Open Access News from the RSP team
4.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Open Access News from the RSP team
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

HEFCE, the State of Open Access in the UK and Post-2014 REF

HEFCE, the State of Open Access in the UK and Post-2014 REF | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Having returned from a glorious week away in Crotia and Bosnia (for Pynchon fans: it was “very nice, very nice, very nice indeed”), I have returned to an inbox that features the current state of play with HEFCE’s thinking on open access mandates for a post-2014 REF. In order to ensure that I’ve got it straight in my own head, I thought I’d write a summary post for quick reference. I’m using the PDF version as my reference. This refers to the 16th July 2013 document."

more...
Rachel H's curator insight, August 21, 2013 9:48 AM

Very helpful summary from @martin_eve of the current HEFCE consultation doc on OA for post-2014 REF

 

Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open Washing and Open Access Publishing

"Open Access stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse.1

As discussed earlier in this blog it is obvious that non-commercial and non-derivatives licenses do not comply with the requirements of the Budapest Open Access Initiative, the RCUK Open Access policy and the Berlin Declaration. All these licences have to be considered as totally incompatible with “Open Access” publishing.

If you look at the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and the new Directory of Open Access Monographs (DOAB), you will find most of the publications listed are using non-commercial and non-derivatives licenses which are not open in Terms of the Definition of “Open”. Even if the metadata in DOAJ and DOAB is licensed under an open license (CC-BY-SA), they do not list true “Open Access” publications as they promise. These two open access directories are just two of many examples of an ongoing threat of the idea of unrestricted access and reuse of academic publications."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

HEFCE Open Access Mandate Not Narrower: Better Focused - Open Access Archivangelism

HEFCE Open Access Mandate Not Narrower: Better Focused - Open Access Archivangelism | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"1. Model. The HEFCE proposal to mandate immediate (not retrospective) deposit of journal articles in the author's institutional repository in order to make them eligible for evaluation in the next Research Excellence Framework (REF) is wise and timely, and, if adopted, will serve as a model for the rest of the world. It will also complement the Green (self-archiving) component of the RCUK Open Access (OA) mandate, providing it with an all-important mechanism for monitoring and ensuring compliance.

2. Monographs. Exempting monographs for now was a good decision. The HEFCE mandate, like the RCUK mandate, applies only to peer-reviewed journal articles. These are all author giveaways, written solely for research impact, not royalty income. This is not true of all monographs. (But a simple compromise is possible: recommend -- but don't require -- monograph deposit too, but with access set as Closed Access rather than Open Access, with no limit on the length of the OA embargo. Author choice.)"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Harnad Response to HEFCE REF OA Policy Consultation - Open Access Archivangelism

Harnad Response to HEFCE REF OA Policy Consultation - Open Access Archivangelism | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Question 1: Do you agree that the criteria for open access are appropriate (subject to clarification on whether accessibility should follow immediately on acceptance or on publication)?

YES

1.1 The HEFCE REF OA Policy should apply to the refereed, accepted version of peer-reviewed research articles or refereed conference articles.

1.2 It should be deposited in the author’s HEI repository, immediately upon acceptance for publication.

1.3 Access to the deposit should be immediately Open Access where possible, or, where deemed necessary, it can be made Closed Access if the publisher requires an OA embargo.

1.4 The crucial thing is that the deposit should be made at time of acceptance, time-stamped as such, with a copy of the acceptance letter to serve as the date marker.

The proposal is excellent. And if adopted and effectively implemented, it will serve as a model for OA policies worldwide.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Potential CHORUS catastrophe for OA: How to fend it off - Open Access Archivangelism

Potential CHORUS catastrophe for OA: How to fend it off - Open Access Archivangelism | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Richard Poynder has elicited a splendid summary of OA by the person who has done more to bring about OA than anyone else on the planet: Peter Suber

Here are a few supplements that I know Peter will agree with:

1. Potential CHORUS Catastrophe for OA: Peter's summary of OA setbacks mentions only Finch. Finch was indeed a fiasco, with the publishing lobby convincing the UK to mandate, pay for, and prefer Gold OA (including hybrid Gold OA), and to downgrade and ignore Green OA.

Peter notes the damage that the publisher lobby has successully inflicted on worldwide (but especially UK) OA progress with the Finch/RCUK policy, but I'm sure he will agree that if the Trojan Horse of CHORUS were to be accepted by the US federal government and its funding agencies, the damage would be even greater and longer lasting:"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

On Trying to Hold Green OA and Fair-Gold OA Hostage to Subscriptions and Fools-Gold - Open Access Archivangelism

On Trying to Hold Green OA and Fair-Gold OA Hostage to Subscriptions and Fools-Gold - Open Access Archivangelism | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The cynical, self-serving spin of Springer's replies to Richard Poynder is breathtaking: Is it a sign of Springer's new ownership?

