Open Access News from the RSP team
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Open access on the conference circuit

"Having devoted a fair number of the words on this blog to open access over the past year and a half, I have found myself invited to an increasing number of meetings on the topic. Whether run by RLUK, the Royal Society or the LSE, these meetings have invariably been interesting, but they often seem to bring together many of the same people, mostly from libraries, funders, publishers and learned societies.

And when we get together at some point one or the other of us bemoans that fact that despite holding all these meetings, the word on OA and the policy developments in the wake of the Finch report, appear to be diffusing only slowly into the world of academia. I have little doubt that there are many librarians around the country working hard to bring their faculty members up to date — and the British Academy has recently done some sterling work. Nevertheless I sense that progress is on the slow side"

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Peter Suber - Google+ - Once more: There's seldom a trade-off between prestige and open acces

Peter Suber - Google+ - Once more: There's seldom a trade-off between prestige and open acces | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Times Higher Education just published an accurate story with a misleading headline: "Scholars favour prestige over access."
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/journals-ends-scholars-favour-prestige-over-access/2004383.article

Why is the story accurate? See the survey the story summarizes:  "UK Survey of Academics 2012," from Ithaka S+R, JISC, and RLUK, May 14, 2013. In particular see Figure 40 at p. 71. Here's how the authors of the survey interpret the results: "Three factors —all closely related to the prominence and reach of the publication— were rated as very important by more than 4 in 5 respondents: that the current issues of the journal are circulated widely, are well read by academics in their field, and have a high impact factor....And other factors —the journal’s accessibility in developing nations...and the journal making its articles freely available online so there is no cost to purchase or read them— were rated as important by less than a third of respondents overall."

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