Social Media Impact on relationships
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Social Media Impact on  relationships
How social media and social networks affect our relationships
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Facebook Can Clarify the Status of a Relationship - Room for Debate

Facebook Can Clarify the Status of a Relationship - Room for Debate | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
As social scientists observe the passing of “going steady” and the exchanging of class rings, it can be argued that Facebook offers couples a way to clarify their relationships. By Gretchen Kelmer.
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Kim & Kat's curator insight, June 18, 2015 2:11 PM

Another article Katerina Dimitriou shared is entitled “Facebook Can Clarify the Status of a Relationship - Room for Debate.” The article argues that relationships have become so ambiguous that Facebook can easily clear it up through someone’s status. With this social media site, individuals can become “Facebook official,” thus showing those who can view the status that the relationship is indeed official.

 

Although this article states that “Facebook offers today’s couples a valuable tool for replacing ambiguity with clarity,” I personally feel that a social media site should not define a relationship. Individuals need to communicate better to the point where being “Facebook official” makes the relationship official. This decision needs to be made together at a personal level.

 

At the other end of the spectrum, couples should not use Facebook as a means of ending their relationships, by simply changing their status to single. When I was 16, my boyfriend of 4 months “broke up with me” by changing his status on Facebook to single. We weren’t able to talk about what happened, and it made school very awkward since he was in my class. Needless to say, that hasn’t happen again, but it should have never happened in the first place. He should’ve been able to end the relationship in person and give me closure. Younger couples these days tend to take advantage of social media sites and texting to end their relationships than facing the other individual in person. I personally believe this needs to change because communication is key in any relationship, even in the relationship one has with an ex.

 

-Kimberly Lintag

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Study reveals 'smaller is smarter' in social networks | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

Study reveals 'smaller is smarter' in social networks | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

Study reveals 'smaller is smarter' in social networks - The strength of weak-nodes

The problem of identifying the minimal set of influential nodes in complex networks for maximizing viral marketing in social media, optimizing immunization campaigns and protecting networks under attack is one of the most studied problems in network science

 

Morone and Makse set about to solve the problem by applying what they described as "rigorous theoretical solutions and systematic benchmarking." They also proposed a scalable algorithm, called Collective Influence algorithm, that they believe beats all the competing methods in massively large-scale social networks like Twitter and Facebook with more than 100 million usersTheir theory shows that top influencers are highly counterintuitive: weakly connected people strategically surrounded by hierarchical coronas of hubs are the most powerful influencers.

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Callisto to Offer New Reporting System for Survivors of Sexual Assault

Callisto to Offer New Reporting System for Survivors of Sexual Assault | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
The project, in development by a nonprofit organization, will use technology to bridge gaps in existing procedures. But some skeptics worry about protecting the accused.The system, called Callisto and developed by Sexual Health Innovations, is intended to simplify the reporting process for students. People using Callisto will be presented with information about the processes for filing a report with their college and with local law-enforcement agencies.But if a student decides not to report an assault, he or she will be able instead to record on Callisto as much or as little information as desired, save the information, and return to it at any point in the futureBut Ms. Lazarov says the system’s use of technology will be one of its greatest strengths. Some survivors are afraid to talk about an assault or don’t know what their resources are, she says, and Callisto will help to reach those people..
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Why social media really can't replace your friends: True friendship requires ... - Daily Mail

Why social media really can't replace your friends: True friendship requires ... - Daily Mail | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

A new study has found that it takes, on average, eight calls and two meetings a month for a friend to be considered close. Friendships must also last three years for best friend status to be conferred.

Spending quality time together, being there for key life experiences and doing thoughtful things such as giving presents on special occasions are the things that really matter to most.'