Despite the double-talk, applying a 12-month embargo where the policy has been to endorse unembargoed immediate-Green for 10 years could hardly be described (or justified) as "simplifying" things for the author, or anyone. It would be a pure and simple bid to maintain and maximize revenue streams from both subscriptions and Gold OA. (Note that I say "would" because in fact Springer is still Green and hence still on the Side of the Angels: read on.)

Green OA means free, immediate, permanent online access; hence a 12-month embargo hardly makes Green OA sustainable, as Springer suggests! It's not OA at all.

As stated previously, the distinction between an author's institutional repository and an author's "personal website" (which is of course likewise institutional) is a distinction between different sectors of an institutional disk. The rest is a matter of tagging."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open access: brought to book at last?

Open access: brought to book at last? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"A library-focused effort aims to take monographs off the analogue shelf. 

It would be easy to think of monographs as the scholarly output that the open-access movement forgot.

Mandates for free online access are popping up all around the world, but most relate exclusively to journal articles. A good example is Research Councils UK’s new open-access policy, launched in April and inspired by the Finch report published last year. That report dismissed monographs as too difficult a nut to crack in the absence of “further experimentation”.

The UK funding councils were slightly bolder. Their preliminary consultation on introducing an open-access mandate for the next research excellence framework, expected in 2020, included a question about whether a percentage of submitted monographs should be required to be open access."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open Access at Oxford » Open Access scenario 3: RCUK & CC BY – a ‘journey’ towards compliance

"In the 3rd in the series of Open Access scenarios we meet an EPSRC-funded Oxford University Professor working in the Department of Physics. The example demonstrates the decisions taken when the journal of choice did not offer the re-use license mandated by RCUK for compliance with their policy.

Professor Smith’s latest research project is funded by EPSRC. Since 1 April he has published one paper from the project, which he made available Open Access via the Green route i.e. deposited the accepted manuscript both in the subject repository, arXiv, and the University’s own repository, ORA.  This is what Professor Smith has been used to doing within his discipline."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Changing the game in the search for open access

"For the past few months, like chickens on eggs we have been sitting on what we think is a game changing idea. We’ve been sitting on it because despite trying as two student activists, we just haven’t found the help we need to make it a reality. So to preface what you’re about to read – we need your help.

It almost goes without saying that the current model of scientific publishing needs a rethink. Every day, academics, students and the public are denied access to the vital research they both need and paid for. Open Access is a solution to this problem; Open Access is the practice of providing unrestricted access via the Internet to peer-reviewed scholarly journal articles. If Open Access is new to you, we’d recommend you watch this video on Open Access before continuing on. You only need look to PLOS’ award program, or the story of Jack Andraka, the 16 year old who used Open Access papers to invent a diagnostic test for pancreatic cancer to understand the positive impact of open access to research."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Chris Wickham considers open access in the UK and international environment

Chris Wickham considers open access in the UK and international environment | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"In his chapter for Debating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy, Chris Wickham considers the view from Humanities and Social Science both from the UK and international environment. Since HSS disciplines receive only a small percentage of RCUK funds, HEFCE’s policy on the admissibility of work for future REFs will be the most important determining factor. Other countries do not have RAE/REF equivalents to drive them down the Gold route; hence they are more likely to stay with Green and with longer embargo periods. Some leading international journals, particularly in the Humanities, have set their face against Gold OA and the introduction of APCs. UK scholars in HSS thus face a dilemma. If they publish in noncompliant international journals their work risks being ineligible for future REFs; if they don’t publish in these venues they risk falling off the international pace. A particularly intense variant of this dilemma threatens those whose professional community does not operate in English. Future REF criteria will need to reflect these discipline-specific circumstances."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Debating Open Access

Debating Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Twelve months after the publication of the Finch Report, during which the new RCUK policy on open access has been published, dissected, debated (including by committees in both Houses of Parliament), revised and implemented, it seems an apposite moment to step back and take stock.

 

A collection of essays published today by the British Academy under the title Debating Open Access presents one attempt to do just that. Given that the essays are published under the imprimatur of the British Academy there is an emphasis on the perspective from the humanities and social sciences — I am the only natural scientist among the eight contributors. This is healthy in my view, since the open access debate often appears to be dominated by scientific interests. That domination may simply be due to the fact that money talks — the natural sciences take the lion’s share of funding from the UK Research Councils — but, as Rita Gardner points out in her essay, around half of all UK academics are from the humanities and social sciences."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Newly published essays debate future of open acces

"The British Academy today publishes a series of 8 newly commissioned articles reflecting on the challenges and opportunities for humanities and social sciences open access publishing practices. 

