Open Access News from the RSP team
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HEFCE, the State of Open Access in the UK and Post-2014 REF

HEFCE, the State of Open Access in the UK and Post-2014 REF | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Having returned from a glorious week away in Crotia and Bosnia (for Pynchon fans: it was “very nice, very nice, very nice indeed”), I have returned to an inbox that features the current state of play with HEFCE’s thinking on open access mandates for a post-2014 REF. In order to ensure that I’ve got it straight in my own head, I thought I’d write a summary post for quick reference. I’m using the PDF version as my reference. This refers to the 16th July 2013 document."

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Rachel H's curator insight, August 21, 2013 9:48 AM

Very helpful summary from @martin_eve of the current HEFCE consultation doc on OA for post-2014 REF

 

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Harnad Response to HEFCE REF OA Policy Consultation - Open Access Archivangelism

Harnad Response to HEFCE REF OA Policy Consultation - Open Access Archivangelism | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Question 1: Do you agree that the criteria for open access are appropriate (subject to clarification on whether accessibility should follow immediately on acceptance or on publication)?

YES

1.1 The HEFCE REF OA Policy should apply to the refereed, accepted version of peer-reviewed research articles or refereed conference articles.

1.2 It should be deposited in the author’s HEI repository, immediately upon acceptance for publication.

1.3 Access to the deposit should be immediately Open Access where possible, or, where deemed necessary, it can be made Closed Access if the publisher requires an OA embargo.

1.4 The crucial thing is that the deposit should be made at time of acceptance, time-stamped as such, with a copy of the acceptance letter to serve as the date marker.

The proposal is excellent. And if adopted and effectively implemented, it will serve as a model for OA policies worldwide.



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Advocating for Open Access ~ libfocus - Irish library blog

Advocating for Open Access ~ libfocus - Irish library blog | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"While some librarians are for- and some librarians are against- open access, I sit in the former camp. I am not going to preach about the benefits of OA, which are well documented, I’m just going to state that for me and others, including governments, the debate on OA is over. It is an inevitable progression of scholarly communication in the digital information age. Furthermore, it is an important evolution of science & knowledge. How we implement OA via Gold or Green is however worthy of discussion. It will be interesting to see how the UK fairs out in this regard, especially when most other English speaking countries and areas are going the Green route (USA, Ireland, Australia, EU).

 When advocating for OA I find it is useful to start with policy and it’s important to keep up to date with this area as it is evolving. For a good global overview on OA policies please see this Canadian overview and this Australian overview. The next challenge is infrastructure and the EU has been stepping up progress in this regard, by providing a dedicated site with resources for Repository Managers, Researchers & Project Co-Coordinators on OpenAire. In some EU countries (Denmark, Bulgaria, Croatia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, UK) national open access groups have formed to look at policy and its implementation particularly with regard to Horizon 2020 funded projects across European countries."

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OASPA’s response to Request for Input – Finch Report: Survey of Progress, 14 June 2013 | Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association

"Background

We thank you for the opportunity to provide input to the Finch Report: Survey of Progress.

The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) represents the interests of Open Access publishers of journals and books, with the aim of expanding Open Access publishing while contributing to the development of standards and best practices in all areas of scholarly publishing. OASPA’s membership currently includes more than 60 full voting members, who range from independent OA journals that are run by small groups of researchers to many of the largest and most well-recognised publishers within the scholarly publishing industry."

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Getting Somewhere: HEFCE Proposals on Open Access for a Post-2014 Research Excellence Framework

Getting Somewhere: HEFCE Proposals on Open Access for a Post-2014 Research Excellence Framework | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This week, the UK’s Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) published their formal proposals for including an open access requirement in any post-2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). Responses to this will be accepted until 30th October 2013. These proposals follow a pre-consultation letter and set of responses which were submitted earlier in the year (link to University of Cambridge response).

Following up our concerns about the policy raised over the last few months (here and here, further posts here) the present iteration represents a decent outcome on some of the details, not least because it defers quite a few of them. That these issues have been deferred does not mean that they do not matter; rather it means that the battles on them will be fought elsewhere – with universities, with journal boards, with learned societies, with publishers and their lawyers and so on. Moreover, there is no cause for complacency around the broader political economy of scholarly publishing, which remains wasteful, restrictive and inequitable on many fronts. And of course, the pernicious REF exercise itself, which this government signalled it would review, must be itself vigorously contested (more on this to come)."

 

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2013-Open access consultation launched - HEFCE

"Views are invited on the open access proposals for the post-2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF).

The four UK higher education funding bodies aim to further increase the proportion of research outputs published in open-access form by introducing this as a requirement in the next REF [Notes 1 and 2]. This is in line with the funding bodies’ policy that the outputs from all research supported by our funding should be as widely and freely accessible as the available channels for dissemination permit. 

The proposals set out the details for implementing this requirement, and were developed following the advice received by the funding bodies in response to our earlier letter on open access. The consultation document is available on the HEFCE web-site. It seeks comments on the proposed criteria for open access in the post-2014 REF, the definition of the research outputs to which the criteria should apply, and the proposed approaches to exceptions from the open access requirement. The proposals have no relevance to the current REF 2014 exercise."

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Does mandatory policy help Open Access? | Open Science

Does mandatory policy help Open Access? | Open Science | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"How to disseminate Open Access? How to convince scholars, universities and research institutions that OA may help in the development of science? These questions are a never-ending topic of discussion in the scientific community. There are also many answers to these questions, and one of them is a mandatory OA policy for scientists, established by a government or university. However, the question is: does it really work?

The mandatory policy for OA has its supporters and opponents and this division can be observed pretty well during the discussions on the new regulations in the UK. The opponents may say that new rules favor one type of OA and marginalize the other (Gold vs. Green), that the objectivity and freedom of scientific research may be compromised, that freedom of choice is being limited, or that those who control funding will have undue influence on what is being published and where.

Many of these arguments may, or indeed touch upon the real threats that may arise with the introduction of top-down rules for OA. Unfortunately, there is always a shortage of funds for science, research and publishing. Each institution introducing rules concerning OA, whether it is a university or government, will take into account the financial factor and try to choose the best compromise. Of course, you can always argue whether the solution actually supports OA and scientists or not."

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Emerald Not So Sparkling Green

Emerald Not So Sparkling Green | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"If your field is management, economics, healthcare, education, or library science, chances are you’re familiar with the journal publisher Emerald.  For a long time, true to its name, Emerald was a “green” open access publisher — that is, it allowed authors to immediately make their articles open access by self-archiving them in an online repository.  A shining, sparkling example of greenness."

 

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