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Open Access News from the RSP team
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Open and Shut?: Eloy Rodrigues on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Eloy Rodrigues on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the sixth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Eloy Rodrigues, Portuguese librarian and Director of the University of Minho’s Documentation Services. In any movement there are those who talk about what needs to be done and there are those who get on and do it. Judging by the limited number of posts that Eloy Rodrigues has made to the primary OA mailing list (GOAL) he does not belong to the former group. However, Google offers ample evidence that he regularly gives business-like presentations and workshops on OA"

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CALL: Host the Annual International Open Repositories Conference in 2015 | DuraSpace

CALL: Host the Annual International Open Repositories Conference in 2015 | DuraSpace | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The Open Repositories Steering Committee seeks proposals from candidate host organizations for the 2015 Annual International Open Repositories Conference. Proposals from all geographic areas will be given consideration.

Important Dates

The Open Repositories Steering Committee is accepting proposals to host the OR2015 conference until September 30, 2013. Initial expressions of interest or questions about OR2015 are encouraged and should be received by August 22, 2013.

Candidate institutions must have the ability to host a four-day conference of approximately 350-500 attendees (OR2012 held in Edinburgh, UK drew approximately 450 attendees). This includes appropriate access to conference facilities, lodging, and transportation, as well as the ability to manage a range of supporting services (food services, internet services, and conference social events; conference web site; management of registration and online payments; etc.). The candidate institutions and their local arrangements committee must have the means to support the costs of producing the conference through attendee registration and independent fundraising. The OR Steering Committee can provide further information on costs and fund-raising associated with recent conferences, or a sample proposal, to sites that have a potential interest in hosting the conference."

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Open and Shut?: Joseph Esposito on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Joseph Esposito on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the fifth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Joseph Esposito, President of Processed Media. In the nine years since I started my blog I have interviewed a great many people about OA. Very few of my interviewees, however, have been publishers. This has not been entirely by design, more a function of the fact that publishers tend to be reluctant to speak to me. There are doubtless a number of reasons for this reticence, not least a preference for speaking to the mainstream media, which can provide a great many more eyeballs for their messages than I can.

 It has been no surprise to me, therefore, that I have thus far been unable to post a response to my questions from a publisher. But I remain hopeful that success is just around the corner." 

 

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Training IT staff (ADMIRe) at the University of Nottingham (Laurian Williamson)

"Laurian Williamson talks about training IT staff in RDM at the University of Nottingham. Video presentation from the training workshop "Support for support: training those in RDM support roles" which was held at the University of East London (UEL) as part of the Jisc funded TraD Project. PDF of the presentation is available at http://www.uel.ac.uk/trad/outputs/pub...."


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Let’s hide our research from unworthy people | Open Science

"The Guardian recently published an article by Professor Robin Osborne under the controversial title “Why open access makes no sense”. The author sets out to prove that there is no such thing as free access to academic research, and having caused quite a stir, I think it is worth commenting.

Let’s start with a presentation of the main thesis proposed by Robin Osborne, according to which open access makes no sense. In essence, the fact that research is funded by the tax-payer does not mean that it becomes the property of the tax-payer, because research is not a product but the process.

I will not quote his full statement, which takes up almost the whole of the professor’s article. However, it is worth quoting two passages that explain the rational of his arguments"

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More Fell Fallout From Finch Folly: The Royal Society Relapse - Open Access Archivangelism

"Remaining a fair player, The Royal Society ensures that published open access articles bearing a publication fee are deducted from subscription prices through its Transparent Pricing Mechanism"

The Royal Society thereby pledges that it will not "double-dip" for hybrid Gold OA. The RS continues to collect subscription fees from institutions worldwide, but whatever additional revenue if gets from individual authors for hybrid Gold OA, it pledges to return as a subscription rebate to all subscribing institutions.

But does this mean the RS is a "fair player" insofar as OA is concerned?

Hardly.

Yet this is not because the hybrid Gold OA rebate amounts to individual authors' full payments for Gold OA subsidizing the subscription costs of institutions worldwide. (The author's own institution only gets back a tiny fraction of its authors' Gold OA fee in its tiny portion of the worldwide subscription rebate.)"

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OA monographs pose challenges for researchers and librarians - Research Information

"Last week’s Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference attracted several hundred delegates and a lively discussion, both at the event and online. Caren Milloy reports

For researchers and funders dismayed at the decline in monograph sales and the dwindling impact that this seems to suggest, open access (OA) publishing offers an exciting opportunity to make research available more widely. But, as delegates heard at early July’s Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference at the British Library, OA brings with it the need for fundamental new approaches from researchers, libraries and publishers."

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Conference Presentation (Slides): “Research Trends and Open Access Publishing” | LJ INFOdocket

"The character of the international research environment as an increasingly open and interoperating system is becoming more apparent. Funders are increasing their accountability requirements. An entirely new array of approaches, systems, metrics and standards for measuring research productivity and impact based on open content and metadata has emerged. The growth of the field of computational bibliometrics is being driven by social and political forces that do not appear to have reached a plateau. The large commercial publishers are aggressively marketing their research assessment products to universities and other research organizations."

