Open Access News from the RSP team
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Activism or science? A debate on open access.

Activism or science? A debate on open access. | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Yesterday, I hit a nerve on Twitter. Ok, more than one. But it resulted in a great discussion about open access and brought up some interesting questions. I’d like to take the opportunity to explain in more detail what I meant and did not mean by my tweet. And then I’d like to open up the discussion further. But first, the backstory.

I am writing a systematic review. For those not familiar with the concept, this is not simply summarizing work others have done in a particular area of research. It involves designing searches, implementing filters, and clearly outlining criteria for selecting or excluding articles. The idea is to give a complete overview of the literature and be able to quantify, for example, what percentage of studies in the research area used a certain technique, or arrived at a common conclusion."

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Open Access at Oxford » CC BY: what does it mean for scholarly articles?

Open Access at Oxford » CC BY: what does it mean for scholarly articles? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"A number of the enquiries to the Open Access Enquiries mailing list have asked us how the various types of Creative Commons licence specifically relate to scholarly articles. So, in this blog post we explain the rights that the CC BY licence grants to the reader (i.e. the licensee).

The RCUK policy currently mandates use of the Creative Commons ‘Attribution’ licence (CC BY) when an Article Processing Charge (APC) is levied. This licence allows others to distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the licensed work, including for commercial purposes, as long as the original author is credited. It is the most liberal of the six Creative Commons licences in comparison with, for example, CC BY-ND (no derivatives, no modifications) and CC BY-NC  (no commercial use)."

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Promoting Open Access and Review (Publishing Reflection) | Readings 804

"To summarize Nawrotzki and Dougherty, the arrival of the internet has expanded historical readership, allowed more people to contribute to scholarship, and altered the process of doing history – yet the process of evaluating and publishing history has not changed significantly. There are three general areas in which progress can be made though it has been made slowly so far: 1. Open Access – making more scholarship available to a wider audience conveniently and at a lower cost. 2. Open Review – taking advantage of the web’s collaborative capabilities to improve the peer review. And 3. Improved publishing formats – creating scholarly content which exploits the capabilities of digital technology, rather than reproducing traditional formats electronically."

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