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2842105

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Use Social Media In The Fight Against Communicable Diseases

Use Social Media In The Fight Against Communicable Diseases | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
If there were a way to use existing technology to help identify people potentially exposed to Ebola (or any communicable disease like SARS or the flu) would..
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Kids and Socializing Online | OnGuard Online

Kids and Socializing Online | OnGuard Online | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
Tips for parents whose teens use social networks

Social networking sites, chat rooms, virtual worlds, and blogs are how teens and tweens socialize online; it's important to help your child learn how to navigate these spaces safely. Among the pitfalls that come with online socializing are sharing too much information or posting comments, photos, or videos that can damage a reputation or hurt someone's feelings.

Applying real-world judgment can help minimize those risks.

Remind Kids That Online Actions Have ConsequencesTell Kids to Limit What They ShareEncourage Online MannersLimit Access to Your Kids’ ProfilesTalk to Kids About What They’re Doing Online
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Teen 'Sexting' Often Precedes Actual Sex, Study Finds - US News

Teen 'Sexting' Often Precedes Actual Sex, Study Finds - US News | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
Researcher says don't throw out the phone, do discuss safe behavior

Finkelhor said, U.S. teens these days are "much more responsible" about sex compared with decades past. Teen pregnancy has fallen sharply since the 1990s, and fewer teenagers say they've had multiple sex partners, Finkelhor noted.

"All of this is happening during the sexting era," he said. "So it's unlikely that sexting is contributing to increased sexual activity.

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Keeping the Back Burner Warm with Technology - | - Science of Relationships

Keeping the Back Burner Warm with Technology - | - Science of Relationships | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

With the pervasiveness of social media and mobile devices comes the potential to communicate with hundreds or thousands of people with just a few taps or clicks. Of course, we are connected to lots of different types of people, including family, friends, coworkers, and random people you have a faint recollection of from high school who friended you on Facebook. We also have very different reasons for communicating with particular people in our social circles. New research1 suggests that one motivation for communicating on Facebook (and other social media sites) is to keep some of our connections on the “back burner” as potential future romantic partners.

do people who are currently in exclusive romantic relationships also keep potential mates on the back burner? The research team defined back burners as: 

people we are romantically and/or sexual interested in, who we are not currently involved with, and with whom we keep in contact in the possibility that we might someday connect romantically and/or sexually. People can have back burners even if they are already in a romantic relationship with someone else. Also, a former romantic and/or sexual partner can still count as a back burner so long as we still desire a romantic and/or sexual connection with them.” 

On average, both men and women reported having about 350 contacts (e.g., total Facebook friends), but from those contacts men reported having more than twice as many back burners than women (8.4 to 3.8).

People in relationships reported communicating with just as many back burners as single people. Of these, those in romantic relationships reported already having platonic conversations with 2.7 people, and romantic/sexual conversations with 1.8 people. That’s right: college students in relationships report having romantic/sexual conversations with, on average, nearly two people other than their current romantic partner.

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Kim & Kat's curator insight, June 25, 2015 4:23 PM

This article discusses an interesting topic: “back burners”, which are described as people we are romantically/sexually interested in. We aren't currently involved with them, but we see the potential in them and keep in contact since there is that possibility. With social media allowing us to be friends with thousands of people if we so choose, we are constantly connected with more people that could become our back burners. Studies showed that whether or not a person was in a relationship did not necessarily affect the number of back burners one had – I found this quite troubling. As someone who is 100% devoted to who I am with, I can't imagine having “back ups”. I wonder how close you have to be with someone for them to be considered a back burner, and I actually wonder if this could qualify as emotional cheating. This also makes me wonder about the 'To Catch a Cheater' article; do any of the apps make it easier to see your significant other's back burners?

 

Not every aspect of media technology is positive towards our relationships, and to me, this concept definitely shows a negative side. We are able to stay in contact with people that we perhaps should not be in contact with out of respect for our significant others.

 

Kathryn Opp

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Psychologists Address How Social Media Can Affect Intimate Conversations And ... - KpopStarz

Psychologists Address How Social Media Can Affect Intimate Conversations And ... - KpopStarz | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

there's definitely been some public concern that social media is not the place for anything beyond surface level discussion between couples. Nevertheless, a new study suggests that social media may not be such a bad place to ease tension after a fight.

