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Does mandatory policy help Open Access? | Open Science

Does mandatory policy help Open Access? | Open Science | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"How to disseminate Open Access? How to convince scholars, universities and research institutions that OA may help in the development of science? These questions are a never-ending topic of discussion in the scientific community. There are also many answers to these questions, and one of them is a mandatory OA policy for scientists, established by a government or university. However, the question is: does it really work?

The mandatory policy for OA has its supporters and opponents and this division can be observed pretty well during the discussions on the new regulations in the UK. The opponents may say that new rules favor one type of OA and marginalize the other (Gold vs. Green), that the objectivity and freedom of scientific research may be compromised, that freedom of choice is being limited, or that those who control funding will have undue influence on what is being published and where.

Many of these arguments may, or indeed touch upon the real threats that may arise with the introduction of top-down rules for OA. Unfortunately, there is always a shortage of funds for science, research and publishing. Each institution introducing rules concerning OA, whether it is a university or government, will take into account the financial factor and try to choose the best compromise. Of course, you can always argue whether the solution actually supports OA and scientists or not."

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Research Fundermentals: An Introduction to Open Access

Research Fundermentals: An Introduction to Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"An Introduction to Open Access

  This week sees the introduction of the University's Open Access Policy. For those who are new to OA, I thought it would be useful to post a brief introduction to it.

Broad definition

Open Access (OA) is the practice of allowing academic outputs to be available to all, free of charge. Generally this applies to journal articles, but some effort is being made to apply OA to monographs and other outputs.

OA takes two forms:
'Green': in which an article is archived in a freely accessible online repository (such as KAR);'Gold:' in which an article is made freely available through a journal without subscription. Some publishers levy an 'article processing charge' (APC) for allowing an article to be made available OA."
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Openness and visibility / A current awareness bulletin for ACP agriculture

Openness and visibility / A current awareness bulletin for ACP agriculture | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The increasing focus on opening access to information is affecting agricultural research and development, explains Stephen Rudgard. There has been an increasing focus, globally, on various aspects of the ‘openness’ of information and knowledge since the early 2000s – open data, open access, open knowledge, open source, and so on. This openness involves, and is affecting, the world of agricultural information and knowledge as much as any other field of research and development. The impacts are being felt at individual, institutional and national and international levels, from policy development to the day-to-day behaviour of individuals."

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Emerald Not So Sparkling Green

Emerald Not So Sparkling Green | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"If your field is management, economics, healthcare, education, or library science, chances are you’re familiar with the journal publisher Emerald.  For a long time, true to its name, Emerald was a “green” open access publisher — that is, it allowed authors to immediately make their articles open access by self-archiving them in an online repository.  A shining, sparkling example of greenness."

 

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