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Open Access at Oxford » Open Access scenario 3: RCUK & CC BY – a ‘journey’ towards compliance

"In the 3rd in the series of Open Access scenarios we meet an EPSRC-funded Oxford University Professor working in the Department of Physics. The example demonstrates the decisions taken when the journal of choice did not offer the re-use license mandated by RCUK for compliance with their policy.

Professor Smith’s latest research project is funded by EPSRC. Since 1 April he has published one paper from the project, which he made available Open Access via the Green route i.e. deposited the accepted manuscript both in the subject repository, arXiv, and the University’s own repository, ORA.  This is what Professor Smith has been used to doing within his discipline."

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Open access. Why would an intermediary be involved? | SwetsBlog

"Open access presents some interesting challenges for both libraries and publishers. While the publisher side has been very well documented over the past few years, the impact open access will have on the rest of the content supply chain has been less well explored, particularly in terms of the potential role of an intermediary like Swets.

There are important and functional processes that a third-party service provider might help with related to the growth of open access publishing. In the case of increasing levels of gold open access papers, there will be an equal growth in the processing of author fees (article processing charges, or APCs), which will require high levels of administration and often brand new workflows for both libraries, publishers and funding organizations. In Swets’ case, our global support infrastructure could provide real value here by taking the time-consuming tasks out of the hands of the library so they can focus on the delivery of content and helping their authors and readers directly, providing information, training and support for publishing and discovering open access content."

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Chris Wickham considers open access in the UK and international environment

Chris Wickham considers open access in the UK and international environment | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"In his chapter for Debating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy, Chris Wickham considers the view from Humanities and Social Science both from the UK and international environment. Since HSS disciplines receive only a small percentage of RCUK funds, HEFCE’s policy on the admissibility of work for future REFs will be the most important determining factor. Other countries do not have RAE/REF equivalents to drive them down the Gold route; hence they are more likely to stay with Green and with longer embargo periods. Some leading international journals, particularly in the Humanities, have set their face against Gold OA and the introduction of APCs. UK scholars in HSS thus face a dilemma. If they publish in noncompliant international journals their work risks being ineligible for future REFs; if they don’t publish in these venues they risk falling off the international pace. A particularly intense variant of this dilemma threatens those whose professional community does not operate in English. Future REF criteria will need to reflect these discipline-specific circumstances."

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Before the law: open access, quality control and the future of peer review

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"The book is a conversation". Really ?

"The book is a conversation". Really ? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Par­ti­cu­larly well orga­ni­zed and offe­ring a first-choice pro­gram, the confe­rence will remain in my memory as one of the most inter­es­ting that I was able to attend. Long confi­ned to very mar­gi­nal posi­tion of expe­ri­men­ta­tion, the open access publi­ca­tion of books in the huma­ni­ties is clearly beco­ming impor­tant today. It is true that the debate on open access to research results after the Finch report or the euro­pean recom­men­da­tion, was focu­sed until now not on huma­ni­ties mono­graphs, but rather on jour­nals, and firstly in science. Nevertheless, the great hall of the Confe­rence Cen­ter of the BL was packed and it reflec­ted the gro­wing inter­est in this issue in the aca­de­mic community. And from begin­ning to end of the confe­rence, we felt very clearly that the context was changing. Complementarity with the Ber­lin Confe­rence EPA in 2013 that I was also able to attend ear­lier this year is remar­kable: more tech­ni­cal and more focu­sed on eco­no­mic models, the Ber­lin confe­rence also sho­wed the same trend. In Lon­don, the conver­sa­tion was more theo­re­ti­cal, more intel­lec­tual, and was just as interesting."

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Open Access at Oxford » CC BY: what does it mean for scholarly articles?

Open Access at Oxford » CC BY: what does it mean for scholarly articles? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"A number of the enquiries to the Open Access Enquiries mailing list have asked us how the various types of Creative Commons licence specifically relate to scholarly articles. So, in this blog post we explain the rights that the CC BY licence grants to the reader (i.e. the licensee).

The RCUK policy currently mandates use of the Creative Commons ‘Attribution’ licence (CC BY) when an Article Processing Charge (APC) is levied. This licence allows others to distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the licensed work, including for commercial purposes, as long as the original author is credited. It is the most liberal of the six Creative Commons licences in comparison with, for example, CC BY-ND (no derivatives, no modifications) and CC BY-NC  (no commercial use)."

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Join Us for a Complimentary Open Access Webinar

"Complimentary Webinar. A discussion about the latest developments in Open Access and scholarly publishing. In 2013, mandates for Open Access are driving dramatic changes in business models and workflow practices. Publishers are struggling with the details. And if OA isn’t complicated for you yet…it will be"

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Open Access - Keeping It Real

Open Access - Keeping It Real | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"As several speakers at SSP’s recent annual conference commented, Open Access is now a given. In the first six months of this year alone, we have seen a memorandum on OA from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), a request for information from the Higher Education Funding Council of England (HEFCE), the introduction of the Research Councils UK (RCUK) mandate, a position statement from Science Europe, and an Action Plan towards Open Access to Publications from the Global Research Council (GRC). Like rock and roll, OA is here to stay but, as with rock and roll, it doesn’t always live up to its own hype"

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Open and Shut?: Heather Joseph on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Open and Shut?: Heather Joseph on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done? | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"This is the fourth Q&A in a series exploring the current state of Open Access (OA). On this occasion the questions are answered by Heather Joseph.