According to Psychology Today, "Research has shown that, in intimate relationships, social media can be quite helpful. The core of this is due to the asynchronous nature of online communication. Subjects in this study reported that the time to think or cool off when they are angry is very important. Once they had enough time to think, they could use social media, email, or text messages to send apologies, "I love you" messages, or to test the waters with the other person."The study in question is also reported to have shown that social media interaction can ease anxiety when talking about difficult subjects.

Author Robert Weiss, who has also conducted research on how technology is shaping humanity, states, "Despite the sometimes legitimate reservations many people have about digital dating (mostly that it is still very easy to lie about things like education, financial well being, and current relationship status), it appears that technology used for romantic purposes, especially when technology-driven romantic interaction is paired with real-world dates, can indeed propel relationships forward."

There are some reservations however. The first is that misunderstandings can come from the lack of non-verbal cues. Moreover, there's also no evidence that supports the full blown replacement of physical contact with digital contact can sustain a healthy relationship

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Kim & Kat's curator insight, June 25, 2015 4:23 PM

This article focuses on fighting in relationships. Similar to the previous topic, 'Social Networks Kill "Real" Relationships, this article believes that social media can actually be beneficial. A study was done and shows that social media can actually be a really useful tool when conflicts arise in relationships. People are able to take time when they type out their responses, cool off, and send apology messages to their significant other. I really loved this article, because I'm someone that tends to struggle with articulating myself in stressful situations. If I'm having a disagreement with my husband while he isn't home, I have time to type out a text that can get my message across since I have that extra time to think about what I'm saying. On the other hand, sometimes getting your tone across can be difficult; the other person might read your message and think you're angry, being sarcastic, etc. and that may not be the case at all. As with any face-to-face argument, it's important to be careful in how you word things via social media.

 

Kathryn Opp

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The 'Spiral of Silence': How social media encourages self-censorship online - The Independent

The 'Spiral of Silence': How social media encourages self-censorship online - The Independent | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

Although Facebook and Twitter might be the perfect medium for spreading single-soundbite messages (think #icebucketchallenge) a new report from the Pew Research Center shows that social media actually stifles discussion on important issues.

Perhaps more alarmingly, the researchers found that social media use also had a knock-on effect on real-life conversations: frequent Facebook and Twitter users were less likely to share their opinions even in face-to-face discusions when they felt their online friends hadn’t agreed with their view point.

The researchers found far from encouraging debate, social media nurtured a phenomenon known as the ‘spiral of silence’ – a term coined in the mid-70s to describe how individuals supress their own views if they believe they differ from those of family, friends and work colleagues.

Although the hubbub of comment threads and Twitter timelines might seem to contain a wide variety of opinion, the researchers suggest that internet users tend to clump together with like-minded individuals

However, the report found that if individuals felt that their Facebook friends were more likely to agree with their position on a given issue they were 1.91 times more likely to join in a conversation about it, with this tendency increasing among those who held strong opinions – they were 2.4 times more likely to join in conversations online.

The suggestion is that these mechanisms accumulate; snowballing to create an atmosphere online where the most fervently held opinions are the most likely to be aired, while individuals with moderate or dissenting views hang back on the sidelines.

“An informed citizenry depends on people’s exposure to information on important political issues and on their willingness to discuss these issues with those around them,” concluded the researchers. But what will happen - and what has happened - to our politics, if we are unwilling to discuss them?

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Pros and Cons of Online Dating

Pros and Cons of Online Dating | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
When and how to date online.

Experiences with online dating tend to be mixed. Some people have excellent experiences with online dating that end in satisfying relationships. Others have stories filled with confusion and frustration. Thus, much like any other way to date, meeting someone online has both benefits and drawbacks.

