Open Access News from the RSP team
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Open and Shut?: Heather Joseph on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Heather Joseph on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the fourth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Heather Joseph.

 A former journal publisher, Joseph has in her time worked for both Elsevier and the American Society for Cell Biology (ACSB). In 2005, however, she changed direction and became Executive Director for the Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), an alliance of academic and research libraries created in 1998 by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). SPARC’s original mission was to “use libraries’ buying power to nurture the creation of high-quality, low-priced publication outlets for peer-reviewed scientific, technical, and medical research.”
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Open access. Why would an intermediary be involved? | SwetsBlog

"Open access presents some interesting challenges for both libraries and publishers. While the publisher side has been very well documented over the past few years, the impact open access will have on the rest of the content supply chain has been less well explored, particularly in terms of the potential role of an intermediary like Swets.

There are important and functional processes that a third-party service provider might help with related to the growth of open access publishing. In the case of increasing levels of gold open access papers, there will be an equal growth in the processing of author fees (article processing charges, or APCs), which will require high levels of administration and often brand new workflows for both libraries, publishers and funding organizations. In Swets’ case, our global support infrastructure could provide real value here by taking the time-consuming tasks out of the hands of the library so they can focus on the delivery of content and helping their authors and readers directly, providing information, training and support for publishing and discovering open access content."

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Open Access and the looming crisis in science

"Foundation essay: This article on the open access and science by Björn Brembs is part of a series marking the launch of The Conversation in the UK. Our foundation essays are longer than our usual comment and analysis articles and take a wider look at key issues affecting society.

There is a looming crisis in science, and we must act now to prevent it.

Currently, the number of scientific papers retracted from a large database of thousands of biomedical journals is a mere 0.05%, a low rate. But recently this rate has been rising. That rise is so quick that, if the trend were to continue, as many scientific publications will have to be retracted as are being published by about 2045."

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Open Access Publishing: A Catalyst for Scholarly Research Publication

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Bridging the gap between academia and Wikipedia | Jisc

Bridging the gap between academia and Wikipedia | Jisc | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Jisc and Wikimedia UK are collaborating on a project to bring the academic world and Wikipedia closer together. This will create opportunities for researchers, educators, and the general public to contribute to the world's freely available knowledge.

Jisc, the UK education charity championing the use of digital technology in education and research,  is supporting this initiative so that the widest possible audience will benefit from the world-leading projects that it supports. These include open educational resources, online repositories of research, and collections such as the 19th century newspapers archive and Manuscripts Online, which holds British written and early printed materials from 1000 to 1500AD."

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The Global Research Council: Open Access increases the quality of research communication | Open Science

The Global Research Council: Open Access increases the quality of research communication | Open Science | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"More than two weeks ago the 2nd Annual Global Meeting of the Global Research Council in Berlin had ended. The conference gathered the heads of 70 research-funding organizations from around the world. Among the many topics discussed was also the matter of Open Access.

In the last few years Open Access has spread quickly and become a very important factor in the development of science. This state of affairs is confirmed not only by the growing number of OA publishers and publications, but also by the increase in the funding of OA by universities and research institutions, as well as by governmental measures in the support of Open Access in many countries."

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Open Access Comments: June's Featured News

Open Access Comments: June's Featured News | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Open Access Comments is a new website with daily feed of news that will focus on conversations around open access, open licensing, open students, open scientists, open repositories, open libraries and similar open values. I invite you to join the debate where I will be mostly editing the news as well as the monthly summary of ten most interesting topics discussed on the site."

 

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SPARCing debate on Open Access

SPARCing debate on Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"As part of our field work in Washington DC last month I met with Heather Joseph who is Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), a membership organization of academic and research libraries. Their mission is to make libraries and the information they hold more equitable and more open, and they count more than 800 institutions among their membership.

Heather gave a great overview of where SPARC have been in the past and where they see themselves in the future.  She began by noting that there remain barriers to providing high quality information on campus, and the subscription model impedes possibilities for innovation."

