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Open Access News from the RSP team
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Open Washing and Open Access Publishing

"Open Access stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse.1

As discussed earlier in this blog it is obvious that non-commercial and non-derivatives licenses do not comply with the requirements of the Budapest Open Access Initiative, the RCUK Open Access policy and the Berlin Declaration. All these licences have to be considered as totally incompatible with “Open Access” publishing.

If you look at the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and the new Directory of Open Access Monographs (DOAB), you will find most of the publications listed are using non-commercial and non-derivatives licenses which are not open in Terms of the Definition of “Open”. Even if the metadata in DOAJ and DOAB is licensed under an open license (CC-BY-SA), they do not list true “Open Access” publications as they promise. These two open access directories are just two of many examples of an ongoing threat of the idea of unrestricted access and reuse of academic publications."

 

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Open and Shut?: Joseph Esposito on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Joseph Esposito on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the fifth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Joseph Esposito, President of Processed Media. In the nine years since I started my blog I have interviewed a great many people about OA. Very few of my interviewees, however, have been publishers. This has not been entirely by design, more a function of the fact that publishers tend to be reluctant to speak to me. There are doubtless a number of reasons for this reticence, not least a preference for speaking to the mainstream media, which can provide a great many more eyeballs for their messages than I can.

 It has been no surprise to me, therefore, that I have thus far been unable to post a response to my questions from a publisher. But I remain hopeful that success is just around the corner." 

 

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Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles

Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The principles underlying the Finch report – access, usability, quality, cost and sustainability – are broadly to be commended, writes Stuart M. Shieber in his chapter for Debating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. However, the report’s specific recommendations are short-term prescriptions that may lead to a limited increase in the amount of OA at a very high cost. In particular, it equates open access journals and hybrid journals, offering support to both of these models. However, the hybrid model entrenches the dysfunctional subscription model to the exclusion of the competitive and sustainable open access model. A preferable approach is to require authors to provide open access, but to be ecumenical about how that is achieved – through self-archiving or open access or hybrid journals – while providing support only for true open access journals"

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Guide to Creative Commons » OAPEN-UK

Guide to Creative Commons » OAPEN-UK | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"An output of the OAPEN-UK project, this guide explores concerns expressed in public evidence given by researchers, learned societies and publishers to inquiries in the House of Commons and the House of Lords, and also concerns expressed by researchers working with the OAPEN-UK project. We have also identified a number of common questions and have drafted answers, which have been checked by experts including Creative Commons. The guide has been edited by active researchers, to make sure that it is relevant and useful to academics faced with making decisions about publishing.

This guide is made available in open access using a CC BY licence. Readers can view the guide online (see below) or downlaod a PDF copy. Print copies are also available – please contact Caren Milloy to order."

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Open access policy : The Lancet

"We welcome The Lancet's stance on open access (April 6, p 1166).1 We note that you wish to review how you can make all publicly funded research as accessible and usable as possible. However, we also note that even with the announced changes, The Lancet will still have less free access than other key general medical journals. For example, there is free access to all research articles in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) after 6 months from 1998, in the New England Journal of Medicine after 6 months from 1990, and in The British Medical Journal immediately from 1840 onwards."
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Open Access at Oxford » Oxford researchers’ perspectives on Open Access

"During the period preceding 1st April the researchers from IT Services attached to the OAO project explored Oxford researchers’ existing awareness of, and attitudes towards, Open Access. We spoke with nine individuals in research roles – PIs of research teams and individual researchers – and a small number of doctoral students. However, in this blog post I also draw from our conversations with librarians and research facilitators where these provided additional insights into academics’ perspectives"

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Open access mandate narrowed in formal proposals

Open access mandate narrowed in formal proposals | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Initial proposals published in February envisaged requiring a certain proportion of submitted monographs to be open access. However, among the 260 respondents to an informal consultation on the plans there was “widespread concern about the extent to which open access is reasonably achievable” for monographs.