So, how does someone date online successfully? As it turns out, a simple analysis of the pros and cons of online dating can help out a great deal. Fortunately, the psychological research just happens to have such an analysis.

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New social media study investigates relationships among Facebook use, narcissism and empathy

New social media study investigates relationships among Facebook use, narcissism and empathy | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
A new study investigated the relationship among adult Facebook users and found that some Facebook features are linked to selfishness and some Facebook activities may encourage empathy.

Alloway and her research team conducted a study, recently published in Social Networking, of more than 400 individuals and asked them a range of questions about their Facebook behaviors, including how many hours per day they spent on Facebook, and the number of times they updated their status. They also asked participants to rate their profile picture: were they physically attractive, cool, glamorous and fashionable.

Participants in the study, the bulk single, used Facebook an average of two hours per day and had approximately 500 friends for both males and females. The majority -- 89.5 percent -- reported they were included in their profile photo.

To assess how narcissistic they were, participants were given a standard narcissism questionnaire, where they had to choose between statements that best described them. For example, they had to decide between "I like to be the center of attention" or "I prefer to blend in with the crowd."

The study revealed only one Facebook behavior accurately predicted narcissism levels: user profile picture ratings. For males, only their profile picture ratings were a predictor of narcissism. For the females, both their profile picture ratings and their status update frequency predicted their narcissism.

 

The study's conclusion found that some Facebook activities, such as chatting, encourage some aspects of empathy. Although the photo feature was linked to narcissism, the overall pattern of findings suggests that social media is primarily a tool for staying connected than for self-promotion.

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A New Understanding of Friendships in Space: Complex Networks Meet Twitter

Studies on friendships in online social networks involving geographic distance have so far relied on the city location provided in users' profiles. Consequently, most of the research on friendships have provided accuracy at the city level, at best, to designate a user's location. This study analyzes a Twitter dataset because it provides the exact geographic distance between corresponding users. We start by introducing a strong definition of "friend" on Twitter (i.e., a definition of bidirectional friendship), requiring bidirectional communication. Next, we utilize geo-tagged mentions delivered by users to determine their locations, where "@username" is contained anywhere in the body of tweets. To provide analysis results, we first introduce a friend counting algorithm. From the fact that Twitter users are likely to post consecutive tweets in the static mode, we also introduce a two-stage distance estimation algorithm. As the first of our main contributions, we verify that the number of friends of a particular Twitter user follows a well-known power-law distribution (i.e., a Zipf's distribution or a Pareto distribution). Our study also provides the following newly-discovered friendship degree related to the issue of space: The number of friends according to distance follows a double power-law (i.e., a double Pareto law) distribution, indicating that the probability of befriending a particular Twitter user is significantly reduced beyond a certain geographic distance between users, termed the separation point. Our analysis provides concrete evidence that Twitter can be a useful platform for assigning a more accurate scalar value to the degree of friendship between two users.

Via Ashish Umre
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Facebook illusion TRICKS you into thinking things are popular

Facebook illusion TRICKS you into thinking things are popular | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
Computer scientists at the University of Southern California have discovered a ‘majority illusion’ which could explain why some videos go viral and others are not shared (a stock image is shown).

 If just 3 of the people in the network (the ones with a large number of connections) share something, to other people on the network it can suddenly seem like everybody is seeing and talking about it.

Two versions of this setup are shown above. In the left-hand example, the uncolored nodes see more than half of their neighbors as colored. In the right-hand example, this is not true for any of the uncolored nodes. But here’s the thing: the structure of the network is the same in both cases. The only thing that changes is the nodes that are colored.   This is the majority illusion—the local impression that a specific attribute is common when the global truth is entirely different.

