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New mHealth App May Detect Elevated Unhealthy Stress

New mHealth App May Detect Elevated Unhealthy Stress | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
A new mHealth app aims to do what some consider to be the impossible – mitigate the stress in our lives. That’s the claim behind the makers of the new app

Via Alex Butler
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For a comparison of mental health apps and online mental health programs see www.telementalhealthcomparisons.com

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Lifelogging App Knows When You’re Depressed, Stressed or Lonely

Lifelogging App Knows When You’re Depressed, Stressed or Lonely | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
Motion, audio, and location data harvested from a smartphone can be analyzed to accurately predict stress or depression.

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Report: Google principles roadmap for mental health app building

Report: Google principles roadmap for mental health app building | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
Evidence-based mobile mental health technologies could boost patient self-care and reduce the increasing demand for one-on-one psychological intervention, but such mHealth tools would do well to adhere to specific development guidelines, according to a new research study.

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Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative partners with health app to recruit participants | mobihealthnews

Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative partners with health app to recruit participants | mobihealthnews | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of North Carolina have partnered with health app maker Recovery Record to recruit more participants for a clinical trial to study how genes are connected to anorexia, according to a report from MedCityNews. The researchers head up the University’s Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative (ANGI).


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Is That App FDA Approved? Mobile Health Tech Falls Into Gray Area

Is That App FDA Approved? Mobile Health Tech Falls Into Gray Area | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

Personal health is becoming increasingly mobile, and there are now thousands of apps aiming to address everything from lifestyle issues to chronic diseases. But can you trust these apps the same way you trust your prescribed drugs and medical devices?

 

Medical devices are generally regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and although the FDA reviews some apps, experts say the agency's power and efforts aren't nearly enough to cover the 97,000 and counting health apps out there that are transforming consumer health.


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Joel Finkle's curator insight, August 1, 2014 9:22 AM

The issue of regulated apps has reached the clickbait sites. Its lack of depth will surprise you!

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Mobile tech reshaping the health sector

Mobile tech reshaping the health sector | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

Your smartphone is not only your best friend, it's also become your personal trainer, coach, medical lab and maybe even your doctor.

 

"Digital health" has become a key focus for the technology industry, from modest startups' focus on apps to the biggest companies in the sector seeking to find ways to address key issues of health and wellness.

 

Apps that measure heart rate, blood pressure, glucose and other bodily functions are multiplying, while Google, Apple and Samsung have launched platforms that make it easier to integrate medical and health services.

 

"We've gotten to a point where with sensors either in the phone or wearables gather information that we couldn't do in the past without going to a medical center," says Gerry Purdy, analyst at Compass Intelligence.

 

"You can do the heart rate, mobile EKGs (electrocardiograms). Costs are coming down, and these sensors are becoming more socially acceptable."

 

The consultancy Rock Health estimates 143 digital health companies raised $2.3 billion in the first six months of 2014, already topping last year's amount.

 

Recent studies suggest that people who use connected devices to monitor health and fitness often do a better job of managing and preventing health problems.

 

A study led by the Center for Connected Health found that people who use mobile devices did a better job of lowering dangerous blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

 

A separate study published in the July 2014 issue of Health Affairs found that data collected by devices is not only useful for patients but can help doctors find better treatments.

 

"When linked to the rest of the available electronic data, patient-generated health data completes the big data picture of real people's needs, life beyond the health care system," said Amy Abernethy, a Duke University professor of medicine lead author of the study.

 

Some firms have even more ambitious plans for health technology.

 

Google, for example, is developing a connecting contract lens which can help monitor diabetics and has set up a new company called Calico to focus on health and well-being, hinting at cooperation with rivals such as Apple. And IBM is using its Watson supercomputer for medical purposes including finding the right cancer treatment.

 

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-07-mobile-tech-reshaping-health-sector.html#jCp

 


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Stanford to offer free online training in mobile health

Stanford to offer free online training in mobile health | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

Ever wanted to learn from some of the world’s experts on mobile devices and health technology? And apply it towards solving international health issues? Physicians from Stanford University will re-offer their online course, Mobile Health Without Borders, addressing these topics. Their course is available to the public at no charge.


