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Open and Shut?: Dominique Babini on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Dominique Babini on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the ninth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Dominique Babini, Open Access Advocacy leader at the Latin American Council on Social Sciences (CLACSO). Based in Argentina, CLACSO is an academic network of 345 social science institutions, mainly in the universities of 21 of the region’s countries.

 In inviting people to take part in this Q&A series I have been conscious that much of the discussion about Open Access still tends to be dominated by those based in the developed world; or at least developing world voices are often drowned out by the excitable babble of agreement, disagreement, and frequent stalemate, that characterises the Open Access debate.  It has therefore never been entirely clear to me how stakeholders in the developing world view OA, and whether their views differ greatly from those that have dominated the OA conversation since it began in around 1994. In the hope of gaining a better understanding I plan to invite a number of people based in the developing world to take part in this series.  To start the ball rolling I am today publishing a Q&A with Dominique Babini, who is based at the University of Buenos Aires. Readers will judge for themselves how, and to what extent, Babini’s views differ from those we hear so often from those based in, say, North America or Europe."
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Does mandatory policy help Open Access? | Open Science

Does mandatory policy help Open Access? | Open Science | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"How to disseminate Open Access? How to convince scholars, universities and research institutions that OA may help in the development of science? These questions are a never-ending topic of discussion in the scientific community. There are also many answers to these questions, and one of them is a mandatory OA policy for scientists, established by a government or university. However, the question is: does it really work?

The mandatory policy for OA has its supporters and opponents and this division can be observed pretty well during the discussions on the new regulations in the UK. The opponents may say that new rules favor one type of OA and marginalize the other (Gold vs. Green), that the objectivity and freedom of scientific research may be compromised, that freedom of choice is being limited, or that those who control funding will have undue influence on what is being published and where.

Many of these arguments may, or indeed touch upon the real threats that may arise with the introduction of top-down rules for OA. Unfortunately, there is always a shortage of funds for science, research and publishing. Each institution introducing rules concerning OA, whether it is a university or government, will take into account the financial factor and try to choose the best compromise. Of course, you can always argue whether the solution actually supports OA and scientists or not."

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The Global Research Council: Open Access increases the quality of research communication | Open Science

The Global Research Council: Open Access increases the quality of research communication | Open Science | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"More than two weeks ago the 2nd Annual Global Meeting of the Global Research Council in Berlin had ended. The conference gathered the heads of 70 research-funding organizations from around the world. Among the many topics discussed was also the matter of Open Access.

In the last few years Open Access has spread quickly and become a very important factor in the development of science. This state of affairs is confirmed not only by the growing number of OA publishers and publications, but also by the increase in the funding of OA by universities and research institutions, as well as by governmental measures in the support of Open Access in many countries."

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Implementing Open Access in the United Kingdom - Information Services and Use - Volume 33, Number 1 / 2013 - IOS Press

Implementing Open Access in the United Kingdom - Information Services and Use - Volume 33, Number 1 / 2013 - IOS Press | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Since July 2012, the UK has been undergoing an organized transition to open access. As of 01 April 2013, revised open access policies are coming into effect. Open access implementation requires new infrastructures for funding publishing. Universities as institutions increasingly will be central to managing article-processing charges, monitoring compliance and organizing deposit. This article reviews the implementation praxis between July 2012 and April 2013, including ongoing controversy and review, which has mainly focussed on embargo length."

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Activism or science? A debate on open access.

Activism or science? A debate on open access. | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Yesterday, I hit a nerve on Twitter. Ok, more than one. But it resulted in a great discussion about open access and brought up some interesting questions. I’d like to take the opportunity to explain in more detail what I meant and did not mean by my tweet. And then I’d like to open up the discussion further. But first, the backstory.

I am writing a systematic review. For those not familiar with the concept, this is not simply summarizing work others have done in a particular area of research. It involves designing searches, implementing filters, and clearly outlining criteria for selecting or excluding articles. The idea is to give a complete overview of the literature and be able to quantify, for example, what percentage of studies in the research area used a certain technique, or arrived at a common conclusion."

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Nigel Vincent reflects on the Open Access monograph challenge

Nigel Vincent reflects on the Open Access monograph challenge | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Monographs are an intrinsically important mode of academic production and must not be sacrificed on the altar of open access, argues Nigel Vincent inDebating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. Book chapters are also a valuable and distinctive type of output which could find their visibility, and hence their viability, enhanced by an appropriate OA policy.

There are to date no agreed OA solutions in the domain of books. In developing OA models for books it is important that the peer review process as the guarantee of excellence is not compromised. Adoption of the untrammelled CC-BY licence is not appropriate for monographs and book chapters."

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Open access inaction

Open access inaction | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

Jack Stilgoe: From time to time, it's important to pause the bureaucratic debate about open access and recognise how stupid scientific publishing is. Like many academics, I am currently trying to work out what I should think and do about open access. I share with many scientists strong personal commitments to the idea of openness. I am in this game because I think research is valuable, and I work at a University because I like the idea that research that should be in the public interest should mostly be publicly funded. Like many other academics, I find it utterly daft that such research is paywalled. Unlike some academics, I do not presume that the people who are able to get past these paywalls (other academics at rich universities) are the only relevant readers."

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