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Open Access at Oxford » Open Access scenario 3: RCUK & CC BY – a ‘journey’ towards compliance

"In the 3rd in the series of Open Access scenarios we meet an EPSRC-funded Oxford University Professor working in the Department of Physics. The example demonstrates the decisions taken when the journal of choice did not offer the re-use license mandated by RCUK for compliance with their policy.

Professor Smith’s latest research project is funded by EPSRC. Since 1 April he has published one paper from the project, which he made available Open Access via the Green route i.e. deposited the accepted manuscript both in the subject repository, arXiv, and the University’s own repository, ORA.  This is what Professor Smith has been used to doing within his discipline."

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Before the law: open access, quality control and the future of peer review

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Open Access at Oxford » CC BY: what does it mean for scholarly articles?

Open Access at Oxford » CC BY: what does it mean for scholarly articles? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"A number of the enquiries to the Open Access Enquiries mailing list have asked us how the various types of Creative Commons licence specifically relate to scholarly articles. So, in this blog post we explain the rights that the CC BY licence grants to the reader (i.e. the licensee).

The RCUK policy currently mandates use of the Creative Commons ‘Attribution’ licence (CC BY) when an Article Processing Charge (APC) is levied. This licence allows others to distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the licensed work, including for commercial purposes, as long as the original author is credited. It is the most liberal of the six Creative Commons licences in comparison with, for example, CC BY-ND (no derivatives, no modifications) and CC BY-NC  (no commercial use)."

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Cambridge University Press Implements Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink® for Open Access Solution

"World’s Oldest Publishing House to Utilize RightsLink® for Open Access to Manage
Article Processing Charges (APCs) for Its Publications


Danvers, Mass. – Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC), a not-for-profit organization and leading provider of licensing and Open Access (OA) solutions, announces that Cambridge University Press has selected CCC’s RightsLink® for Open Access to manage Article Processing Charges (APCs) for its Open Access publications.


“RightsLink for Open Access enables scholarly and academic publishers to quickly and effectively execute APCs as well as page and color changes, submission fees and author reprints,” said Roy Kaufman, Managing Director, New Ventures, CCC. “By implementing RightsLink for Open Access for its publications, Cambridge University Press will not only save time and money, but also enable its authors to place orders with confidence and ease.”

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Academics: Ask not what Open Access can do for you, but what it can do for your disciplines

Academics: Ask not what Open Access can do for you, but what it can do for your disciplines | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Arguments for and against Open Access tend to focus on the needs of individual academics. Samuel Moore argues instead that advocates should spend more time emphasising how Open Access might benefit discipline-specific aims to encourage ownership of the movement from the ground up. Focusing on the specific needs of disciplines will help academic communities assess which of their publishing practices are beneficial and which merely persist out of tradition."

 

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The bottom line is that journals cost money

The bottom line is that journals cost money | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Open access is a utopian pipe dream, says Richard Hoyle. A recent issue of Times Higher Education featured a journal editor’s view of open access. The author, Gabriel Egan of De Montfort University, is all for it (“Green-eyed, no monster”, Opinion, 6 June). Indeed, he looks forward to one of the journals he edits, Theatre Notebook, becoming “an online-only, open-access offering”. Egan’s future is entirely digital. For this journal editor, however, this is an entirely implausible prospect."

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Research Fundermentals: An Introduction to Open Access

Research Fundermentals: An Introduction to Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"An Introduction to Open Access

  This week sees the introduction of the University's Open Access Policy. For those who are new to OA, I thought it would be useful to post a brief introduction to it.

Broad definition

Open Access (OA) is the practice of allowing academic outputs to be available to all, free of charge. Generally this applies to journal articles, but some effort is being made to apply OA to monographs and other outputs.

OA takes two forms:
'Green': in which an article is archived in a freely accessible online repository (such as KAR);'Gold:' in which an article is made freely available through a journal without subscription. Some publishers levy an 'article processing charge' (APC) for allowing an article to be made available OA."
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