But structure of networks matters:

In Disassortative networks, well-connected nodes join to a much larger number of less-well-connected nodes.  By contrast, in Assortative networks well-connected nodes tend to join to other well-connected nodes, as in many social networks. some network structures are more susceptible than others to influence manipulation and the spread of external shocks. The paradox is much stronger in disassortative networks, where high degree nodes tend to link to low degree nodes. For exemple, in  the political blogs network, where as many as 60%–70% of nodes will have a majority active neighbours, even when only 20% of the nodes are active.  In other words, the majority illusion can be used to trick the population into believing something that is not true.

That’s interesting work that immediately explains a number of interesting phenomena. For a start, it shows how some content can spread globally while other similar content does not

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Program Perspective: How to Successfully Teach for the 21st Century Museum

Program Perspective: How to Successfully Teach for the 21st Century Museum | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
By Adrienne McGraw What skills and attributes do museum professionals need to possess to successfully work in the 21st Century museum? A question like this is always on the minds of museum studies ...
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What skills and attributes do museum professionals need to possess to successfully work in the 21st Century museum?

Tech & media literacy and Personal traits (This finding showed that these are “soft skills” ranging from the ability to be good communicators to possession of high emotional intelligencee) are both teachable!

 

 

 

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Action Video Games Can Increase General Learning Skills

Action Video Games Can Increase General Learning Skills | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

Playing action video games improves not only the skills needed for the game, but also learning skills in general, according to a new study by the University of Rochester.

“Prior research by our group and others has shown that action gamers excel at many tasks. In this new study, we show they excel because they are better learners,” said Daphne Bavelier, Ph.D., a research professor in brain and cognitive sciences at the University of Rochester.

“And they become better learners,” she said, “by playing the fast-paced action games.”

Our brains keep predicting what will come next — whether we’re listening to a conversation, driving, or performing surgery, said Bavalier.

“In order to sharpen its prediction skills, our brains constantly build models, or ‘templates,’ of the world,” she explained. “The better the template, the better the performance. And now we know playing action video games actually fosters better templates.”

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The Psychology of Oversharing Facebook Couples

The Psychology of Oversharing Facebook Couples | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
New research looks at who, exactly, keeps posting those public declarations of love on your newsfeed.

Although Seidman’s previous research found that individuals who overdo it with personal information on Facebook just want to belong, the same pattern didn’t apply to couples in this newest study. Relationship-contingent self-esteem didn’t necessarily mean the relationship itself was lacking; in fact, the same people who posted couple-y items more frequently also tended to be more satisfied with their partners than those who did not.

People whose confidence is more closely tied to the strength of their romantic relationship—or those with higher levels of relationship-contingent self-esteem, in psych-speak—are more likely to use the social networking site to broadcast their happiness.

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Kim & Kat's curator insight, June 14, 2015 1:14 PM

This article discusses the tendency of couples to post about their significant others on Facebook. Similar to 'Facebook Can Clarify the Status of a Relationship', this article shows that couples using Facebook can be beneficial for the relationship. 

 

Previous studies showed (and I know several people who firmly believe) that the more these couples post on Facebook about each other, the more they are simply trying to overcompensate; meaning that their relationship might be struggling, but they think that if they fake it online they might be able to fake it in real life.

 

This new study however shows that it's not necessarily true. While people who find their confidence in the strength of their romantic relationships might be more likely to overshare on Facebook, that doesn't mean that they are struggling. It might just be true happiness. 

 

As previously mentioned, there are people that rely on their relationships for their own personal confidence. These people might be more likely to interact with their significant other on Facebook; sharing photos to their timeline, liking their statuses and photos, posting statuses about how great they are, etc. They want people to see that the relationship is doing well, meaning that they are also doing well as an individual. 

 

I've always heard that people who tend to overshare their happiness on Facebook are the ones that are actually doing poorly in real life, so it was interesting to me to read this. I actually tend NOT to post too much about my husband and I on Facebook, and I think this is one of the reasons. Not that I don't want to gush about him, but I don't want people rolling their eyes and thinking "I wonder what's really going on with them". That said, it's not that I never post about him - I'll post when it's our anniversary or if he surprises me with something romantic or fun.