Debating Open Access - edited by British Academy Vice-Presidents Professor Nigel Vincent and Professor Chris Wickham - demonstrates that there is still much work to be done in ensuring that government policies to mandate open access publication do not damage the quality and reputation of UK academic research."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Getting Somewhere: HEFCE Proposals on Open Access for a Post-2014 Research Excellence Framework

Getting Somewhere: HEFCE Proposals on Open Access for a Post-2014 Research Excellence Framework | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This week, the UK’s Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) published their formal proposals for including an open access requirement in any post-2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). Responses to this will be accepted until 30th October 2013. These proposals follow a pre-consultation letter and set of responses which were submitted earlier in the year (link to University of Cambridge response).

Following up our concerns about the policy raised over the last few months (here and here, further posts here) the present iteration represents a decent outcome on some of the details, not least because it defers quite a few of them. That these issues have been deferred does not mean that they do not matter; rather it means that the battles on them will be fought elsewhere – with universities, with journal boards, with learned societies, with publishers and their lawyers and so on. Moreover, there is no cause for complacency around the broader political economy of scholarly publishing, which remains wasteful, restrictive and inequitable on many fronts. And of course, the pernicious REF exercise itself, which this government signalled it would review, must be itself vigorously contested (more on this to come)."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open and Shut?: Dominique Babini on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Dominique Babini on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the ninth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Dominique Babini, Open Access Advocacy leader at the Latin American Council on Social Sciences (CLACSO). Based in Argentina, CLACSO is an academic network of 345 social science institutions, mainly in the universities of 21 of the region’s countries.

 In inviting people to take part in this Q&A series I have been conscious that much of the discussion about Open Access still tends to be dominated by those based in the developed world; or at least developing world voices are often drowned out by the excitable babble of agreement, disagreement, and frequent stalemate, that characterises the Open Access debate.  It has therefore never been entirely clear to me how stakeholders in the developing world view OA, and whether their views differ greatly from those that have dominated the OA conversation since it began in around 1994. In the hope of gaining a better understanding I plan to invite a number of people based in the developing world to take part in this series.  To start the ball rolling I am today publishing a Q&A with Dominique Babini, who is based at the University of Buenos Aires. Readers will judge for themselves how, and to what extent, Babini’s views differ from those we hear so often from those based in, say, North America or Europe."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open access mandate narrowed in formal proposals

Open access mandate narrowed in formal proposals | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Initial proposals published in February envisaged requiring a certain proportion of submitted monographs to be open access. However, among the 260 respondents to an informal consultation on the plans there was “widespread concern about the extent to which open access is reasonably achievable” for monographs.

For that reason, monographs will now be exempt from the mandate. However, the funding councils’ formal proposals, published for consultation on July 24, make clear the exemption will only be temporary “in view of our expectation that open access publication for monographs and books is likely to be achievable in the long term”.

The “overwhelming majority” of respondents to the informal consultation agreed that it is not currently feasible to require data sets to be open access. Hence, the first open access REF mandate will apply only to journal articles and conference proceedings whose authors include UK-based academics."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open and Shut?: Peter Suber on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Peter Suber on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the eighth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Peter Suber, de facto leader of the OA movement.

 Philosopher, jurist, and one-time stand-up comic, Peter Suber was one of the small group of people invited by the Soros Foundation to the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) meeting held in Hungary in 2001. It was in Budapest that the term Open Access was chosen, and a definition of OA agreed.  And it was Suber who drafted that definition, doing so with words that still stir, inspire, and motivate OA advocates everywhere. It was also Suber who chose to make the biggest sacrifice for the cause. In 2003 he gave up his position as a tenured full professor to become a full-time advocate for the movement, swapping secure employment for a series of uncertain, short-term grants."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open and Shut?: Danny Kingsley on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Danny Kingsley on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the seventh Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Danny Kingsley, Executive Officer of the Australian Open Access Support Group (AOASG), an organisation founded at the end of last year by six Australian universities in order to provide “a concerted and coordinated Australian voice in support of open access.”