 

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OA monographs pose challenges for researchers and librarians - Research Information

"Last week’s Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference attracted several hundred delegates and a lively discussion, both at the event and online. Caren Milloy reports

For researchers and funders dismayed at the decline in monograph sales and the dwindling impact that this seems to suggest, open access (OA) publishing offers an exciting opportunity to make research available more widely. But, as delegates heard at early July’s Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference at the British Library, OA brings with it the need for fundamental new approaches from researchers, libraries and publishers."

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We cannot afford to keep research results locked away in ivory towers

We cannot afford to keep research results locked away in ivory towers | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Opening up British research may seem obvious, writes science minister David Willetts. But it is not just inertia that blocks this. The UK government is committed to greater transparency across the board. That is partly because, as David Cameron says, sunlight is the best disinfectant. There are other reasons for more transparency too, such as giving people the tools to fulfil their aspirations. Choosing the wrong course can be an expensive and dispiriting error. So we have published 17 pieces of comparable information on each university course. People from families with little history of higher education no longer have to fill in their UCAS forms in the dark."

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Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles

Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The principles underlying the Finch report – access, usability, quality, cost and sustainability – are broadly to be commended, writes Stuart M. Shieber in his chapter for Debating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. However, the report’s specific recommendations are short-term prescriptions that may lead to a limited increase in the amount of OA at a very high cost. In particular, it equates open access journals and hybrid journals, offering support to both of these models. However, the hybrid model entrenches the dysfunctional subscription model to the exclusion of the competitive and sustainable open access model. A preferable approach is to require authors to provide open access, but to be ecumenical about how that is achieved – through self-archiving or open access or hybrid journals – while providing support only for true open access journals"

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Open access on the conference circuit

"Having devoted a fair number of the words on this blog to open access over the past year and a half, I have found myself invited to an increasing number of meetings on the topic. Whether run by RLUK, the Royal Society or the LSE, these meetings have invariably been interesting, but they often seem to bring together many of the same people, mostly from libraries, funders, publishers and learned societies.

And when we get together at some point one or the other of us bemoans that fact that despite holding all these meetings, the word on OA and the policy developments in the wake of the Finch report, appear to be diffusing only slowly into the world of academia. I have little doubt that there are many librarians around the country working hard to bring their faculty members up to date — and the British Academy has recently done some sterling work. Nevertheless I sense that progress is on the slow side"

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The bottom line is that journals cost money

The bottom line is that journals cost money | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Open access is a utopian pipe dream, says Richard Hoyle. A recent issue of Times Higher Education featured a journal editor’s view of open access. The author, Gabriel Egan of De Montfort University, is all for it (“Green-eyed, no monster”, Opinion, 6 June). Indeed, he looks forward to one of the journals he edits, Theatre Notebook, becoming “an online-only, open-access offering”. Egan’s future is entirely digital. For this journal editor, however, this is an entirely implausible prospect."

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New copyright laws give researchers right to conduct 'electronic analysis' of copied content

"Researchers that wish to conduct "electronic analysis" of copyrighted content for non-commercial purposes will have a right to copy that information under proposed new copyright laws.

The Government has set out draft new legislation that would introduce a new exception to conduct data analysis for non-commercial research (3-page / 72KB PDF) into UK copyright law.

The new exception would provide non-commercial researchers with a right to make a free copy of published information that is freely accessible or to which they otherwise have a right to access. However, the exception has been drafted in a way that would allow publishers to put in place a paywall to prevent researchers' making copies of their material for free."

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GoldOA News | Gold Open Access Infrastructure

Does a model for machine-readable licences continue to have a role in an Open Access future?

 

Getting on for a decade ago, Digital Library Federation’s Electronic Resource Management Initiative (ERMI) identified a need for machine-interpretable expressions of the licences issued by publishers for the use of electronic resources in libraries. The sheer number and variety of licences for e-resources which were in use made it impossible for anyone to know (at the point of use) the terms under which a particular resource was available, and whether it could therefore be used in a given context. This was very different from the historic situation with physical resources where the terms of use were essentially uniform, governed by law rather than by licence, and generally understood and respected by librarians and library patrons alike.

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