 

I'm curious about what other people think about this.

As I mentioned earlier, I know several people who share the view that posting a bunch of things about your significant other means that you're overcompensating for your relationship. I'd be lying if I didn't think that sometimes - I mean, I know some people who in real life are having some serious marital problems, but on Facebook they are just 100% in love and devoted to each other. 

 

Kathryn Opp

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Talking to Kids and Teens About Social Media and Sexting

Talking to Kids and Teens About Social Media and Sexting | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

The American Academy of Pediatrics has advice on talking to your kids about sexting.

Today’s teens and tweens are connected to one another, and to the world, via digital technology  more than any previous generation. Recent data suggests that social media venues like Facebook and Twitter have surpassed e-mail as the preferred method of communication in all age groups. While today’s tweens and teens may be more digitally savvy than their parents, their lack of maturity and life experience can quickly get them into trouble with these new social venues.  For this reason, it is imperative that parents talk with their children of all ages about social media and monitor their online social media use to help them navigate this new online social world. How parents talk with their kids and teens will vary slightly by age depending on the topic being discussed. These tips will help you start that journey with your family. -

. - See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Talking-to-Kids-and-Teens-About-Social-Media-and-Sexting.aspx#sthash.Ex1mjqiw.dpuf

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The internet does it again — scientists send a message from a person's brain in India, to a recipient in France, through the internet. Video provided by Newsy

The internet does it again — scientists send a message from a person's brain in India, to a recipient in France, through the internet. Video provided by Newsy | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
The internet does it again — scientists send a message from a person's brain in India, to a recipient in France, through the internet. Video provided by Newsy
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How the British changed their minds about sex

How the British changed their minds about sex | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

A survey by the Observer finds that we are having less sex than our parents. But instead of the death of sex, we may be witnessing its radical transformation, writes Alex Preston We may be witnessing its radical transformation, largely because of the internet

"People have a much broader idea of what sex means, and the different range of sexual activity that they can take part in," he tells me. "There's now more of an understanding that sex ought to be mutually pleasurable and that there's a wide range of different ways to achieve that."Indeed recent studies, most notably last year's Natsal Survey, the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles, have shown a significant broadening in the palette of the nation's erotic activities: our sexual repertoire now runs from cuddling to oral sex, frottage, spanking and a dazzling list of fetishistic turn-ons from nappies to prosthetic limbs, with people having more partners and trying more practices than ever before. Rather than witnessing the death throes of sex, we may just be undergoing a radical re-evaluation of what is meant by the term.The role of  internet in allowing people to embrace non-traditional sexual identities is significant. 

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5 Psychological Challenges Facing Wearables and Quantified Self

5 Psychological Challenges Facing Wearables and Quantified Self | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

With technology up to speed and behavior change apps going mainstream, will we see gym attendance reach all-time highs? I doubt it.

 

"That means regardless of how effective your technology is, it will never reach a large number of people that need it, simply because they aren’t ready to change"


Via JP DOUMENG, Keith McGuinness
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Keith McGuinness's curator insight, September 15, 2014 7:21 PM

This is where app developers need to think more like like clinicians and patients.  Weight loss requires only an interruption of habits; weighing less requires new habitsAn app that helps people weigh less will produce outcomes like better blood pressure control and better blood glucose control. This would be a mobile behavioral health (mbHealth) app.  Clinicians, patients and consumers would flock to it.


But measuring a quantitative health outcome derived from the use of a behavior change app is tricky, because an app's effectiveness depends on the UX and UX is a moving target that depends of ever-changing technology and a measure of art.

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Family Meals May Defuse Cyberbullying's Impact, Study Says - US News

Family Meals May Defuse Cyberbullying's Impact, Study Says - US News | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
Support, communication appear to be buffers

Online abuse can lead to depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts, according to experts.