For that reason, monographs will now be exempt from the mandate. However, the funding councils’ formal proposals, published for consultation on July 24, make clear the exemption will only be temporary “in view of our expectation that open access publication for monographs and books is likely to be achievable in the long term”.

The “overwhelming majority” of respondents to the informal consultation agreed that it is not currently feasible to require data sets to be open access. Hence, the first open access REF mandate will apply only to journal articles and conference proceedings whose authors include UK-based academics."

 

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SPARCing debate on Open Access

SPARCing debate on Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"As part of our field work in Washington DC last month I met with Heather Joseph who is Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), a membership organization of academic and research libraries. Their mission is to make libraries and the information they hold more equitable and more open, and they count more than 800 institutions among their membership.

Heather gave a great overview of where SPARC have been in the past and where they see themselves in the future.  She began by noting that there remain barriers to providing high quality information on campus, and the subscription model impedes possibilities for innovation."

 

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"The book is a conversation". Really ?

"The book is a conversation". Really ? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Par­ti­cu­larly well orga­ni­zed and offe­ring a first-choice pro­gram, the confe­rence will remain in my memory as one of the most inter­es­ting that I was able to attend. Long confi­ned to very mar­gi­nal posi­tion of expe­ri­men­ta­tion, the open access publi­ca­tion of books in the huma­ni­ties is clearly beco­ming impor­tant today. It is true that the debate on open access to research results after the Finch report or the euro­pean recom­men­da­tion, was focu­sed until now not on huma­ni­ties mono­graphs, but rather on jour­nals, and firstly in science. Nevertheless, the great hall of the Confe­rence Cen­ter of the BL was packed and it reflec­ted the gro­wing inter­est in this issue in the aca­de­mic community. And from begin­ning to end of the confe­rence, we felt very clearly that the context was changing. Complementarity with the Ber­lin Confe­rence EPA in 2013 that I was also able to attend ear­lier this year is remar­kable: more tech­ni­cal and more focu­sed on eco­no­mic models, the Ber­lin confe­rence also sho­wed the same trend. In Lon­don, the conver­sa­tion was more theo­re­ti­cal, more intel­lec­tual, and was just as interesting."

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Open Government Licence v2.0 | The National Archives

Open Government Licence v2.0 | The National Archives | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The National Archives has today launched the Open Government Licence version 2.0 following consultation with users and other stakeholders in the open data community on how the Licence could be developed further to reflect new and emerging thinking on the licensing of public sector information."

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Open Access at Oxford » CC BY: what does it mean for scholarly articles?

Open Access at Oxford » CC BY: what does it mean for scholarly articles? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"A number of the enquiries to the Open Access Enquiries mailing list have asked us how the various types of Creative Commons licence specifically relate to scholarly articles. So, in this blog post we explain the rights that the CC BY licence grants to the reader (i.e. the licensee).

The RCUK policy currently mandates use of the Creative Commons ‘Attribution’ licence (CC BY) when an Article Processing Charge (APC) is levied. This licence allows others to distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the licensed work, including for commercial purposes, as long as the original author is credited. It is the most liberal of the six Creative Commons licences in comparison with, for example, CC BY-ND (no derivatives, no modifications) and CC BY-NC  (no commercial use)."

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Open access journal Horticulture Research to launch in 2014 | Nature Publishing Group

"Nature Publishing Group and Nanjing Agricultural University today announce the 2014 launch of Horticulture Research. The open access journal will launch on nature.com in January 2014, and will begin accepting submissions later in 2013. The new partnership was announced at the launch of the Macmillan Science & Education office in Shanghai this week, at an event at the Shanghai Science Hall.

Horticulture Research will publish original research articles and reviews and mini-reviews on novel discoveries focusing on all major horticultural crops, including fruits, vegetables, ornamental trees and flowers, herbs, and tea trees, both in preharvest and postharvest stages. The journal will primarily focus on basic and fundamental research with broad international and disciplinary interests. Its scope will cover genetics, breeding, “-omics” and evolution, origination and domestication horticultural crops, biotechnology, biochemistry, physiology, cellular and molecular biology, and environmental biology including interactions with other organisms."

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