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In rural SC, telepsychiatry cuts wait times for mental health exams from 4 days to 10 hours

In rural SC, telepsychiatry cuts wait times for mental health exams from 4 days to 10 hours | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
South Carolina researchers say a project employing telemedicine psychiatric exams in rural hospitals has cut the average cost by $1,400 per consult.
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As Online Counseling Gains Popularity, Confidentiality Concerns Arise - TWC News

As Online Counseling Gains Popularity, Confidentiality Concerns Arise - TWC News | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
As Online Counseling Gains Popularity, Confidentiality Concerns Arise
TWC News
WILMINGTON -- The ease of chatting online with a counselor is gaining popularity. But is this convenient form of counseling very confidential for clients?
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More technology available for #onlinetherapy at www.telementahealthcomparisons.com

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Tele-psychiatry - HD3D Teleconferencing

Dr Ramon Mocellin, Dr Richard Collmann, Dr Ravi Baht and Chris Myers demonstrating a successful 3D videoconference psychiatric simulation between Melbourne and Shepperton.
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In rural SC, telepsychiatry cuts wait times for mental health exams from 4 days to 10 hours

In rural SC, telepsychiatry cuts wait times for mental health exams from 4 days to 10 hours | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
South Carolina researchers say a project employing telemedicine psychiatric exams in rural hospitals has cut the average cost by $1,400 per consult.
Jay Ostrowski's insight:

See www.telementalhealthcomparisons.com for platforms and networks for online #therapists and #counselors.

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Google Smart Contact Lens Focuses On Healthcare Billions

Google Smart Contact Lens Focuses On Healthcare Billions | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

Google is developing a smart contact lens, with pharmaceutical giant Novartis, to help patients manage diabetes – in one of a number of moves focused squarely on billions of dollars of  potential revenue available across the total digital healthcare market.

 

As technology moves further into treatment with remote consultations, monitoring and operations, robotic treatments, and advanced digital diagnosis, Google has seen the opportunity to apply its own eyewear technology (up until now limited as glasses called Google Glass) to the healthcare field.

 

Google’s 3D mobile technology and its offering around health record digitization form potential other strands of its expansion in the health market. Last month, it released the Google Fit platform to track exercise and sleep, among other health factors – but it is far from alone, as Apple and Samsung offer similar systems in that area.

 

 

 

Today, under a new development and licensing deal between Google and the Alcon eyewear division at Novartis, the two companies said they will create a smart contact lens that contains a low power microchip and an almost invisible, hair-thin electronic circuit. The lens can measure diabetics’ blood sugar levels directly from tear fluid on the surface of the eyeball. The system sends data to a mobile device to keep the individual informed.

 

Google co-founder Sergey Brin said  the company wanted to use “the latest technology in ‘minituarisation’ of electronics” in order to improve people’s “quality of life”.

 

more at http://www.forbes.com/sites/leoking/2014/07/15/google-smart-contact-lens-focuses-on-healthcare-billions/

 

 

 


Via nrip
Jay Ostrowski's insight:

This is not directly related to mental health-yet, but shows how health technology is rapidly expanding.

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Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices | mobihealthnews

Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices | mobihealthnews | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

Eighty percent of smartphone users are interested in using their smartphones to interact with health care providers, according to a FICO survey of 2,239 adult smartphone users from the UK, Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, and the United States.

The survey analyzed how consumers prefer to interact with health care providers on mobile devices, online and in-person.


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Helen Adams's curator insight, July 3, 2014 4:22 AM

Now that depends on what they mean by "interact", are they meaning consultation with their HCP or accessing test results and repeat prescriptions.

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Use of Mobile Phone Text Message Reminders in Health Care Services - #study

Use of Mobile Phone Text Message Reminders in Health Care Services - #study | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

Background: Mobile text messages are a widely recognized communication method in societies, as the global penetration of the technology approaches 100% worldwide. Systematic knowledge is still lacking on how the mobile telephone text messaging (short message service, SMS) has been used in health care services.

 

Objective: This study aims to review the literature on the use of mobile phone text message reminders in health care.

 

 

Conclusions: We can conclude that although SMS reminders are used with different patient groups in health care, SMS is less systematically studied with randomized controlled trial study design. Although the amount of evidence for SMS application recommendations is still limited, having 77% (46/60) of the studies showing improved outcomes may indicate its use in health care settings. However, more well-conducted SMS studies are still needed.

 

  more at : http://www.jmir.org/2014/10/e222/ ;
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Bad Posture Makes You Sad and Afraid, Study Finds

Bad Posture Makes You Sad and Afraid, Study Finds | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
Straighter posture is linked to better mood and self-esteem

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Randy Bauer's curator insight, September 18, 2014 8:38 PM

There is a mind and body connection related to our posture. 

"Walk with Your chest up and shoulders back. This helps to balance your head position, and reduce fatigue and strain."

And you most certainly look in control and confident.

Scott Langston's curator insight, September 18, 2014 8:51 PM

Sit and straight - and now scientific evidence that it's not just about backache!

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The Mayo Clinic Will Help Launch iPhone 6

The Mayo Clinic Will Help Launch iPhone 6 | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
The healthcare provider will be promoting using smartphones (and maybe smartwatches) to monitor your health.

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Helen Adams's curator insight, September 15, 2014 5:01 AM

Partnering with the Mayo clinic is certainly a smart move

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The latest iOS 8 beta update gets serious about health

The latest iOS 8 beta update gets serious about health | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

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Apple’s getting serious about health, and the latest update to iOS 8’s developer beta is beefing up its health-related capabilities.

