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Open and Shut?: Danny Kingsley on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Danny Kingsley on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the seventh Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Danny Kingsley, Executive Officer of the Australian Open Access Support Group (AOASG), an organisation founded at the end of last year by six Australian universities in order to provide “a concerted and coordinated Australian voice in support of open access.”

 So far, 2013 has seen the OA scene dominated by events in the US and Europe. In the US, for instance, we have seen the publication of the OSTP Memorandum and the introduction of the FASTR bill in Congress. In Europe, the EU has committed to OA for its Horizon 2020 Framework Programme and the European Research Council has published its Guidelines for Open Access.  But it is the controversial OA Policy introduced on April 1st by Research Councils UK (RCUK) that has attracted the greatest attention (and opprobrium) within the OA movement, not least because of its stipulation that researchers favour Gold over Green OA, and its endorsement of Hybrid OA."
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OA monographs pose challenges for researchers and librarians - Research Information

"Last week’s Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference attracted several hundred delegates and a lively discussion, both at the event and online. Caren Milloy reports

For researchers and funders dismayed at the decline in monograph sales and the dwindling impact that this seems to suggest, open access (OA) publishing offers an exciting opportunity to make research available more widely. But, as delegates heard at early July’s Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences conference at the British Library, OA brings with it the need for fundamental new approaches from researchers, libraries and publishers."

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Nigel Vincent reflects on the Open Access monograph challenge

Nigel Vincent reflects on the Open Access monograph challenge | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Monographs are an intrinsically important mode of academic production and must not be sacrificed on the altar of open access, argues Nigel Vincent inDebating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. Book chapters are also a valuable and distinctive type of output which could find their visibility, and hence their viability, enhanced by an appropriate OA policy.

There are to date no agreed OA solutions in the domain of books. In developing OA models for books it is important that the peer review process as the guarantee of excellence is not compromised. Adoption of the untrammelled CC-BY licence is not appropriate for monographs and book chapters."

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Debating Open Access

Debating Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Twelve months after the publication of the Finch Report, during which the new RCUK policy on open access has been published, dissected, debated (including by committees in both Houses of Parliament), revised and implemented, it seems an apposite moment to step back and take stock.

 

A collection of essays published today by the British Academy under the title Debating Open Access presents one attempt to do just that. Given that the essays are published under the imprimatur of the British Academy there is an emphasis on the perspective from the humanities and social sciences — I am the only natural scientist among the eight contributors. This is healthy in my view, since the open access debate often appears to be dominated by scientific interests. That domination may simply be due to the fact that money talks — the natural sciences take the lion’s share of funding from the UK Research Councils — but, as Rita Gardner points out in her essay, around half of all UK academics are from the humanities and social sciences."

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"The book is a conversation". Really ?

"The book is a conversation". Really ? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Par­ti­cu­larly well orga­ni­zed and offe­ring a first-choice pro­gram, the confe­rence will remain in my memory as one of the most inter­es­ting that I was able to attend. Long confi­ned to very mar­gi­nal posi­tion of expe­ri­men­ta­tion, the open access publi­ca­tion of books in the huma­ni­ties is clearly beco­ming impor­tant today. It is true that the debate on open access to research results after the Finch report or the euro­pean recom­men­da­tion, was focu­sed until now not on huma­ni­ties mono­graphs, but rather on jour­nals, and firstly in science. Nevertheless, the great hall of the Confe­rence Cen­ter of the BL was packed and it reflec­ted the gro­wing inter­est in this issue in the aca­de­mic community. And from begin­ning to end of the confe­rence, we felt very clearly that the context was changing. Complementarity with the Ber­lin Confe­rence EPA in 2013 that I was also able to attend ear­lier this year is remar­kable: more tech­ni­cal and more focu­sed on eco­no­mic models, the Ber­lin confe­rence also sho­wed the same trend. In Lon­don, the conver­sa­tion was more theo­re­ti­cal, more intel­lec­tual, and was just as interesting."

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OASPA’s response to Request for Input – Finch Report: Survey of Progress, 14 June 2013 | Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association

"Background

We thank you for the opportunity to provide input to the Finch Report: Survey of Progress.

The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) represents the interests of Open Access publishers of journals and books, with the aim of expanding Open Access publishing while contributing to the development of standards and best practices in all areas of scholarly publishing. OASPA’s membership currently includes more than 60 full voting members, who range from independent OA journals that are run by small groups of researchers to many of the largest and most well-recognised publishers within the scholarly publishing industry."