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Open-access platform Libre launched

Open-access platform Libre launched | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Three academics are to launch a new open-access platform that they hope will allow researchers to wrest control of peer review from journals and remove academic publishers’ justification for charging high prices for their titles.

The Libre platform, due to be launched in October, will host open reviews of manuscripts solicited by the authors themselves. The authors will also be encouraged to continually update their manuscripts in the light of the ongoing comments.

Pandelis Perakakis, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Castellón in Spain and co-founder of Open Scholar, the UK-registered non-profit company that will run Libre, said that journals used their present “monopoly” on administering peer review to justify excessively high prices – even though the current model of peer review was flawed by conflicts of interest."

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Changing the game in the search for open access

"For the past few months, like chickens on eggs we have been sitting on what we think is a game changing idea. We’ve been sitting on it because despite trying as two student activists, we just haven’t found the help we need to make it a reality. So to preface what you’re about to read – we need your help.

It almost goes without saying that the current model of scientific publishing needs a rethink. Every day, academics, students and the public are denied access to the vital research they both need and paid for. Open Access is a solution to this problem; Open Access is the practice of providing unrestricted access via the Internet to peer-reviewed scholarly journal articles. If Open Access is new to you, we’d recommend you watch this video on Open Access before continuing on. You only need look to PLOS’ award program, or the story of Jack Andraka, the 16 year old who used Open Access papers to invent a diagnostic test for pancreatic cancer to understand the positive impact of open access to research."

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Why Robin Osborne makes no sense

Why Robin Osborne makes no sense | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Robin Osborne, professor of ancient history at King’s College, Cambridge, had an article in the Guardian yesterday entitled “Why open access makes no sense“. It was described by Peter Coles as “a spectacularly insular and arrogant argument”, by Peter Webster as an “Amazingly wrong-headed piece” and  by Glyn Moody as “easily the most arrogant & dim-witted article I’ve ever read on OA”.

Here’s my response (posted as a comment on the original article):

At a time when the world as a whole is waking up to the open-access imperative, it breaks my heart to read this fusty, elitist, reactionary piece, in which Professor Osborne ends up arguing strongly for his own irrelevance. What a tragic lack of vision, and of ambition."

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Open Access and the looming crisis in science

"Foundation essay: This article on the open access and science by Björn Brembs is part of a series marking the launch of The Conversation in the UK. Our foundation essays are longer than our usual comment and analysis articles and take a wider look at key issues affecting society.

There is a looming crisis in science, and we must act now to prevent it.

Currently, the number of scientific papers retracted from a large database of thousands of biomedical journals is a mere 0.05%, a low rate. But recently this rate has been rising. That rise is so quick that, if the trend were to continue, as many scientific publications will have to be retracted as are being published by about 2045."

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Promoting Open Access and Review (Publishing Reflection) | Readings 804

"To summarize Nawrotzki and Dougherty, the arrival of the internet has expanded historical readership, allowed more people to contribute to scholarship, and altered the process of doing history – yet the process of evaluating and publishing history has not changed significantly. There are three general areas in which progress can be made though it has been made slowly so far: 1. Open Access – making more scholarship available to a wider audience conveniently and at a lower cost. 2. Open Review – taking advantage of the web’s collaborative capabilities to improve the peer review. And 3. Improved publishing formats – creating scholarly content which exploits the capabilities of digital technology, rather than reproducing traditional formats electronically."

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Worth Reading: Open Access (the book), Interviews, Oregon State policy, and the Meaning of Open

Worth Reading: Open Access (the book), Interviews, Oregon State policy, and the Meaning of Open | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Peter Suber’s essential book Open Access is now, well, open access, one year after publication. It’s available in a variety of digital formats (scroll down to view), including HTML, PDF, ePUB, and Mobi. I also recommend the Internet Archive’s excellent streaming version, which I was unaware of until recently. Suber is also providing updates and supplements to the book. If you read only one book about open access, let it be this one!

Richard Poynder offers two new interviews on the current state of open access with Mike Taylor and Stevan Harnad. I tend to follow Taylor more than Harnad, and particularly like the former’s interview references to dispensing with journal prestige and the cost savings that will come with OA. I’m skeptical that Harnad’s vision of universal green (archived) OA will come to pass, though I think article archiving is an immensely valuable stopgap effort until more OA journals are up and running."

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SPARCing debate on Open Access

SPARCing debate on Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"As part of our field work in Washington DC last month I met with Heather Joseph who is Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), a membership organization of academic and research libraries. Their mission is to make libraries and the information they hold more equitable and more open, and they count more than 800 institutions among their membership.

Heather gave a great overview of where SPARC have been in the past and where they see themselves in the future.  She began by noting that there remain barriers to providing high quality information on campus, and the subscription model impedes possibilities for innovation."

 

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Open access: brought to book at last?

Open access: brought to book at last? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"A library-focused effort aims to take monographs off the analogue shelf. 

It would be easy to think of monographs as the scholarly output that the open-access movement forgot.

