Open Access News from the RSP team
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Open Washing and Open Access Publishing

"Open Access stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse.1

As discussed earlier in this blog it is obvious that non-commercial and non-derivatives licenses do not comply with the requirements of the Budapest Open Access Initiative, the RCUK Open Access policy and the Berlin Declaration. All these licences have to be considered as totally incompatible with “Open Access” publishing.

If you look at the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and the new Directory of Open Access Monographs (DOAB), you will find most of the publications listed are using non-commercial and non-derivatives licenses which are not open in Terms of the Definition of “Open”. Even if the metadata in DOAJ and DOAB is licensed under an open license (CC-BY-SA), they do not list true “Open Access” publications as they promise. These two open access directories are just two of many examples of an ongoing threat of the idea of unrestricted access and reuse of academic publications."

 

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Before the law: open access, quality control and the future of peer review

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The Imaginary Journal of Poetic Economics: June 30, 2013 Dramatic Growth of Open Access

The Imaginary Journal of Poetic Economics: June 30, 2013 Dramatic Growth of Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Kudos to the Directory of Open Access Journals for an oustanding second quarter! In the past few months, DOAJ has added 912 titles for a total of 9,759 journals. That's a net growth rate of over 10 titles per day, up from the previous rate of over 3 titles per day. At this rate it won't be long before DOAJ exceeds the milestone of 10,000 journals. PubMedCentral growth continues to be very strong in spite of what looks like a bit of backsliding"

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Busting the top five myths about open access publishing

"Rather than lock up knowledge in costly journals, increasingly universities and governments are recognising that publicly funded research should be open to all.

This past year has seen new open access policies in the United Kingdom, the United States and from the European Commission. In Australia too, the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC) now both have open access policies.

Despite this activity, there remains a large amount of confusion about open access, with many misunderstandings persisting in the academic community and in universities"

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Open access journal hosting in City Research Online: Learning at City Journal

"We’ve recently been working with colleagues in City’s Learning Development Centre (LDC) and at EPrints Services to use our EPrints repository to host the LDC’s Learning at City Journal. The idea was to create a space within EPrints where electronic articles can be stored and served, with the layout, formatting, contextual information and branding you would expect from other e-journals you see on the web. The model for this was the University of Huddersfield’s Teaching in Lifelong Learning journal, which also uses a space within their larger EPrints repository."

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Free and easy to find

Free and easy to find | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"I can confirm for Richard Hoyle that the journal Theatre Notebook is run on such “old-fashioned lines that the editors give their time for nothing”, or at least nothing pecuniary (“Pipe-dream believers”, Opinion, 20 June). I would hope that most readers of Times Higher Education do not think this is “a waste of their time as academics”. Indeed, I expect that many readers can think of activities that they gladly undertake without recompense, including providing peer review, serving on national committees and speaking in local schools about university life. The Americans call it “service”, and it is an honourable tradition in academia."

 

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