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Implementing Open Access in the United Kingdom - Information Services and Use - Volume 33, Number 1 / 2013 - IOS Press

Implementing Open Access in the United Kingdom - Information Services and Use - Volume 33, Number 1 / 2013 - IOS Press | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Since July 2012, the UK has been undergoing an organized transition to open access. As of 01 April 2013, revised open access policies are coming into effect. Open access implementation requires new infrastructures for funding publishing. Universities as institutions increasingly will be central to managing article-processing charges, monitoring compliance and organizing deposit. This article reviews the implementation praxis between July 2012 and April 2013, including ongoing controversy and review, which has mainly focussed on embargo length."

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Open access: brought to book at last?

Open access: brought to book at last? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"A library-focused effort aims to take monographs off the analogue shelf. 

It would be easy to think of monographs as the scholarly output that the open-access movement forgot.

Mandates for free online access are popping up all around the world, but most relate exclusively to journal articles. A good example is Research Councils UK’s new open-access policy, launched in April and inspired by the Finch report published last year. That report dismissed monographs as too difficult a nut to crack in the absence of “further experimentation”.

The UK funding councils were slightly bolder. Their preliminary consultation on introducing an open-access mandate for the next research excellence framework, expected in 2020, included a question about whether a percentage of submitted monographs should be required to be open access."

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Open access. Why would an intermediary be involved? | SwetsBlog

"Open access presents some interesting challenges for both libraries and publishers. While the publisher side has been very well documented over the past few years, the impact open access will have on the rest of the content supply chain has been less well explored, particularly in terms of the potential role of an intermediary like Swets.

There are important and functional processes that a third-party service provider might help with related to the growth of open access publishing. In the case of increasing levels of gold open access papers, there will be an equal growth in the processing of author fees (article processing charges, or APCs), which will require high levels of administration and often brand new workflows for both libraries, publishers and funding organizations. In Swets’ case, our global support infrastructure could provide real value here by taking the time-consuming tasks out of the hands of the library so they can focus on the delivery of content and helping their authors and readers directly, providing information, training and support for publishing and discovering open access content."

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Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles

Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The principles underlying the Finch report – access, usability, quality, cost and sustainability – are broadly to be commended, writes Stuart M. Shieber in his chapter for Debating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. However, the report’s specific recommendations are short-term prescriptions that may lead to a limited increase in the amount of OA at a very high cost. In particular, it equates open access journals and hybrid journals, offering support to both of these models. However, the hybrid model entrenches the dysfunctional subscription model to the exclusion of the competitive and sustainable open access model. A preferable approach is to require authors to provide open access, but to be ecumenical about how that is achieved – through self-archiving or open access or hybrid journals – while providing support only for true open access journals"

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Open access on the conference circuit

"Having devoted a fair number of the words on this blog to open access over the past year and a half, I have found myself invited to an increasing number of meetings on the topic. Whether run by RLUK, the Royal Society or the LSE, these meetings have invariably been interesting, but they often seem to bring together many of the same people, mostly from libraries, funders, publishers and learned societies.

And when we get together at some point one or the other of us bemoans that fact that despite holding all these meetings, the word on OA and the policy developments in the wake of the Finch report, appear to be diffusing only slowly into the world of academia. I have little doubt that there are many librarians around the country working hard to bring their faculty members up to date — and the British Academy has recently done some sterling work. Nevertheless I sense that progress is on the slow side"

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Open and Shut?: Where are we, what still needs to be done? Stevan Harnad on the state of Open Access

Open and Shut?: Where are we, what still needs to be done? Stevan Harnad on the state of Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The interview below is the second in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA) and what the priorities ought to be going forward. It is with self-styled archivangelist Stevan Harnad, who is currently Canada Research Chair in cognitive science at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and professor of web science at the University of Southampton.

 In 1994 Harnad posted an online message calling on all researchers to archive their papers on the Internet in order to make them freely accessible to their peers — a strategy that later became known as Green Open Access, or self-archiving. The message — which Harnad headed “The Subversive Proposal” — initiated a series of online exchanges, many of which were subsequently collected and published as a book in 1995."
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Gold Open Access for Learned Societies? »

Gold Open Access for Learned Societies? » | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"These resources have been developed to help learned societies review options and take decisions about Gold Open Access publishing. You can navigate them by clicking on the relevant resource in the simple flowchart below. You can also find out more about the resources and the process:"

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Gold OA infrastructure

"The wide range of activities reported on the gold oa blog illustrate the priority now given to APC-funded gold OA by Government and other Establishment agencies in the UK, and the second-class status being given to repositories and other green OA developments by those same agencies. After many protests following the Finch Report, the role of repositories has been given greater recognition in the policies of RCUK and HEFCE, but this welcome recognition cannot disguise the fact that within the UK Establishment repositories are now not to be encouraged."

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