Mandates for free online access are popping up all around the world, but most relate exclusively to journal articles. A good example is Research Councils UK’s new open-access policy, launched in April and inspired by the Finch report published last year. That report dismissed monographs as too difficult a nut to crack in the absence of “further experimentation”.

The UK funding councils were slightly bolder. Their preliminary consultation on introducing an open-access mandate for the next research excellence framework, expected in 2020, included a question about whether a percentage of submitted monographs should be required to be open access."

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Springer Renews its Commitment to Open Access

"Springer Science+Business Mediaannounced that the influence of its open access (OA) journals has increased over the past year.

In Thomson Reuters’ new edition of Journal Citation Reports for 2012, which calculates a journal’s impact factor in the industry based on its articles’ cited references, 46 Springer journals received an impact factor for the first time, meaning that their citation data improved over the year. Springer now has 1,539 journals with impact factors from Thomson Reuters, out of its full publishing program of 2,200 titles last year.

Springer received more good news from the report: 86% of its journal titles have increased citations, and 55% increased their impact factor numbers.

Springer now has 163 OA journals with an impact factor, which is 41% of its entire OA output.

“Not only did our overall numbers grow, but nearly one half of those with new impact factors were open access. This reaffirms the importance of peer-reviewed publications supported by different models,” says Peter Hendriks, president of scientific, technical, and medical publishing at Springer"

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New horizons for Open Access Policies in Europe and Research Data Management in Libraries

"Presentations from the LIBER 2013 workshop on Scholarly Communication and Research Infrastructures: : 'New Horizons for Open Access Policies in Europe' and 'Ten Recommendations on Research Data Management - What's Next?'"

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Open and Shut?: Heather Joseph on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Heather Joseph on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the fourth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Heather Joseph.

 A former journal publisher, Joseph has in her time worked for both Elsevier and the American Society for Cell Biology (ACSB). In 2005, however, she changed direction and became Executive Director for the Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), an alliance of academic and research libraries created in 1998 by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). SPARC’s original mission was to “use libraries’ buying power to nurture the creation of high-quality, low-priced publication outlets for peer-reviewed scientific, technical, and medical research.”
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Open Access at Oxford » Open Access scenario 3: RCUK & CC BY – a ‘journey’ towards compliance

"In the 3rd in the series of Open Access scenarios we meet an EPSRC-funded Oxford University Professor working in the Department of Physics. The example demonstrates the decisions taken when the journal of choice did not offer the re-use license mandated by RCUK for compliance with their policy.

Professor Smith’s latest research project is funded by EPSRC. Since 1 April he has published one paper from the project, which he made available Open Access via the Green route i.e. deposited the accepted manuscript both in the subject repository, arXiv, and the University’s own repository, ORA.  This is what Professor Smith has been used to doing within his discipline."

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Academics: Ask not what Open Access can do for you, but what it can do for your disciplines

Academics: Ask not what Open Access can do for you, but what it can do for your disciplines | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Arguments for and against Open Access tend to focus on the needs of individual academics. Samuel Moore argues instead that advocates should spend more time emphasising how Open Access might benefit discipline-specific aims to encourage ownership of the movement from the ground up. Focusing on the specific needs of disciplines will help academic communities assess which of their publishing practices are beneficial and which merely persist out of tradition."

 

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Busting the top five myths about open access publishing

"Rather than lock up knowledge in costly journals, increasingly universities and governments are recognising that publicly funded research should be open to all.

This past year has seen new open access policies in the United Kingdom, the United States and from the European Commission. In Australia too, the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC) now both have open access policies.

Despite this activity, there remains a large amount of confusion about open access, with many misunderstandings persisting in the academic community and in universities"

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Open access. Why would an intermediary be involved? | SwetsBlog

"Open access presents some interesting challenges for both libraries and publishers. While the publisher side has been very well documented over the past few years, the impact open access will have on the rest of the content supply chain has been less well explored, particularly in terms of the potential role of an intermediary like Swets.

There are important and functional processes that a third-party service provider might help with related to the growth of open access publishing. In the case of increasing levels of gold open access papers, there will be an equal growth in the processing of author fees (article processing charges, or APCs), which will require high levels of administration and often brand new workflows for both libraries, publishers and funding organizations. In Swets’ case, our global support infrastructure could provide real value here by taking the time-consuming tasks out of the hands of the library so they can focus on the delivery of content and helping their authors and readers directly, providing information, training and support for publishing and discovering open access content."

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We cannot afford to keep research results locked away in ivory towers

We cannot afford to keep research results locked away in ivory towers | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Opening up British research may seem obvious, writes science minister David Willetts. But it is not just inertia that blocks this. The UK government is committed to greater transparency across the board. That is partly because, as David Cameron says, sunlight is the best disinfectant. There are other reasons for more transparency too, such as giving people the tools to fulfil their aspirations. Choosing the wrong course can be an expensive and dispiriting error. So we have published 17 pieces of comparable information on each university course. People from families with little history of higher education no longer have to fill in their UCAS forms in the dark."

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