Apple released iOS 8 beta 5 today, and among the many updates, it slipped in support for spirometry data, which is a test that helps with the diagnosis of certain lung conditions by measuring the amount or speed of air a person a person inhales or exhales. (This comes alongside casual consumer capabilities, such as fitness tracking.)


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Hupertan's comment, August 18, 2014 5:36 PM
Apple and its health kit !
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Doctor Dictum: Beauty of mHealth is in Behavior Change

Doctor Dictum: Beauty of mHealth is in Behavior Change | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
Dr. Samir Damani, a cardiologist at Scripps Health and a physician-entrepreneur, believes there is much value in the proliferation of digital and mobile health

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Mobile Technologies Could Revolutionize Health Care If It Can Overcome Challenges | MIT Technology Review

Mobile Technologies Could Revolutionize Health Care If It Can Overcome Challenges | MIT Technology Review | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it

Among technologists, mobile health is thriving. Since the start of 2013, more than $750 million in venture capital has been invested in companies that do everything from turn your smartphone into a blood pressure gauge to snapping medical–quality images of the inner ear. Apple, Qualcomm, Microsoft, and other corporate giants are creating mobile health products and investing in startups. 


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In rural SC, telepsychiatry cuts wait times for mental health exams from 4 days to 10 hours

In rural SC, telepsychiatry cuts wait times for mental health exams from 4 days to 10 hours | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
South Carolina researchers say a project employing telemedicine psychiatric exams in rural hospitals has cut the average cost by $1,400 per consult.
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Conferences- Essentials Conference - National Association of Social Workers NC Chapter

Conferences- Essentials Conference - National Association of Social Workers NC Chapter | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
Want to add #teletherapy to your #social work practice? Join us! http://t.co/VggvehQWru
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Elderly succeed with internet depression treatment - Australian Ageing Agenda

Elderly succeed with internet depression treatment - Australian Ageing Agenda | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
Age is not a barrier to success in treating depression and anxiety online, says a leading researcher in the field, whose multiple studies have found four in every five participants improve plus older people have higher course completion rates
Jay Ostrowski's insight:

The comparison site www.telementalhealthcomparisons.com has more online #mentalhealth programs like this one.

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Provoking symptoms to relieve symptoms: A randomized controlled dismantling study of exposure therapy in irritable bowel syndrome

An internet-delivered cognitive behavioral treatment (ICBT) based on systematic exposure exercises has previously shown beneficial effects for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Exposure exercises may be perceived as difficult for patients to perform because of the elicited short-term distress and clinicians may be reluctant to use these interventions. The aim of this study was to compare ICBT with the same protocol without systematic exposure (ICBT-WE) to assess if exposure had any incremental value. This randomized controlled dismantling study included 309 participants diagnosed with IBS. The treatment interventions lasted for 10 weeks and included online therapist contact. ICBT-WE comprised mindfulness, work with life values, acceptance, and encouraged reduced avoidance behaviors, while ICBT also included systematic exposure to IBS symptoms and related situations. Severity of IBS symptoms was measured with the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale – IBS version (GSRS-IBS). The between-group Cohen's d on GSRS-IBS was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.23–0.70) at post-treatment and 0.48 (95% CI: 0.20–0.76) at 6-month follow-up, favoring ICBT. We conclude that the systematic exposure included in the ICBT protocol has incremental effects over the other components in the protocol. This study provides evidence for the utility of exposure exercises in psychological treatments for IBS.


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Dr James Hawkins's curator insight, April 29, 2014 4:17 AM

In general, interventions involving some components of a broad intervention often perform as well as the original full intervention itself.  This background finding makes the results of this study still more interesting.  The authors highlight: • Few psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) include exposure. • We investigated the effect of exposure exercises for IBS using a dismantling design. • Exposure had an incremental effect compared to mindfulness and values work. • Psychological treatments for IBS may benefit from including exposure exercises.

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Mental-health monitoring goes mobile

Mental-health monitoring goes mobile | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
Behavioral health analytics startup Ginger.io sees smartphones as 'automated diaries' containing valuable insight into the mental well-being of people with mental illnesses.

Via Alex Butler
Jay Ostrowski's insight:

More apps like this at www.telementalhealthcomparisons.com.

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New mHealth App May Detect Elevated Unhealthy Stress

New mHealth App May Detect Elevated Unhealthy Stress | Online Therapy Guide | Scoop.it
A new mHealth app aims to do what some consider to be the impossible – mitigate the stress in our lives. That’s the claim behind the makers of the new app

Via Alex Butler
Jay Ostrowski's insight:

For a comparison of mental health apps and online mental health programs see www.telementalhealthcomparisons.com

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