"One in five adolescents experience cyberbullying," Frank Elgar, a professor at the Institute for Health and Social Policy at McGill University in Montreal, said in a university news release.

"Many adolescents use social media, and online harassment and abuse are difficult for parents and educators to monitor, so it is critical to identify protective factors for youths who are exposed to cyberbullying," said Elgar, who is also a researcher at the Douglas Mental Health Institute.

He and his colleagues examined how family meals -- which provide social contact and support -- might help reduce the mental health impact that cyberbullying can have on teens.

"We found that emotional, behavioral, and substance use problems are 2.6 to 4.5 times more common among victims of cyberbullying. And these impacts are not due to face-to-face bullying; they are specific to cyberbullying," Elgar said.

The link between cyberbullying and these problems was more common among teens who ate fewer meals with their families. The findings suggest that regular family contact and communication may help protect teens against some of the harmful mental health effects of cyberbullying, according to the researchers.

"The results are promising, but we do not want to oversimplify what we observed. Many adolescents do not have regular family meals but receive support in other ways, like shared breakfasts, or the morning school run," Elgar said.Elgar also emphasized that parental involvement and supervision can help protect youngsters from cyberbullying.

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Video-game playing for less than an hour a day is linked with better-adjusted children, study finds

Video-game playing for less than an hour a day is linked with better-adjusted children, study finds | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it
A new study suggests video game-playing for less than an hour a day is linked with better-adjusted children and teenagers. The research found that young people who indulged in a little video game-playing were associated with being better adjusted than those who had never played or those who were on video games for three hours or more.

However, the study, published in the journal, Pediatrics, suggests that the influence of video games on children, for good or for ill, is very small when compared with more 'enduring' factors, such as whether the child is from a functioning family, their school relationships, and whether they are materially deprived.  It involved nearly 5,000 young people, half male and half female, drawn from a nationally representative study of UK households.

The results suggest that three in four British children and teenagers play video games on a daily basis, and that those who spent more than half their daily free time playing electronic games were not as well adjusted. It speculates that this could be because they miss out on other enriching activities and possibly expose themselves to inappropriate content designed for adults Meanwhile, when compared to non-players and those who played very frequently, those who played video games for less than an hour (estimated to be less than one-third of their daily free time), were associated with the highest levels of sociability and were most likely to say they were satisfied with their lives. They also appeared to have fewer friendship and emotional problems, and reported less hyperactivity than the other groups.

 

Study author Dr Andrew Przybylski from the Oxford Internet Institute said: the small, positive effects we observed for low levels of play on electronic games do not support the idea that video games on their own can help children develop in an increasingly digital world. Further research needs to be carried out to look closely at the specific attributes of games that make them beneficial or harmful. It will also be important to identify how social environments such as family, peers, and the community shape how gaming experiences influence young people.'

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Can Twitter survive in a Facebook world? The key is being different

Can Twitter survive in a Facebook world? The key is being different | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

 

In November 2010, 8% of online adults used the platform. As of January 2014, 19% of online adults were using Twitter.

On Twitter, anyone can follow anyone else on Twitter without there being a reciprocal agreement between the follower and followed, as there is on Facebook.

Thus, the structure of Twitter is a more public one when it comes to activity by its users—something that might limit the total number of people who would want to use it. Not everyone has things they want to say to a crowd.

Twitter has also evolved into a unique ecosystem when it comes to the way people form groups for a variety of purposes. A special analysis of tens of thousands of Twitter conversations by the Pew Research Center and the Social Media Research Foundation found distinct patterns to the conversational and social structures that take place on Twitter, all with different purposes. These include “polarized crowds” that form around political topics; crowds that gather around areas of learning; clusters that form around brands and celebrities; “community” groups that arise around conversations about aspects of global news; breaking news; and support networks (such as those set up by businesses for their customers).

The Twitter conversations study shows that Twitter can be essential for these specific kinds of conversations, especially those where news and politics are central to the conversation, and those that form around commentary from pundits that are potent agenda setters and conversation starters.

