like the RCUK mandate, applies only to peer-reviewed journal articles. These are all author giveaways, written solely for research impact, not royalty income. This is not true of all monographs. (But a simple compromise is possible: recommend -- but don't require -- monograph deposit too, but with access set as Closed Access rather than Open Access, with no limit on the length of the OA embargo. Author choice.)"

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Open and Shut?: Eloy Rodrigues on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Eloy Rodrigues on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the sixth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Eloy Rodrigues, Portuguese librarian and Director of the University of Minho’s Documentation Services. In any movement there are those who talk about what needs to be done and there are those who get on and do it. Judging by the limited number of posts that Eloy Rodrigues has made to the primary OA mailing list (GOAL) he does not belong to the former group. However, Google offers ample evidence that he regularly gives business-like presentations and workshops on OA"

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SPARCing debate on Open Access

SPARCing debate on Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"As part of our field work in Washington DC last month I met with Heather Joseph who is Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), a membership organization of academic and research libraries. Their mission is to make libraries and the information they hold more equitable and more open, and they count more than 800 institutions among their membership.

Heather gave a great overview of where SPARC have been in the past and where they see themselves in the future.  She began by noting that there remain barriers to providing high quality information on campus, and the subscription model impedes possibilities for innovation."

 

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OA monographs pose challenges for researchers and librarians - Research Information

"Last week’s Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference attracted several hundred delegates and a lively discussion, both at the event and online. Caren Milloy reports

For researchers and funders dismayed at the decline in monograph sales and the dwindling impact that this seems to suggest, open access (OA) publishing offers an exciting opportunity to make research available more widely. But, as delegates heard at early July’s Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference at the British Library, OA brings with it the need for fundamental new approaches from researchers, libraries and publishers."

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Changing the game in the search for open access

"For the past few months, like chickens on eggs we have been sitting on what we think is a game changing idea. We’ve been sitting on it because despite trying as two student activists, we just haven’t found the help we need to make it a reality. So to preface what you’re about to read – we need your help.

It almost goes without saying that the current model of scientific publishing needs a rethink. Every day, academics, students and the public are denied access to the vital research they both need and paid for. Open Access is a solution to this problem; Open Access is the practice of providing unrestricted access via the Internet to peer-reviewed scholarly journal articles. If Open Access is new to you, we’d recommend you watch this video on Open Access before continuing on. You only need look to PLOS’ award program, or the story of Jack Andraka, the 16 year old who used Open Access papers to invent a diagnostic test for pancreatic cancer to understand the positive impact of open access to research."

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Open Access and the looming crisis in science

"Foundation essay: This article on the open access and science by Björn Brembs is part of a series marking the launch of The Conversation in the UK. Our foundation essays are longer than our usual comment and analysis articles and take a wider look at key issues affecting society.

There is a looming crisis in science, and we must act now to prevent it.

Currently, the number of scientific papers retracted from a large database of thousands of biomedical journals is a mere 0.05%, a low rate. But recently this rate has been rising. That rise is so quick that, if the trend were to continue, as many scientific publications will have to be retracted as are being published by about 2045."

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Evaluating the Open Access software toolchain

Evaluating the Open Access software toolchain | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"I received an interesting email this week from Nate Wright, who posed the following questions: "I’m a web developer interested in contributing to a low-cost, open-source solution for online academic publishing. Prompted by a conversation with a former lecturer of mine, I’ve spent some time investigating the various open-source or low-cost options for digital journal publication (OJS, Scholastica, Annotum, Faculty, and the collection of tools being developed by the team at eLife).

It looks like OJS is the only open-source platform out there which can provide end-to-end capabilities for running a journal. In my own experience, though, I’ve grown wary of niche CMS’s, which lack a large body of tools and community support to help inexperienced site admins easily customise and extend their website. Even fairly large and well-maintained CMS’s, like Silverstripe, really suffer from the small size of their community developing plugins and themes. OJS seems pretty tightly bound to traditional publishing cycles as well, which will limit its utility as academic publishing transitions to new models. Speaking purely from the perspective of a mainstream web developer, if I was advising someone setting up a journal now, I would tell them they were taking a risk by committing to OJS. It’s not clear how a successful journal website could mature on the platform over time and whether or not data would be portable if (when) a better solution arises in the future."

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Open Access at Oxford » Open Access scenario 2: Going Green

Open Access at Oxford » Open Access scenario 2: Going Green | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the 2nd in the series of scenarios. We meet an MRC-funded Oxford University Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Professor. Professor Smith has published two papers since 1 April 2013, when the RCUK policy on Open Access came into effect. In the example provided below Professor Smith was able to publish her paper Open Access via the ‘green’ route. 

Professor Smith, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, supports the idea that research funded by taxpayers’ money should be made available open access. However, the access status of a particular journal is not her main criterion in deciding where to publish. When publishing she always asks members of her team: “Who do you want to read your paper?”

- “It is all about visibility, impact within communities and fit to the subject”, she says."

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Guide to Creative Commons » OAPEN-UK

Guide to Creative Commons » OAPEN-UK | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"An output of the OAPEN-UK project, this guide explores concerns expressed in public evidence given by researchers, learned societies and publishers to inquiries in the House of Commons and the House of Lords, and also concerns expressed by researchers working with the OAPEN-UK project. We have also identified a number of common questions and have drafted answers, which have been checked by experts including Creative Commons. The guide has been edited by active researchers, to make sure that it is relevant and useful to academics faced with making decisions about publishing.

This guide is made available in open access using a CC BY licence. Readers can view the guide online (see below) or downlaod a PDF copy. Print copies are also available – please contact Caren Milloy to order."

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Conference | Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association

"Registration: Visit our registration page to book your place at COASP 2013.  Earlybird discounts are available until June 30th and further reductions are available for OASPA and OAPEN members.

Hotels: We have arranged with the conference hotel to have a number of discounted rooms for our guests. Details of how to book these discounted rooms, as well as information about other nearby hotels, can be found on our accommodation page."

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Picture emerges over ‘gold’ open-access allocations

Picture emerges over ‘gold’ open-access allocations | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The first signs are emerging of how UK universities are earmarking the £100 million allocated by Research Councils UK to pay for open-access publishing.

Introduced in April, the block grant pays the article fees required by journals to make papers freely available instantly under the “gold” open-access model. The sum comes on top of an initial £10 million outlay awarded to 30 universities in 2012.

At a session of the Association of Research Managers and Administrators annual conference, held in Nottingham on 11 and 12 June, eight delegates indicated that their institutions had decided on the mechanisms to apportion the cash"

 

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