 A former journal publisher, Joseph has in her time worked for both Elsevier and the American Society for Cell Biology (ACSB). In 2005, however, she changed direction and became Executive Director for the Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), an alliance of academic and research libraries created in 1998 by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). SPARC’s original mission was to “use libraries’ buying power to nurture the creation of high-quality, low-priced publication outlets for peer-reviewed scientific, technical, and medical research.”
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Academics: Ask not what Open Access can do for you, but what it can do for your disciplines

Academics: Ask not what Open Access can do for you, but what it can do for your disciplines | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Arguments for and against Open Access tend to focus on the needs of individual academics. Samuel Moore argues instead that advocates should spend more time emphasising how Open Access might benefit discipline-specific aims to encourage ownership of the movement from the ground up. Focusing on the specific needs of disciplines will help academic communities assess which of their publishing practices are beneficial and which merely persist out of tradition."

 

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Nigel Vincent reflects on the Open Access monograph challenge

Nigel Vincent reflects on the Open Access monograph challenge | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Monographs are an intrinsically important mode of academic production and must not be sacrificed on the altar of open access, argues Nigel Vincent inDebating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. Book chapters are also a valuable and distinctive type of output which could find their visibility, and hence their viability, enhanced by an appropriate OA policy.

There are to date no agreed OA solutions in the domain of books. In developing OA models for books it is important that the peer review process as the guarantee of excellence is not compromised. Adoption of the untrammelled CC-BY licence is not appropriate for monographs and book chapters."

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Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles

Stuart M. Shieber discusses ecumenical open access and the Finch report principles | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"The principles underlying the Finch report – access, usability, quality, cost and sustainability – are broadly to be commended, writes Stuart M. Shieber in his chapter for Debating Open Access, a new publication from the British Academy. However, the report’s specific recommendations are short-term prescriptions that may lead to a limited increase in the amount of OA at a very high cost. In particular, it equates open access journals and hybrid journals, offering support to both of these models. However, the hybrid model entrenches the dysfunctional subscription model to the exclusion of the competitive and sustainable open access model. A preferable approach is to require authors to provide open access, but to be ecumenical about how that is achieved – through self-archiving or open access or hybrid journals – while providing support only for true open access journals"

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Open access journal hosting in City Research Online: Learning at City Journal

"We’ve recently been working with colleagues in City’s Learning Development Centre (LDC) and at EPrints Services to use our EPrints repository to host the LDC’s Learning at City Journal. The idea was to create a space within EPrints where electronic articles can be stored and served, with the layout, formatting, contextual information and branding you would expect from other e-journals you see on the web. The model for this was the University of Huddersfield’s Teaching in Lifelong Learning journal, which also uses a space within their larger EPrints repository."

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The bottom line is that journals cost money

The bottom line is that journals cost money | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"Open access is a utopian pipe dream, says Richard Hoyle. A recent issue of Times Higher Education featured a journal editor’s view of open access. The author, Gabriel Egan of De Montfort University, is all for it (“Green-eyed, no monster”, Opinion, 6 June). Indeed, he looks forward to one of the journals he edits, Theatre Notebook, becoming “an online-only, open-access offering”. Egan’s future is entirely digital. For this journal editor, however, this is an entirely implausible prospect."

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Research Fundermentals: An Introduction to Open Access

Research Fundermentals: An Introduction to Open Access | Open Access News from the RSP team | Scoop.it

"An Introduction to Open Access

  This week sees the introduction of the University's Open Access Policy. For those who are new to OA, I thought it would be useful to post a brief introduction to it.

Broad definition

Open Access (OA) is the practice of allowing academic outputs to be available to all, free of charge. Generally this applies to journal articles, but some effort is being made to apply OA to monographs and other outputs.

OA takes two forms:
'Green': in which an article is archived in a freely accessible online repository (such as KAR);'Gold:' in which an article is made freely available through a journal without subscription. Some publishers levy an 'article processing charge' (APC) for allowing an article to be made available OA."
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Cambridge University Press Implements Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink® for Open Access Solution

"World’s Oldest Publishing House to Utilize RightsLink® for Open Access to Manage
Article Processing Charges (APCs) for Its Publications


Danvers, Mass. – Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC), a not-for-profit organization and leading provider of licensing and Open Access (OA) solutions, announces that Cambridge University Press has selected CCC’s RightsLink® for Open Access to manage Article Processing Charges (APCs) for its Open Access publications.


“RightsLink for Open Access enables scholarly and academic publishers to quickly and effectively execute APCs as well as page and color changes, submission fees and author reprints,” said Roy Kaufman, Managing Director, New Ventures, CCC. “By implementing RightsLink for Open Access for its publications, Cambridge University Press will not only save time and money, but also enable its authors to place orders with confidence and ease.”

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