If Twitter has its limits, why does it get so much attention?

First, it is used by a lot of people, even if it’s not in Facebook territory. Second, Twitter is technically set up in ways that make it relatively easy to measure and study. Third, the things that interest Twitter users are the things that interest journalists and scholars. The Twitterverse is made up largely of political activists and cultural commentators.

Still, it is also the case that as long as political influencers and activists consider Twitter to be an effective platform, it will be an important cultural barometer.

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How smart tech is improving our human relationships

How smart tech is improving our human relationships | Social Media Impact on  relationships | Scoop.it

The new generation of smart technology may actually be serving to enhance our human relationships and not diminish them, as many fear.

Smart is enabling new ways for us to relate to each other. Relationships are at the heart of the notion of smart society, and digital technologies appear to be changing the ways we relate to each other.

Whether it is about the way we connect with each other, the spatial and temporal dimensions of our communication, the breadth and depth of our connections, or the meanings that are conveyed and experience shared, the use of new connected technologies and networks changes the dynamics of our relationships through the following five levers:

 

Directness, We can see and interact with each other more directly in real time as a result of digital technologies that enable real-time visuals

Continuity, Digital technologies also allow for continuous and more regular interactions, particularly when it is neither possible nor desirable to meet in person, or when we are geographically dispersed

Parity, Digital technologies are a leveller – they enable all sections of society to engage with each other on equal footing.

Commonality, We are increasingly able to focus our relationships on striving towards common goals when there is shared purpose in our relationships

Multiplexity, Increased directness and continuity in relationships often lead to higher levels of multiplexity, that is having deeper knowledge of others and wider understanding of situational contexts in relationships

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Kim & Kat's curator insight, June 14, 2015 4:08 PM

It's really interesting to me to see how differently the articles and videos I'm finding view the impact of technology on relationships. This particular article takes on the viewpoint that technology is actually helping our relationships become stronger rather than harming them. The article touches on five aspects of relationships and communication that the smart technology of today helps emphasize:

 

1. Directness - We are able to immediately come into contact with someone without having to leave a room. We don't have to set up a meeting, drive to a location, etc.

2. Continuity - Our conversations don't have to stop just because we leave to go somewhere else.

3. Multiplexity - We are able to keep in touch in a number of ways, allowing for more people to know more about us. Everything is connected.

4. Parity - anyone can engage with anyone.

5. Commonality - We can create a shared purpose in our relationships.

 

I agree with this article for the most part. As a communications major with an emphasis in media studies, I find myself siding with the "technology is good!" viewpoint a lot of times. I was in a long distance relationship with my husband for a long time, even prior to him joining the military. When he was in basic training, we could only write letters. No texting, emailing, phone calls - just plain snail mail. I wasn't able to pick up my phone and talk to him almost any time of the day. I don't think that hurt our relationship in any way though, but it certainly made it more difficult to be away from him when I couldn't hear his voice or see his face on FaceTime.

 

I believe this article also applies to non-romantic relationships. I'm in the process of working with someone to get an internship, and it's all online. The man I'm talking to works in California, but I could do this internship at home from my computer. I'm able to be in contact with him through email, Skype, and over the phone. 20 years ago, I would have never been able to get this internship without moving, if I was even able to hear about it at all...(though it is a social media based internship, so it wouldn't even exist!)

 

I do see how people think that technology harms relationships. There was a picture that I've seen shared a lot recently of a young teenager (he looked around 14-15) sitting at lunch with his grandmother. He has headphones in and is staring straight down at his phone and his grandmother looks really sad since she just wants to spend time with his grandson. In this case, the use of technology is actually harmful to the relationship. 

 

I think, and I've said this before, that it's up to the people in the relationship to learn how to properly use technology to benefit the relationship. Too much of anything is harmful, and it's just about finding a good balance. 

 

Kathryn Opp