 So far, 2013 has seen the OA scene dominated by events in the US and Europe. In the US, for instance, we have seen the publication of the OSTP Memorandum and the introduction of the FASTR bill in Congress. In Europe, the EU has committed to OA for its Horizon 2020 Framework Programme and the European Research Council has published its Guidelines for Open Access.  But it is the controversial OA Policy introduced on April 1st by Research Councils UK (RCUK) that has attracted the greatest attention (and opprobrium) within the OA movement, not least because of its stipulation that researchers favour Gold over Green OA, and its endorsement of Hybrid OA."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open and Shut?: Eloy Rodrigues on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Eloy Rodrigues on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the sixth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Eloy Rodrigues, Portuguese librarian and Director of the University of Minho’s Documentation Services. In any movement there are those who talk about what needs to be done and there are those who get on and do it. Judging by the limited number of posts that Eloy Rodrigues has made to the primary OA mailing list (GOAL) he does not belong to the former group. However, Google offers ample evidence that he regularly gives business-like presentations and workshops on OA"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

More Fell Fallout From Finch Folly: The Royal Society Relapse - Open Access Archivangelism

"Remaining a fair player, The Royal Society ensures that published open access articles bearing a publication fee are deducted from subscription prices through its Transparent Pricing Mechanism"

The Royal Society thereby pledges that it will not "double-dip" for hybrid Gold OA. The RS continues to collect subscription fees from institutions worldwide, but whatever additional revenue if gets from individual authors for hybrid Gold OA, it pledges to return as a subscription rebate to all subscribing institutions.

But does this mean the RS is a "fair player" insofar as OA is concerned?

Hardly.

Yet this is not because the hybrid Gold OA rebate amounts to individual authors' full payments for Gold OA subsidizing the subscription costs of institutions worldwide. (The author's own institution only gets back a tiny fraction of its authors' Gold OA fee in its tiny portion of the worldwide subscription rebate.)"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Academics: Ask not what Open Access can do for you, but what it can do for your disciplines

Academics: Ask not what Open Access can do for you, but what it can do for your disciplines | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Arguments for and against Open Access tend to focus on the needs of individual academics. Samuel Moore argues instead that advocates should spend more time emphasising how Open Access might benefit discipline-specific aims to encourage ownership of the movement from the ground up. Focusing on the specific needs of disciplines will help academic communities assess which of their publishing practices are beneficial and which merely persist out of tradition."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Nigel Vincent reflects on the Open Access monograph challenge

Nigel Vincent reflects on the Open Access monograph challenge | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Monographs are an intrinsically important mode of academic production and must not be sacrificed on the altar of open access, argues Nigel Vincent inDebating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. Book chapters are also a valuable and distinctive type of output which could find their visibility, and hence their viability, enhanced by an appropriate OA policy.

There are to date no agreed OA solutions in the domain of books. In developing OA models for books it is important that the peer review process as the guarantee of excellence is not compromised. Adoption of the untrammelled CC-BY licence is not appropriate for monographs and book chapters."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles

Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The principles underlying the Finch report – access, usability, quality, cost and sustainability – are broadly to be commended, writes Stuart M. Shieber in his chapter for Debating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. However, the report’s specific recommendations are short-term prescriptions that may lead to a limited increase in the amount of OA at a very high cost. In particular, it equates open access journals and hybrid journals, offering support to both of these models. However, the hybrid model entrenches the dysfunctional subscription model to the exclusion of the competitive and sustainable open access model. A preferable approach is to require authors to provide open access, but to be ecumenical about how that is achieved – through self-archiving or open access or hybrid journals – while providing support only for true open access journals"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open Access at Oxford » Open Access scenario 2: Going Green

Open Access at Oxford » Open Access scenario 2: Going Green | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the 2nd in the series of scenarios. We meet an MRC-funded Oxford University Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Professor. Professor Smith has published two papers since 1 April 2013, when the RCUK policy on Open Access came into effect. In the example provided below Professor Smith was able to publish her paper Open Access via the ‘green’ route. 

Professor Smith, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, supports the idea that research funded by taxpayers’ money should be made available open access. However, the access status of a particular journal is not her main criterion in deciding where to publish. When publishing she always asks members of her team: “Who do you want to read your paper?”

- “It is all about visibility, impact within communities and fit to the subject”, she says."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by RepoSupportProject
Scoop.it!

Open and Shut?: Where are we, what still needs to be done? Stevan Harnad on the state of Open Access

Open and Shut?: Where are we, what still needs to be done? Stevan Harnad on the state of Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The interview below is the second in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA) and what the priorities ought to be going forward. It is with self-styled archivangelist Stevan Harnad, who is currently Canada Research Chair in cognitive science at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and professor of web science at the University of Southampton.

 In 1994 Harnad posted an online message calling on all researchers to archive their papers on the Internet in order to make them freely accessible to their peers — a strategy that later became known as Green Open Access, or self-archiving. The message — which Harnad headed “The Subversive Proposal” — initiated a series of online exchanges, many of which were subsequently collected and published as a book in 1995."
more...
No comment yet.